Joined: December 19th, 2017, 9:38 pm

September 12th, 2018, 2:29 pm #21

Oh, hah, I just re read that part about 'highly developed ki' and had a laugh. I do not think Chuck Norris had any conception of what 'Ki, or Qi' was since he was basically an athlete and not a Chinese master. We talked about 'Ki' all the time in our Korean karate classes but we never did any 'silk-rolling' or IS development stuff. We were just using martial-babble-speak.
FWIW
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 26th, 2018, 8:39 pm

September 12th, 2018, 2:44 pm #22

Hey badger, can you tell me what "Fa-jing" is ?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 19th, 2018, 12:49 am

September 12th, 2018, 3:46 pm #23

[quote="badger01j"]
Oh, hah, I just re read that part about 'highly developed ki' and had a laugh. I do not think Chuck Norris had any conception of what 'Ki, or Qi' was since he was basically an athlete and not a Chinese master. We talked about 'Ki' all the time in our Korean karate classes but we never did any 'silk-rolling' or IS development stuff. We were just using martial-babble-speak.
FWIW
[/quote]

The following is from Chuck Norris' book The Secret Power Within: Zen Solutiond To Real Problems...

QUOTE:

The Secret Power Within

PREFACE

My first experience with Zen was in 1962 in Torrance, California. I was a young black belt and I had just started a martial arts school, which was one of the first in the Los Angeles area. The school, located in what had been a store, was right on the corner of two main streets. Cars passing by would slow down to look through the big windows, and people would often just walk in off the street to watch the classes for a while--a karate class was something unusual back then. From time to time a monk wearing the saffron robes of a Buddhist would drop by. I'd see him come in, be aware of him sitting there quietly watching me teach my students, and then I'd look up to find that he was gone.

One day, at the end of a session, I went over to talk with him before he could leave. I learned he was from the Yogananda temple in downtown Los Angeles and that he, too, was a martial artist. The fact that we were both martial artists made him feel a certain kinship with me, and he had a lot he wanted to share. As we chatted, he mentioned the word ki several times, which he described as an internal force and said was related to Zen..."
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 19th, 2018, 12:49 am

September 12th, 2018, 3:58 pm #24

[quote="albrado"]
Regarding hypnosis, I read a long time ago in Black Belt magazine that James DeMile had indeed taught this technique to Bruce Lee. And I think, if I remember correctly, he said that the results were mixed because he had a very versatile mind which prevented him from remaining calm and focused only on one suggestion. Nevertheless, Bruce practiced at least some form of self-suggestion by writing phrases that served him as leitmotive such as "Walk on". I don’t know how long he did that, nor at what period of his life....
[/quote]

When you have a minute, Google the following words words:

hynotism in self-defense eugene h. ho

Then, click on the link "Black Belt Magazine Vol. 11, No. 10."

Enjoy

:)
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 19th, 2017, 9:38 pm

September 12th, 2018, 5:08 pm #25

[quote="albrado"]
Hey badger, can you tell me what "Fa-jing" is ?
[/quote]

OK, sure. fajing or fajin is a word which describes the method or practice in Chen-style Taiji which utilizes ground-path energy to issue power in striking.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fa_jin

As I read that I now realize that fajing is a common misspelling, but many people use it. Here is a video fo Chen X Wang using it in a demo on youtube



Hope this helps.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 26th, 2018, 8:39 pm

September 12th, 2018, 6:51 pm #26

Thank you for all the info. Joe Lewis said that he was doing Zen exercises with Bruce Lee, but he never explain what this kind of training was all about. Too bad…
For Fa-jing, I did not know that Tai Chi had such dynamic forms. Bruce started tai chi with his father before practising wing chun. Do you think Fa-jing could have contributed to the development of the one-inch punch? Is that why you asked James Demile if he knew this technique?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 25th, 2015, 1:24 pm

September 12th, 2018, 8:05 pm #27

Joe Lewis said that he was doing Zen exercises with Bruce Lee


when did he say that ?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 26th, 2018, 8:39 pm

September 12th, 2018, 8:42 pm #28

Here :

http://www.ufighting.com/forum/displaym ... 4146&fid=2

« Bruce Lee and I did touch hands. We did a lot of that chi-sao type drills. We did a lot of speed, timing, awareness, focusing and zen drills. »

Here's another link where Joe Lewis talks about Bruce Lee's « Zen level ». Until now, no one has ever tried to understand this  aspect of JKD. I think it's a big gap. This would surely help to better understand how he worked on the concept of interception.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 19th, 2018, 12:49 am

September 12th, 2018, 9:44 pm #29

From:

http://www.ufighting.com/forum/displaym ... 4146&fid=2

Quote:

Joe Lewis: On his personal expression of Jeet Kune Do: He was constantly changing his definition of Jeet Kune Do.I used to go up in front of the audience after I'd won a tournament, and Bruce Lee had written out this little speech about Jeet Kune Do, and I could never get it right. I didn't have a clue on how to make sense on to understand what he had written for me to say. Simply put, the only definition I remember clearly is one day I went to his house and Bruce Lee said Ah! You know what Jeet Kune Do means? It means the `thusness' of the techniques. How do you like that?Like I'm supposed to know what thusness means. I guess that's sort of a Zen quote.*

End Quote:

Seems to me Joe did not even know what was/was not "Zen."

Thus, that he did not really know what might/might not constitute a "Zen drill."

Let alone, what "thusness" refers to.

The "punch is merely a punch, a kick is merely a kick" allow the moment to dictate which is called for, when.

That sort of thing.

Which is what "non-intention" is.

Lol, as in that time between Bruce and Dan Lee, when Bruce came at Dan, but by that, Bruce's "attack" unwittingly "offered" Dan "an opportunity to intercept" Bruce - at which point, Dan's Western Boxing kicked in and he automatically smacked the heck out of Bruce...an echo to Bruce's sound.

ROTFL

That had to have been one hilarious moment!

But Dan's had been non-intention - the thusness of the techniques.

Not "Zen" though "Zen like."

Rather, jeet kune do...
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 26th, 2018, 8:39 pm

September 12th, 2018, 10:19 pm #30

Mmhhh ... Joe Lewis knew Krishnamurti's teaching pretty well. Therefore, I think he also knew what Zen was all about. This discipline is not as esoteric as we think. It is practiced very naturally in kendo. In this martial art, the principle of interception is highly developed. Especially at the level of intent (Sensen-no-sen). To be able to read the intentions of their opponent, kendokas works a lot on awareness (mushin and zanshin). At the time of kenjutsu it was vital. Bruce knew all that. This stuff is perfectly transferable to hand to hand fighting. Moreover, karate is also based on these principles.
Quote
Like
Share