George Gibbs Martini-Henry

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George Gibbs Martini-Henry

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23 Sep 2002, 23:16 #1

I need help in identifying this 577 450 Martini-Henry
It's marked George Gibbs Bristol on the top of the barrel, seems like a plain Mark 1 short lever military rifle with bayonnet lug except no military markings. Serial of barrel does not match action # Butt has better quality wood.
Military sights.
Rifling is different looks like 7 grooves (I will slug it )
Thanks for your help

Pierre
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CoyoteAndMommote
Veteran of the Regiment
CoyoteAndMommote
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Joined: 16 Mar 2002, 07:49

24 Sep 2002, 00:07 #2

Pierre! Send pics! JPG format attached to an e-mail! A picture is worth a thousand words, and a scan is worth at least 500! (Chuckle, chuckle, chuckle!)

A scan of the receiver, both sides, and a scan of the top of the barrel in the knoxform area will help lots! Do you know what caliber it is?

Our e-mail is: momsoldguns@qwest.net

A new commercial Martini! Hee, hee, hee!

Coyot
"The attacker must vanquish, the defender has only to prevail." --Coyoté
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CoyoteAndMommote
Veteran of the Regiment
CoyoteAndMommote
Veteran of the Regiment
Joined: 16 Mar 2002, 07:49

26 Sep 2002, 08:27 #3

Caliber: .577/.450

Overall, left side.
Three-quarter view, left side.
Action, left side.
Action, right side.
Top...
Front sight, left side.
Muzzle.
Muzzle, top.
More pictures in Pierre's album on the FotoTime.com site!

"The attacker must vanquish, the defender, has but to prevail." --Coyot
"The attacker must vanquish, the defender has only to prevail." --Coyoté
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Double D
Colour Sergeant
Double D
Colour Sergeant
Joined: 17 Mar 2002, 04:22

21 Oct 2002, 18:15 #4

We brought one of these G.Gibbs rifles back from South Africa this summer. Our has been reblued and has been used for comeptitive shooting down there.

It is what is called a Trade Rifle. Made up for the trade to sell much like Western Auto and Sears used to buy guns from Winchester and Remington with ther JC Higgins or Western Auto Brand name on them.

These were available with many different features that weren't always exactly standard military. I have a Westley Richards Trade rifle that looks identical, except it has a rear sight that is adjustable for windage in the blade and german silver vernier marks.

When you get tired of that rifle let me know. I have taken a liking to non military martial pattern Martini's.

How's the bore.

Gang, I an not really back here yet. I have been lurking all along, but am unalble topost.

I am visiting my son today and have commandeered his computer.

DD
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Pierre
O/R
Joined: 22 Oct 2002, 20:05

22 Oct 2002, 13:05 #5

Hi Double D
Unfortunatly the bore is not so good

Still tryng to clean it up, it will be a winter project to try and salvage it with the lapping method

Has anyone used what they used to call "freshing" the rifling in the muzzleloading days or is there a product that can safely dissolve the rust
It still shoots well but its very hard to clean afterwards as I always get rust color on the patches
Thanks for your help

Pierre
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04 Nov 2002, 23:21 #6

HI.Ihave many Martini and Enfield old guns and old swords.If any one want to buy then mail me for more information on this address(inam_javed@hotmail.com)
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Ian
Veteran of the Regiment
Ian
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Joined: 18 Mar 2002, 01:27

06 Nov 2002, 19:47 #7

Pierre welcome , I use Hoppe's No9 bore solvent and a bronze or stainless brush depending how bad it is before the lapping the brush seems to get into the corners of the grooves and it's amazing how much rust and crud it will remove , when you see the light at the end of the tunnel so to speak all the elbow grease will be worth it . Lapping is a long process requiring lots of patience of which i have little but it works and is the same as freshing only you dont need a rifling machine. cheers Ian.
It's not so much the size of the hole but where it is
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newtire
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Joined: 28 Sep 2017, 12:00

27 Oct 2017, 03:10 #8

Pierre wrote: Hi Double D
Unfortunatly the bore is not so good

Still tryng to clean it up, it will be a winter project to try and salvage it with the lapping method

Has anyone used what they used to call "freshing" the rifling in the muzzleloading days or is there a product that can safely dissolve the rust
It still shoots well but its very hard to clean afterwards as I always get rust color on the patches
Thanks for your help

Pierre
Hi Pierre,  I have done the "freshing out" on a Remington Barrelled Target rifle that belonged to my great Grandpa.  One of my machine shop instructors instructed me how to make a cutter tool using a piece of an old file.  The rifling was square bottomed.  The cutter was a form  tool shaped like a chainsaw tooth.  I embedded this into a 3/8" dowel rod, which fit perfectly in the .40- ish bore.  I made it just shy of the width of the rifling groove.  I was very careful to shim underneath just a little at a time (using paper).  I then slowly moved it into the bore and pulled it back out a few inches at a time.  I worked on it over the next couple of weeks, a little bit at a time, until I finally began to pull out clean steel shavings.  When I first started, the barrel was pretty rough but after I finished cutting and running patches in & out with valve grinding paste, the patched balls went down in one smooth push.  The group size tightened up to a more respectable size also.  This process is not for anyone in a hurry but something to peck away at a little at a time.  It sure worked on that old rifle and I learned a lot.  My brother got to shoot it this summer & it brought back memories of our youth trying to lift that rifle as little kids up at my Grandma's house under the watchful eyes of Dad & all our uncles.
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