New singles: Zeroes / Beat Of Your Drum (2018) (Radio Edit) released

Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

10:39 PM - Jul 19, 2018 #1

Released today is the digital and MP3 version of DAVID BOWIE's new single Zeroes (2018) (Radio Edit).

Purchase here for a mere 99p

All set for release via Parlophone on 7th September is the double A side limited edition 'Zeroes'/'Beat Of Your Drum' 7" picture disc single.

Never Let Me Down (2018) is a new production of Bowie's final 'solo' album of the '80s. Producer Mario McNulty worked on the tracks at Electric Lady Studios in New York with long-time Bowie musicians Sterling Campbell (drums), Reeves Gabrels (guitars), David Torn (guitars) and Tim Lefebvre on bass.

More details and information on BW News
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Joined: 8:16 AM - Oct 15, 2003

3:56 AM - Jul 20, 2018 #2

I like it alot. It definitely adds new life to it.
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But he didn't know from shit
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Joined: 4:16 PM - Aug 27, 2012

10:41 AM - Jul 20, 2018 #3

ziggythecowboy wrote: I like it alot. It definitely adds new life to it.
Me too - and I loathe the original version of the album. The new mix of 'Zeroes' sounds more like a proper db track, almost as though it belongs on 'Buddha of Suburbia'.
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Joined: 8:03 PM - Jan 08, 2013

7:51 PM - Jul 20, 2018 #4

Great version, I have high hopes for the reworked album. 
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Joined: 7:01 PM - Jan 14, 2016

3:30 PM - Jul 21, 2018 #5

Yeah, a great improvement
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

12:56 PM - Jul 24, 2018 #6

LuisKantor wrote:

Me too - and I loathe the original version of the album. The new mix of 'Zeroes' sounds more like a proper db track, almost as though it belongs on 'Buddha of Suburbia'.
Like you I also loath the original version, however unlike you and others it would seem this new one really doesn't improve on it for me. NLMD along with Tonight was major folly from Bowie. Let’s be really honest here everyone and take the rose tinted specs off with regards to this being a different and new take on Zeroes, no amount of tinkering with this track or the rest of the tracks on NLMD or indeed Tonight is ever going to improve things

Also I can’t agree with your observation that this new reworked version of Zeroes could ever belong on Buddha of Suburbia to be honest. Your hearing something that I can’t? Which if you are, fair play to you I suppose
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 2:29 PM - Oct 01, 2017

7:42 PM - Jul 24, 2018 #7

I still regularly listen to NLMD the album, which cannot be said of any other post 1990 Bowie album I'm afraid. I do listen to Buddha sometimes, but the rest I hardly play in full, and that includes TND and BS. I do play songs of these albums off the many greatest hits compilations, but not the albums as a whole. I think I even listen to Tonight more frequently than Earthling, Hours, BTWN, Heathen, Outside and TMII taken together...

The last really great Bowie song for me is Strangers when we meet (the Outside version). After that it all became too much AOR (with the exception of Earthling which sounds terribly dated, way more than Tonight); still great lyrically, but melodically not my cup of tea and too much focused on mid-tempo songs. 
Last edited by oakey1973 on 4:46 PM - Jul 25, 2018, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 9:49 AM - Apr 20, 2012

2:26 PM - Jul 25, 2018 #8

oakey1973 wrote:The last real great Bowie song fo me is Strangers when we meet (the Outside version).
Agreed, actually. There were other good songs after that, including a few really good ones - but truly 'great' ones? Not so much.
Strangers When We Meet probably really is the last of them.
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Joined: 4:04 PM - Apr 20, 2014

10:55 PM - Jul 25, 2018 #9

Disagree guys , how about , Survive, Something in the Air, Slowburn,Slip Away, I could be your slave, etc , there are more later gems than you think , delve a bit more !
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Joined: 4:04 PM - Apr 20, 2014

10:59 PM - Jul 25, 2018 #10

LuisKantor , i do agree about rose coloured specs, that is one major fault that some Bowie fans have, everything hes done is great when its not, every artist has his/her faults, although Bowie had a lot less than others !
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Joined: 2:29 PM - Oct 01, 2017

6:18 AM - Jul 26, 2018 #11

west406 wrote:Disagree guys , how about , Survive, Something in the Air, Slowburn,Slip Away, I could be your slave, etc , there are more later gems than you think , delve a bit more !
Nope, these all fall in the AOR mid-tempo category for me.

