Steve L.
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Joined: December 8th, 2005, 12:15 pm

November 16th, 2006, 10:03 am #11

Cool workshop board! :lol: <duck&cover>
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Matthew Amt
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Joined: December 15th, 2004, 8:13 pm

December 10th, 2006, 7:59 pm #12

Well, it's done, but it's a potato chip. Re-wetting and re-weighting did not work, so it is now concave in the wrong direction, a full 2 inches deep. Rats. Tired with messing with it, and can't really afford to just chuck it a try again, so I put the boss and neck strap on it and it will just have to do for now. It is about 30 inches in height and width.

The boss is based on one of those from the grave at Liatovouni. I believe it was Andrea who kindly posted the photos of those. The museum has them set up as pectoral plates, but since they were found at the feet of the body it's pretty clear to me that they were shield bosses. Mine is a little smaller than the largest one, and has 2 concentric rows of embossed dots. I can't see any holes at the rim for nails or stitching, so I just went with 4 nail holes.

http://www.larp.com/hoplite/WVshld9.jpg

The handle is oak, secured with 2 nails at each end plus the top and bottom nails that hold the boss. The neck strap is also riveted on with 2 large copper nails and bronze washers.

If the thing had stayed flat, I was going to add at least 2 more smaller bosses. At this point I might trim a little more wood off the back to lighten it a bit. Haven't had a chance to weigh it--it's not horribly heavy, I just wouldn't mind it being a tad lighter.

I have no idea why the paint has that lighter band around the edge! Nor what the darker oily stains are down at the lower left. Sigh... Well, it's certainly been educational!

Enjoy,

Matthew
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Matthew Amt
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Joined: December 15th, 2004, 8:13 pm

December 10th, 2006, 8:13 pm #13

Here's a view of the back, and a link to an edge-on photo showing the concavity.

http://www.larp.com/hoplite/WVshld11.jpg

WVshld8.jpg
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Steve L.
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Joined: December 8th, 2005, 12:15 pm

December 10th, 2006, 9:41 pm #14

But it looks good! Top work!
WVshld10.jpg
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Todd Feinman
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Joined: December 14th, 2004, 11:17 pm

December 11th, 2006, 4:30 pm #15

Steve L.,Dec 10 2006 wrote: But it looks good! Top work!
Absolutely!! Very nice work Matt! The warping seems to happen to just about everyone trying to glue a wet or damp hide (or sinew!) to a wood substrate...

Todd
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Edwin Deady
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Joined: July 5th, 2005, 1:25 pm

December 11th, 2006, 9:45 pm #16

Yes, very nice. If it is any comfort concave is the usual state of a lot of African and Indian hide shields.

Edwin
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Joined: May 25th, 2005, 11:31 am

December 11th, 2006, 10:04 pm #17

Nice Job Matt!

I feel though that this thread should be in the Aegean section

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Sean Manning
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Joined: May 30th, 2006, 1:33 am

December 11th, 2006, 10:21 pm #18

Beautiful! At least you have things like these, even if it didn't come out perfectly. As others have said, the originals may often have had similar flaws- they were (probably) made by professional craftsmen who knew tricks we don't, but might not have been such labours of love.
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Matthew Amt
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Joined: December 15th, 2004, 8:13 pm

December 12th, 2006, 3:02 pm #19

Thanks, guys, much appreciated! The frustrating part is that the first time I put the rawhide on the board, it worked fine. It was only after I removed it and hollowed out the back and then reapplied the hide that it warped. But yeah, I'd never expect perfection, even from the originals, and it should still work fine.

Matthew

PS: Yeah, I managed to post this in the wrong section somehow! I'll see if Gregory can move it.
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Joined: September 10th, 2006, 2:05 am

December 13th, 2006, 11:39 am #20

I also have had warpage with my aspis. :o
however i think that stretching the rawhide prior to stitching is perhaps the way around this. The harris brothers made their hoplon/aspis this way. Apparently tieing / nailing one (sodden ) edge to a beam and tieing a weight( like an anvil to the bottom edge and leaving it suspended for about a week was the way they started the process. when actually stitching the hide to their base they had a coke bottle inside maintaining the stretch until they had almost completed the stitching, withrew it and then stiched up the last "opening". I tried this on a basket lid years ago but got puckering for my trouble. Very hard and durable shield that one.

Long ago I read up on Plains Indians and how they made their buffalo hide shields. It involved digging a forming pit and a fire. I cant remember any other detail except that the fire made the hide "shrink" (like a shrinky ) and get extra thick. I always wished to simulate this experiment.

Good luck on the 12 hide shield Matthew. My friend Mark Reynolds projects that Brahmas have the right markings for this shield. What do others think?
regardz
:rolleyes:
richard r
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