Bruce talked about “The Warrior”

Bruce talked about “The Warrior”

LJF
Joined: December 6th, 2014, 3:05 am

December 9th, 2015, 7:56 am #1

In Issue 248 (Oct-Nov’71) of “Four Seas Weekly,” Bruce told the reporter (after he returned to HK from the U.S. on 16 Oct 1971) about “The Warrior” TV series.

1) Reporter: “Are you going to stay in HK and make movies for GH?”
Bruce: “Have to wait until Nov. then the decision can be made. This time round, when I returned to the U.S. and shoot a pilot episode for “Longstreet,” I received quite an overwhelming response from the local audience and also got favorable mentions by the “New York Times.” Many newspapers interviewed me and they wrote the articles at great length.”

2) Reporter: “Oh, that’s great. Could you please tell us more?”
Bruce: “There are already a few Hollywood movie companies who wanted me to play in their TV series, particularly Paramount and Warner Brothers. The battle was ferocious and the outcome is, I signed a contract with Warner Brothers even though the remuneration that Paramount gave me is higher than Warner Brothers.”

3) Reporter: “Why so?”
Bruce: “It’s not just solely about money because there’s a script called “The Warrior” which I like it very much and will begin shooting in Nov. Paramount, on the other hand, would only give me the script next year. Being the center of “The Warrior” TV series, I loved the script very much. It’s very important in his life as in the foreign country, there’ve never been a Chinese leading actor/actress in a TV series or movie before, even in “The Green Hornet” and “Longstreet,” I’m only the second lead actor. That’s why I’m very concerned about “The Warrior” TV series.

4) Reporter: “What’s the script of ‘The Warrior’ like?”
Bruce: It’s a very creative, special and legendary story. The leading role in the story killed the Emperor’s uncle of the Ching dynasty, he escaped to the West and led a vagrant life. He rode a donkey and you could see a dragon and a tiger tattoos each on his left and right arms. The image of the lead character is very special. But, the script has not been approved yet...”

(Note: ‘The Warrior’ was later re-titled “Kung Fu” (1972–1975), played by white actor, David Carradine. Although Bruce created the concept for this series but it was ‘stolen’ by Warner Brothers. He also lost the role to David Carradine. Bruce then stayed in HK to make a few movies that smashed the box-office in most parts of Asia and one year later, Warner Brothers was back to ask him to be in the movie “Enter The Dragon.”)
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Joined: October 13th, 2011, 9:53 pm

December 9th, 2015, 9:04 am #2

Thanks LJF

The snips give so much that was going on at that time and reveal alot more than known before
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Howard
Howard

December 9th, 2015, 9:27 am #3

How did David Carradine, a non-martial artist landed the leading role in Kung Fu tv series?
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Joined: July 24th, 2015, 3:19 am

December 9th, 2015, 11:33 am #4

In Issue 248 (Oct-Nov’71) of “Four Seas Weekly,” Bruce told the reporter (after he returned to HK from the U.S. on 16 Oct 1971) about “The Warrior” TV series.

1) Reporter: “Are you going to stay in HK and make movies for GH?”
Bruce: “Have to wait until Nov. then the decision can be made. This time round, when I returned to the U.S. and shoot a pilot episode for “Longstreet,” I received quite an overwhelming response from the local audience and also got favorable mentions by the “New York Times.” Many newspapers interviewed me and they wrote the articles at great length.”

2) Reporter: “Oh, that’s great. Could you please tell us more?”
Bruce: “There are already a few Hollywood movie companies who wanted me to play in their TV series, particularly Paramount and Warner Brothers. The battle was ferocious and the outcome is, I signed a contract with Warner Brothers even though the remuneration that Paramount gave me is higher than Warner Brothers.”

3) Reporter: “Why so?”
Bruce: “It’s not just solely about money because there’s a script called “The Warrior” which I like it very much and will begin shooting in Nov. Paramount, on the other hand, would only give me the script next year. Being the center of “The Warrior” TV series, I loved the script very much. It’s very important in his life as in the foreign country, there’ve never been a Chinese leading actor/actress in a TV series or movie before, even in “The Green Hornet” and “Longstreet,” I’m only the second lead actor. That’s why I’m very concerned about “The Warrior” TV series.

4) Reporter: “What’s the script of ‘The Warrior’ like?”
Bruce: It’s a very creative, special and legendary story. The leading role in the story killed the Emperor’s uncle of the Ching dynasty, he escaped to the West and led a vagrant life. He rode a donkey and you could see a dragon and a tiger tattoos each on his left and right arms. The image of the lead character is very special. But, the script has not been approved yet...”

(Note: ‘The Warrior’ was later re-titled “Kung Fu” (1972–1975), played by white actor, David Carradine. Although Bruce created the concept for this series but it was ‘stolen’ by Warner Brothers. He also lost the role to David Carradine. Bruce then stayed in HK to make a few movies that smashed the box-office in most parts of Asia and one year later, Warner Brothers was back to ask him to be in the movie “Enter The Dragon.”)
Just to be clear: Bruce Lee did NOT create the Kung Fu TV series. The series was created by Ed Spielman and Howard Friedlander. Spielman had been developing the idea since back in the mid-1960s.