Songs that are good but not great after 1995 include I’m afraid of Americans, Seven and Everyone says hi and some but not most songs off TND (Valentine’s day, Love is lost) and BS (title track).

I enjoy listening to Tonight (the song) or Beat of your drum more than to let’s say Sue or Dirty boys)
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

11:57 AM - Jul 26, 2018 #12

oakey1973 wrote: I enjoy listening to Tonight (the song) or Beat of your drum more than to let’s say Sue or Dirty boys)
Seriously?
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 9:53 AM - Jul 07, 2018

11:53 PM - Jul 26, 2018 #13

Is there a scientific method that can cut through all of this subjectivity? Personally, Buddha, Mysteries, about 50% of Outside, Satellites, Survive, Seven, 50% of Heathen, 40% of Reality and 70% of TND, are great. Blackstar (the album) is outstanding and was my gateway to Kendrick Lamar. Of course this is all subjective. The "rose coloured glasses" is an interesting concept. Much that I love Dylan and Neil Young, and so many others, I don't need multiple copies of the same song as I do with Bowie. He has a presence in his music that I've never been able to get enough of.
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Joined: 8:16 AM - Oct 15, 2003

12:43 AM - Jul 27, 2018 #14

I always liked the way that Beat of Your Drum starts. With an ice cold delivery. Until it got to the chorus then it goes all bouncy and happy. It will be interesting to hear what happens to that one.
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"Suspected of being a shoulder surfer
But he didn't know from shit
About challenge response systems"

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Joined: 8:22 PM - Jul 24, 2008

8:31 PM - Jul 27, 2018 #15

oakey1973 wrote:
west406 wrote:Disagree guys , how about , Survive, Something in the Air, Slowburn,Slip Away, I could be your slave, etc , there are more later gems than you think , delve a bit more !
Nope, these all fall in the AOR mid-tempo category for me.

Songs that are good but not great after 1995 include I’m afraid of Americans, Seven and Everyone says hi and some but not most songs off TND (Valentine’s day, Love is lost) and BS (title track).

I enjoy listening to Tonight (the song) or Beat of your drum more than to let’s say Sue or Dirty boys)
Hmm. Is a bit like comparing oranges with lemons but Dollar Days hits me in the gut. Every every time. I think it’s genius 
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Joined: 6:29 PM - Jan 17, 2009

3:21 PM - Jul 29, 2018 #16

This is going to be an interesting experiment: because I came to Bowieworld so late, I’ve never listened to the 80s albums. My version of “Loving The Alien” is the Reality Tour version, rather than the Flock-Of-Seagulls-sounding single, which I loathe.
If that’s any indication of what I missed, I’d have no problem with an update of the NLMD tracks. I hope they also get rid of that awful, cluttered cover.
"Schtum!"
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Joined: 2:29 PM - Oct 01, 2017

8:34 AM - Jul 30, 2018 #17

crackedemerald wrote: This is going to be an interesting experiment: because I came to Bowieworld so late, I’ve never listened to the 80s albums. My version of “Loving The Alien” is the Reality Tour version, rather than the Flock-Of-Seagulls-sounding single, which I loathe.
If that’s any indication of what I missed, I’d have no problem with an update of the NLMD tracks. I hope they also get rid of that awful, cluttered cover.
Well that was the 80s :)

The great thing about Bowie that he has something for everybody. I became 'music conscious' in late 1985 when I was 12, the first Bowie songs I heard were what the radio played (the current hits station and not golden oldies), so I 'grew up' with This is not America, Absolute Beginners and the (albeit minor) hits from NLMD and Tonight (live) which was a number one hit in my country. My budget was very limited so all I could afford were 7" singles and occasionally an LP (NLMD was not among the LPs I bought at the time). Then my musical taste buds started to develop and I became aware of the world of The Cure, Pixies, Pink Floyd, punk, Front 242 and other alternative bands. This was all still on a minimal budget, that is, I had to tape the songs from LPs or CDs from friends or the public library. I also started listening to the British Forces Broadcasting Service (yes, the cold war was still on...) which I could receive in my bedroom (no BBC unfortunately, I live on continental Europe) and they played a lot of British music in the alternative genre. 

