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Pryse or not Pryse

Joined: October 27th, 2017, 3:59 pm

May 8th, 2018, 4:44 pm #1

I have some interest in this gun that was on GunBroker, but also have some concerns as to it being a "real" Pryse. It is in .38 caliber, no serial numbers are evident or patent marks or manufacture name. On the barrel is stamped I. Hollis & Sons London. I have done some research and found information about Cournet revolvers, Belgian made copies. So, anyone care to share information on this? Thanks in advance. Pryse-4.jpg Pryse-3.jpg Pryse-1.jpg Pryse-2.jpg
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Viclav
Veteran of the Regiment
Viclav
Veteran of the Regiment
Joined: March 13th, 2003, 10:38 pm

May 8th, 2018, 10:17 pm #2

Well, until the revolver experts come along, I’ll note that the gun looks correct from what I can see, and has proper proof marks. It doesn’t look much like a Counet, from what I remember of them. Hollis was a well known maker and retailer. I’ve seen other revolvers marketed by them, so no particular reason I can see to think this one is suspect. I’ll certainly stand correction from my betters...


Victor


“Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson.”
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joelblack88
Veteran of the Regiment
joelblack88
Veteran of the Regiment
Joined: February 1st, 2006, 3:21 am

May 9th, 2018, 9:16 pm #3

It looks to me like a Francotte.
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Joined: October 27th, 2017, 3:59 pm

May 10th, 2018, 2:13 am #4

Wish I was more knowledgable, but what is the significance of that? I see British marks on it, so could this be a contract gun for use in Britain? I believe the Francotte maker was of high quality standards, yes?
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joelblack88
Veteran of the Regiment
joelblack88
Veteran of the Regiment
Joined: February 1st, 2006, 3:21 am

May 10th, 2018, 2:22 am #5

Francotte's standards were easily as high as Webley. A firm like Hollis would import the parts, fit, finish and have the proved. 
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Joined: October 27th, 2017, 3:59 pm

May 10th, 2018, 2:39 am #6

Which would explain the British proof marks. I learned that if a complete gun came from Belgium, or elsewhere, it would require the proof marks of that country. The lack of maker's name or patent, is that because I. Hollis "made" the gun? No serial number either, and it was suggested that this gun was possibly to be a revolver/saber duo and never was marked as a pair.
Possible manufacture date estimate?
I now have the engravedTranter 1868 revolver from your Tranter book, purchased from John Eiden. A fine piece of work.
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Joined: October 27th, 2017, 3:59 pm

May 15th, 2018, 3:21 pm #7

I received the above posted revolver in the mail yesterday. There are some issues to be addressed, but all in all, I'm content. When the action is opened, the extractor extends but doesn't "snap back" as other, later  guns do. Is this correct on this model? And, no lanyard loop and keeper. Is there a source for one correct for this firearm? Not holding my breath, but one never knows. Also the action functions okay single and double action except the trigger does not return forward. It feels gummy when I push the trigger forward, and the fellow I purchased it from said he had sprayed some WD 40 into it, so that may well be an explanation. Okay then, thanks.
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wmiller144
Colour Sergeant
wmiller144
Colour Sergeant
Joined: July 5th, 2004, 8:40 am

May 17th, 2018, 1:33 am #8

Webley patented the no. 4’s automatically returning extractor in 1881, Bruce and Reinhart at 105, so it wouldn’t have appeared on earlier pieces.
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Joined: October 27th, 2017, 3:59 pm

May 17th, 2018, 7:03 pm #9

WMiller144, that's good to know. I have stripped down this, uh, Francotte-Pryse? and there is nothing in the extractor mechanism that indeed would let the extractor snap back. I was thinking this gun was made in the mid late 1870s, and wondered if I was on track there. It is a little overwhelming, how many variants of the Francotte/Pryse/Cournet/Webley top breaks there seem to be. Just the variations in the cylinder designs could fill a book, it seems to me. This one is very nicely made.
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