According to Herbie J. Pilato, author of The "Kung Fu" Book of Caine and The "Kung Fu" Book of Wisdom:

"Ed Spielman is the creator of the 'Kung Fu' series. Any claims to the contrary are incorrect, and an injustice. As a teenager, Mr. Spielman worked as a page at ABC-TV in New York. He discovered the secret arts of kung-fu in the early 1960s, and he studied Mandarin Chinese in College at night. He spent years doing his research in New York's Chinatown and elsewhere unearthing this heretofore secret knowledge. At that time, kung-fu was not known in the Western world and was denied to non-Chinese. It was taught by master/student relationships and within families. It was never revealed to non-Chinese. But, Spielman pressed on.

By the mid-1960s, Ed had acquired a depth of information, and wrote a forty-four-page treatment for film, TV and publishing titled, 'Kung Fu: The Way of the Tiger, The Sign of the Dragon.' He spent the next few years trying to move it forward to film or television. In 1969, he was introduced to young agent Peter Lampack at the William Morris Agency in New York. Lampack liked the material and made a deal with Warner's executive Bennett Sims in New York.

In February of 1970, Lampack bartered a deal for Spielman and his friend and collaborator, Howard Friedlander, to write a theatrical motion picture screenplay from Spielman's original story. All of this occurred in New York.

At the end of this development, Warner Bros. chose not to make the theatrical film. But, studio executive Harvey Frand had faith in the project, and took it to ABC, which by that time, had introduced a pioneering 'Movie of The Week' format.

The Spielman/Friedlander script was pared down for budget, produced and shown on ABC, February 22, 1972. It was an immediate hit. The iconic 'Kung Fu' monthly-then-weekly series followed...

Undoubtedly, Bruce Lee had his own ideas and aspirations, but that has nothing to do with Ed Spielman's ground-breaking and original work. The Writers Guild of America West awarded sole credit to Ed Spielman as the creator of 'Kung Fu'... And no allegation of Bruce Lee's having to do with the creation of 'Kung Fu' appeared in public until 'The Bruce Lee Story' (1993) in which the allegation was made.
Ed Spielman told me specifically: 'In 1993, I was preparing a major law suit against Universal, DeLaurentis Productions and all of those who were responsible for the false allegations in 'The Bruce Lee Story' to deprive me of the authorship of my work and defame me. But, Bruce Lee died in 1973 and his son Brandon also tragically died in 1993. A lawsuit by me would have fallen on Bruce Lee's widow, Linda. She had lost enough. I didn't think she would have survived those years in court. I thought about it...then told the lawyers to forget about it. The documents speak for themselves for anyone who cares to look...I was greatly disappointed that Bruce Lee did not appear as a principal in the 'Kung Fu' series. But he had nothing to do with its creation. My work and the 'Kung Fu' project was on the East Coast; his was on the West Coast. My work predated his by years. The complete story and characters were registered in the mid-1960s. The documents and contracts prove that."
— Herbie J. Pilato

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kung_Fu_%28TV_series%29



Fred Weintraub on the Kung Fu series:

"I had just become an executive at Warner Bros. in their New York office. I was pitched by two young men — Ed Spielman and Howard Friedlander — a project called Kung Fu. I commissioned them $3,500 to write the script for Warner Bros. They wrote the script, and later I moved to Burbank, California. I presented the script to the studio, but Warner Bros. wouldn’t make it into a movie. I walked over to the television division and gave it to a man who later became one of my partners. He liked the idea and gave the order to get started.

At that time, I had a friend named Sy Weintraub. While I was in LA, he was taking private lessons from Bruce — along with Steve McQueen and James Coburn. One day, Sy said, “You ought to meet this Bruce Lee,” and he introduced us.

I found him to be charming, bright and very intellectual. We became good friends. When they were casting Kung Fu, I said, “I have the perfect guy” — or at least I thought he was — and I took Bruce to see Tom Kuhn. Bruce used the nunchaku and just amazed Tom.

Tom called me over and said, “Who is this guy?” I said, “He’s going to be a great action star.” He said, “Let me see what the network thinks.”

Of course, the network turned him down. They felt the time wasn’t right for an international star. Bruce did not get the part."

http://www.blackbeltmag.com/daily/marti ... ockbuster/
"All type of knowledge ultimately means self-knowledge"
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Joined: July 16th, 2003, 11:43 am

December 9th, 2015, 1:52 pm #5

Thanks LJF.

Issue 305 DEC 8-14 1972

GAME cover. I will scan the page so you can see if there's anything of interest.
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Joined: July 16th, 2003, 11:43 am

December 9th, 2015, 2:32 pm #6

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LJF
Joined: December 6th, 2014, 3:05 am

December 9th, 2015, 4:10 pm #7

Just to be clear: Bruce Lee did NOT create the Kung Fu TV series. The series was created by Ed Spielman and Howard Friedlander. Spielman had been developing the idea since back in the mid-1960s.