Then I got my first CD player in 1990 and started to buy CDs, one every month at most. Bowie was linked to the 'hits phase' of my musical consciousness, but then I learned that he was doing something called Tin Machine, which I found interesting, as it had a punk-ish look and feel that fit well with my 'new' musical taste. And then I heard a Bowie song played on BFBS, because it was released on CD for the first time since years, a song called Starman.... This really blew me away instantly and I became a Bowie-fan. So I had my Starman moment, not as most Brits in 1972, but in 1990 when this song that I did not knew existed was played on the radio. After that I began to delve into Bowie's music at a slow pace that was in sync with my budget (I first taped the ChangesOne and ChangesTwo LPs from the libary, then got the ChangesBowie CD), as I one by one bought the Ryko Bowie CDs when they were released. And I went to see him live, went to a Sound and Vision show with friends and a year later to a TMII concert.

Still, the 80s Bowie was part of these experiences, but mostly through the singles, as these were on ChangesBowie and I already knew the non-Changes 80s singles (This is not America and the NLMD hits). 

I do understand what crackedemerald means though. That is, I grew up in the 80s and have never been a fan of standard 70s rock, and some of the Bowie songs from the 70s I really dislike because of their Status Quo-ish sound, and these include widely known songs like Jean Genie and Suffragette City, and covers like It ain't easy and Let's spend the night together). I really hate these songs and always skip them. Unfortunately Bowie played some of these live until the end, largely ignoring much better songs from the 80s such as This is not America, Absolute beginners, or even songs off NLMD...)

When he said "Oh, to redo that album..." I thought, well you could have played new versions and new arrangements of these songs live over the years, couldn't you? That's why we have live shows. 
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

11:44 AM - Jul 30, 2018 #18

I fully understand the reasons why people who became aware of Bowie during the 80s have an attachment to his 80s work, after all it’s associated with their childhood or youth memories just as Bowie’s 70s output has associations with mine, but leaving that aside, it’s not rocket science to work out that Bowie 70s output was far superior in every way, whether it’s to do with forward thinking music ideas for the time, far superior structure of the songs, sheer music diversity over that decade, Bowie’s images which were vitality important,  to the overall picture, simpler production, ( The 80s music scene was very much overproduced ) even Bowie’s voice was at it most definitive during the 70s, etc,etc.

Put it this way if Bowie had put out his 80s work at the beginning of his career, in other words the 70s never happened and a 70s age Bowie started around 1980, would he have become the mega star he’d did? I’m confident in predicting he wouldn’t have. Let’s face it Bowie’s 80s output was tolerated and got greater recognition because of who he was on the back of his 70s output simple as that.

If the powers that be decided to permanently erase all of Bowie’s 80s work from history like Too Dizzy was, would it really be missed.  

It was a sad sad day when Bowie died but being realistic, David Bowie the true David Bowie the artist not the man, died after Scary Monsters.

Like most revered god like figures he had the odd well worth  resurrection during the mid 90s and towards the very end of his life with TND and Blackstar but be in no doubt the 70s was the real deal David Bowie.

Finally I’ve never heard any of David Bowie work being associated with Status Quo before?

Good God!😀
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 2:29 PM - Oct 01, 2017

2:46 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #19

We all have our own memories of DB music of course. Still, I consider many of his 80s songs vastly superior to most of his post 1990 output. Sure, the 70s Bowie is also my favourite, but I can point out many songs I do not like on each of his pre 1975 albums. The low point for me musically is probably much of TMII, but also much of BTWN, Outside and Earthling to be honest. To me he was much more 'lost' in 1989-1997 than he was in 1980-1988. Scary monsters, the hits of Let's Dance, Loving the alien, When the wind blows, NLMD (the song), the re-recorded Look back in anger, As the world falls down, Underground, Absolute beginners, Cat People (Moroder version), the Baal EP, Under pressure are all really great accomplishments. Compare those to The Motel, Wishful Beginnings, Stateside, Law, Battle for Britain, I am with name, Telling Lies, or Pallas Athena.

But in the 90s we also had Baby Universal, Strangers when we meet and Hallo Spaceboy. Great songs that I still listen to regularly. After that (1996) I find it difficult to point out 'classics'. Listened to Dollar Days today to see whether I missed someing, but no, the Space Oddity-like beginning is nice, but the rest is again one of those mid tempo songs that form the majority on all all his post 1997 albums. Nicholas Pegg also considers Dollar Days a masterpiece in the vein of Life on Mars. Well, I beg to differ, sorry.

In the end it's all a matter of personal taste of course...
Rebel Rebel is also one of my Status Quo skippers by the way :)
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

5:12 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #20

What I find interesting about conversations like this is just what does David Bowie mean to 80s Bowie fans like yourself. Your right of course no one can tell you what you should or shouldn’t like but as a 70s kid who was touched by Bowie in that golden Bowie decade it just seems to me your smitten with a kind of false Bowie clone / imposter albeit one of Bowies own creation.  

To say you prefer things from his 80s work over some of the things his did during the 70s whilst no doubt sincerely meant, and to say you prefer some of his 80s work over some things he did during 1.Outside, Buddha, The Next Day & Blackstar, albums that did manage to recapture that certain Bowie DNA is to miss the whole point of David Bowie entirely.

Maybe you just had to be there.
Last edited by SHHWEEET! on 6:53 PM - Jul 30, 2018, edited 2 times in total.
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

5:19 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #21

Deleted posted twice, sorry about that
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 2:29 PM - Oct 01, 2017

6:50 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #22

SHHWEEET! wrote: What I find interesting about conversations like this is just what does David Bowie mean to 80s Bowie fans like yourself. Your right of course no one can tell you what you should or shouldn’t like but as a 70s kid who was touched by Bowie in that golden Bowie decade it just seems to me your smitten with a kind of false Bowie clone / imposter albeit one of Bowies own creation.  

To say you prefer anything from his 80s work over anything his did during the 70s whilst no doubt sincerely meant, and to say you prefer some of his 80s work over things he did during 1.Outside, Buddha, The Next Day & Blackstar, albums that did manage to recapture that certain Bowie DNA is to miss the whole point of David Bowie entirely.

Maybe you just had to be there.
Well I was there from 1990 onwards, saw all his tours and Reality twice, the second Amsterdam show was only followed by a handful before he retired from performing live altogether. Don't get me wrong, the 70s Bowie is the best, and in the 1990s I very much enjoyed his music, live and in my living room. I just feel much of his 1990 work has not held up well. I very much liked Earthling at the time, now I find it hard to listen to as its production is very dated. Same for Outside, I appreciated the return to avant garde but to be honest, live on stage I much more enjoyed the oldies than his current work, with some exceptions (Strangers, Spaceboy). 
Last edited by oakey1973 on 8:26 PM - Aug 08, 2018, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

7:01 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #23

Out of interest do you prefer his live 80s concerts like Serious Moonlight, Glass Spider over his 90s concerts like his 1. Outside tour ( with or without NIN ) Earthling tour, not to mention his 50th birthday bash at Maddison Square Garden, also do you prefer the original album Hallo Spaceboy or the remix with the Pet Shop Boys.

Btw I edited my previous reply to more accurately represent what you said
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 2:29 PM - Oct 01, 2017

7:31 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #24

SHHWEEET! wrote: Out of interest do you prefer his live 80s concerts like Serious Moonlight, Glass Spider over his 90s concerts like his 1. Outside tour ( with or without NIN ) Earthling tour, not to mention his 50th birthday bash at Maddison Square Garden?