According to Herbie J. Pilato, author of The "Kung Fu" Book of Caine and The "Kung Fu" Book of Wisdom:

"Ed Spielman is the creator of the 'Kung Fu' series. Any claims to the contrary are incorrect, and an injustice. As a teenager, Mr. Spielman worked as a page at ABC-TV in New York. He discovered the secret arts of kung-fu in the early 1960s, and he studied Mandarin Chinese in College at night. He spent years doing his research in New York's Chinatown and elsewhere unearthing this heretofore secret knowledge. At that time, kung-fu was not known in the Western world and was denied to non-Chinese. It was taught by master/student relationships and within families. It was never revealed to non-Chinese. But, Spielman pressed on.

By the mid-1960s, Ed had acquired a depth of information, and wrote a forty-four-page treatment for film, TV and publishing titled, 'Kung Fu: The Way of the Tiger, The Sign of the Dragon.' He spent the next few years trying to move it forward to film or television. In 1969, he was introduced to young agent Peter Lampack at the William Morris Agency in New York. Lampack liked the material and made a deal with Warner's executive Bennett Sims in New York.

In February of 1970, Lampack bartered a deal for Spielman and his friend and collaborator, Howard Friedlander, to write a theatrical motion picture screenplay from Spielman's original story. All of this occurred in New York.

At the end of this development, Warner Bros. chose not to make the theatrical film. But, studio executive Harvey Frand had faith in the project, and took it to ABC, which by that time, had introduced a pioneering 'Movie of The Week' format.

The Spielman/Friedlander script was pared down for budget, produced and shown on ABC, February 22, 1972. It was an immediate hit. The iconic 'Kung Fu' monthly-then-weekly series followed...

Undoubtedly, Bruce Lee had his own ideas and aspirations, but that has nothing to do with Ed Spielman's ground-breaking and original work. The Writers Guild of America West awarded sole credit to Ed Spielman as the creator of 'Kung Fu'... And no allegation of Bruce Lee's having to do with the creation of 'Kung Fu' appeared in public until 'The Bruce Lee Story' (1993) in which the allegation was made.
Ed Spielman told me specifically: 'In 1993, I was preparing a major law suit against Universal, DeLaurentis Productions and all of those who were responsible for the false allegations in 'The Bruce Lee Story' to deprive me of the authorship of my work and defame me. But, Bruce Lee died in 1973 and his son Brandon also tragically died in 1993. A lawsuit by me would have fallen on Bruce Lee's widow, Linda. She had lost enough. I didn't think she would have survived those years in court. I thought about it...then told the lawyers to forget about it. The documents speak for themselves for anyone who cares to look...I was greatly disappointed that Bruce Lee did not appear as a principal in the 'Kung Fu' series. But he had nothing to do with its creation. My work and the 'Kung Fu' project was on the East Coast; his was on the West Coast. My work predated his by years. The complete story and characters were registered in the mid-1960s. The documents and contracts prove that."
— Herbie J. Pilato

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kung_Fu_%28TV_series%29



Fred Weintraub on the Kung Fu series:

"I had just become an executive at Warner Bros. in their New York office. I was pitched by two young men — Ed Spielman and Howard Friedlander — a project called Kung Fu. I commissioned them $3,500 to write the script for Warner Bros. They wrote the script, and later I moved to Burbank, California. I presented the script to the studio, but Warner Bros. wouldn’t make it into a movie. I walked over to the television division and gave it to a man who later became one of my partners. He liked the idea and gave the order to get started.

At that time, I had a friend named Sy Weintraub. While I was in LA, he was taking private lessons from Bruce — along with Steve McQueen and James Coburn. One day, Sy said, “You ought to meet this Bruce Lee,” and he introduced us.

I found him to be charming, bright and very intellectual. We became good friends. When they were casting Kung Fu, I said, “I have the perfect guy” — or at least I thought he was — and I took Bruce to see Tom Kuhn. Bruce used the nunchaku and just amazed Tom.

Tom called me over and said, “Who is this guy?” I said, “He’s going to be a great action star.” He said, “Let me see what the network thinks.”

Of course, the network turned him down. They felt the time wasn’t right for an international star. Bruce did not get the part."

http://www.blackbeltmag.com/daily/marti ... ockbuster/
Thanks for the additional info, JKD54.
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LJF
Joined: December 6th, 2014, 3:05 am

December 9th, 2015, 4:45 pm #8

I got this article too. The entire article is talking about WOTD and how BL broke his record from BOSS, FURY and then getting ready to smash 5 million office record. Not even a single thing on GAME, can't understand why they put 2 GAME photos which are not related to the content.
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Joined: July 16th, 2003, 11:43 am

December 9th, 2015, 6:47 pm #9

Thanks LJF. Why is Robert Straus mentioned?
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LJF
Joined: December 6th, 2014, 3:05 am

December 10th, 2015, 9:41 am #10

The article misspelled “Robert Clouse” as “Robert Straus.” It says Warner Bros would be getting “Robert Straus”to be the director of ETD.
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