Btw I edited my previous reply to more accurately represent what you said
(Sorry, but this Tapatalk app is a mess on my ipad, cannot edit some of the lines so had to get my laptop; my post was not finished yet)

I did not attend the SM and GS ours, of course watched them on video and later DVD. I'm pretty sure they would have made a great experience. But to answer your question, I do prefer the 1990s/2000s shows.

Of those I attended, the Outside show was probably the best. The Earthling show was the most intimate (in a small venue in Utrecht), Reality 1st show (Rotterdam) comes very close too, but I was not that close to the stage, the second Reality show (Amsterdam) was in a big stadium with not great sound, but special since it was the last and he played Sister Midnight and Station to Station... TMII was the worst (still enjoyed it though, same venue as Earthling but worse seats). The most special of the concerts (albeit not the best from an artistic view, meaning mostly the song performances with the 4-piece band) remains S&V, because it was the first one I attended, I was very close to the stage and to see this Artist whom I just had discovered entering the stage, playing Space Oddity, wearing tons of make up, that is a moment I will never forget :-) The projections were also great, I would really like to see this S&V tour released on DVD. I also attended the Lazarus show in London btw.

Sure, I know none of these shows can beat Hammersmith 72, Earls Court 78, Nassau Coliseum 1976, or Tampa 1974, but I simply was not there. 

I *do* get the Bowie DNA though, that is a bit of an arrogant statement (no offence though, we are on a forum discussing everything DB :)). It's just that from a musical perspective, Hours, Heathen, Reality and TND are very traditional in my view and also in more or less the same style (guitar-driven mid tempo songs, with similar arrangements/production). Blackstar is musically very different, but too jazzy for me as a whole; it is special because it is his last album. I also prefer some of the bonus tracks of TND and BS more than the actual album tracks. TM-I to Earthling are not very traditional musically, but like I said partly dated and partly hampered by poor songwriting. For instance, I like the concept of Outside, the David Lynch-like atmosphere, don't get me wrong, but I listened to it the other day and it is also very pretentious and some parts are hard to listen to, simply because they are not great.

In contrast, I do enjoy much (not all!) of his 80s work. Of course, songs like Too dizzy, Shake it, I keep forgetting, Dancing with the big boys, and NY's in love (that rap!) are cringeworthy and my Rebel Rebel statement was a bit too bold (although it is not one of my favourites, neither is "Heroes" but that's also because these songs are overplayed and overheard in a way). But I really miss the 'pop Bowie' (or maybe 'song Bowie' is a better label) in much of his later work: the melodies, the arrangements, the production, the lyrics, creating songs that really stand out. Starman strikes me as a song, so does Life on Mars, Station to Station, Space Oddity, Joe the Lion, Alladin Sane, Loving the Alien, Sound and Vision, This is not America, Up the hill backwards, or John I'm only dancing. I don't have that same feeling with Dollar Days or Slow burn.

And I'm looking forward to hearing NLMD in its revised form.
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

8:43 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #25

Thanks for your honest reply’s. Of course I wasn’t trying to be deliberately arrogant with the Bowie DNA thing, I was merely using that to try and get my point across albeit I appreciate rather clumsily.

It’s been a blast reading your thoughts though even though I will have to agree to disagree with you on some things.

With regards to the new revised NLMD it will be interesting to hear what they have done with it, but to be honest I’m more excited about finally getting an official CD release of a Serious Moonlight show at long last when it gets released as a stand alone breakout from the box set.
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 2:29 PM - Oct 01, 2017

9:39 PM - Jul 30, 2018 #26

SHHWEEET! wrote:Thanks for your honest reply’s. Of course I wasn’t trying to be deliberately arrogant with the Bowie DNA thing, I was merely using that to try and get my point across albeit I appreciate rather clumsily.

It’s been a blast reading your thoughts though even though I will have to agree to disagree with you on some things.

With regards to the new revised NLMD it will be interesting to hear what they have done with it, but to be honest I’m more excited about finally getting an official CD release of a Serious Moonlight show at long last when it gets released as a stand alone breakout from the box set.
Great to have the SM show on CD but I don’t have high hopes for the sound quality. I was never impressed by the VHS or DVD audio and believe the Let’s Dance live version from the RSD 12” is from that show. That one also does not sound great, probably the same mix as will be used for the CD.
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Joined: 7:09 AM - Aug 20, 2002

5:11 AM - Jul 31, 2018 #27

The release blurb for the box set states that the Serious Moonlight, Glass Spider, Dance and Recall discs are exclusive to the Box set. So I doubt they will appear as Break-Outs later on.
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

5:40 AM - Jul 31, 2018 #28

besomdave wrote: The release blurb for the box set states that the Serious Moonlight, Glass Spider, Dance and Recall discs are exclusive to the Box set. So I doubt they will appear as Break-Outs later on.

That’s bad news if true.

I just assumed the SM & GS discs would be made available separately because live albums had been made available from the previous box sets.

I must say it would be a silly decision not to make them available separately, not everyone can afford or even wants these overpriced fan fleecing box sets, therefore even a sale of one CD as a breakout is better than no sale at.

Maybe Parlophone are too cash rich bank balance wise to care? Very nice for them if they are.

Guess I’m just going to have to be content with cherry picking the digital version, and that Serious Moonlight bootleg double CD that’s shortly going to be available on Amazon.
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 6:29 PM - Jan 17, 2009

11:36 PM - Jul 31, 2018 #29

It's funny, because I heard Early Bowie (pre-'Hunky Dory') and Late Bowie (for my purposes, Post-80s and Post-Tin Machine) at about the same time, and to my taste, I like Late Bowie better. It's denser, to my ear more concerned with musical than lyrical expression. Whatever...more to my taste, so it will be interesting to hear the redone tracks and see where they fall.

All that being said, the best is still the best: "Hunky Dory" to "Scary Monsters" is unassailable.
"Schtum!"
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Joined: 1:22 PM - Apr 21, 2013

7:57 AM - Aug 07, 2018 #30

oakey1973 wrote:
The last really great Bowie song for me is Strangers when we meet (the Outside version). After that it all became too much AOR (with the exception of Earthling which sounds terribly dated, way more than Tonight); still great lyrically, but melodically not my cup of tea and too much focused on mid-tempo songs. 
Strangers (Outside version) is my favourite song of all time by anyone. It is perfect.
Stephen
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Joined: 11:23 AM - Mar 08, 2006

6:06 PM - Aug 18, 2018 #31

Being a bit of a tech freak in the 80's/90's and had a stereo VHS machine I ripped the Audio from both the SM and GS Videos straight to cassette tape. When I bought a DVD recorder in late 90's did the same then ripped the audio from those. I still have them and they sound superb! what really fucked me off was the official DVD releases which were remixed and they sound awful!!
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Joined: 8:13 AM - Jul 22, 2018

7:46 AM - Aug 22, 2018 #32

nightflights wrote: Being a bit of a tech freak in the 80's/90's and had a stereo VHS machine I ripped the Audio from both the SM and GS Videos straight to cassette tape. When I bought a DVD recorder in late 90's did the same then ripped the audio from those. I still have them and they sound superb! what really fucked me off was the official DVD releases which were remixed and they sound awful!!
Your reply has reminded me that I actually own a Pioneer CD recording machine, it became redundant when I got a PC for recording onto CDs.

I no longer own a PC these days, just an iPad and iPhone for surfing the web, so I’m thinking it’s about time said CD recorder should be brought down from the attic and plumbed back into the hifi system.

It should be great to record the sound tracks from all these YouTube videos.

I hope I’ve still got the instructions, it’s been a few years since I’ve used it.
SHHWEEET! IS....A self confessed, radicalised David Bowie knob ha! ha! I’m in good company. Let’s all celebrate together.
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Joined: 1:28 AM - Jan 22, 2013

7:54 PM - Sep 07, 2018 #33

Sorry to crash the party, but I think it remains as bad as it was. you cannot polish a turd.
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Joined: 11:23 AM - Mar 08, 2006

12:36 PM - Sep 14, 2018 #34

My single turned up today in Cyprus in one piece! not sure where the kudos goes? to Amazon for the packaging? Or Cyprus mail for employing people who give a shit for once!
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