Tony Sbarbaro playing trumpet?

Tony Sbarbaro playing trumpet?

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 25th, 2018, 1:58 am #1

In carrying out some research about Artie Seaberg, I came across this photo of the ODJB in late 1922 or early 1923. Tony Sbarbaro playing trumpet?

Left to right: Henry Vanicelli, p; Artie Seaberg, cl; Nick LaRocca, co; Eddie Edwards, tb; and Tony Sbarbaro tp.

ODJBLate22Early23Take3.JPG
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 15th, 2018, 4:56 pm

May 25th, 2018, 3:17 am #2

It looks odd, both his hand placement and the shape of the horn itself. Unusually large bell (compare to LaRocca's). I wonder if it's some novelty cornet with a built in mute ('echo' cornets etc.) which was on hand, like the saxophone on the floor, and offered an opportunity for some prank posing.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 25th, 2018, 1:47 pm #3

From Nick Dellow. Thanks Nick!

Regarding your Bixography Forum post about Tony Sbarbaro - it isn't a trumpet, it is actually a kazoo in the shape of a trumpet! Tony would play the kazoo as a novelty on certain numbers and in fact I established that he plays a kazoo solo on the ODJBs 1921 recording of "Crazy Blues". This is mentioned in part one of my VJM article on Eddie Lang. Previously it was assumed that the solo was by Eddie Edwards using a kazoo mute in his trombone. I thought it was too out of tune to be Edwards, and Mark Berresford (an expert on the ODJB) agreed with me that it is in fact a kazoo solo by Tony Sbarbaro. Incidentally, this is the only ODJB recording that features his kazoo.
P.S. The alto saxophone on the floor in the photo you uploaded was one that Nick LaRocca played occasionally. Not many people know that he could play the sax! Attached is a rare photo (taken a few years earlier) of him holding the sax.

ODJBNickSax.jpg

Incidentally, I think that's the same cornet-shaped kazoo on the floor next to the drum kit. It looks like it has valves but I'm sure these are false and just there to give the impression that it is a 'real' instrument rather than an novelty one. Such novelty kazoos are still made - see:-
[url=http:// [/url]
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 15th, 2018, 4:56 pm

May 25th, 2018, 5:24 pm #4

In the first photograph, the (probable) kazoo seems to have a mute in it. Which would prevent it sitting bell-down on the floor. Sbarbaro could easily have borrowed a mute for a moment. Otherwise it looks to match with the one in the picture from Nick.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 26th, 2018, 9:58 am #5

From  http://rwj-a.stanford.edu/bonus-content ... ve-barbone

"Tony Spargo was a hoot to watch. Once a night he would whip out a kazoo, shaped like a trumpet, and take a kazoo solo. Unbeknownst to him, one evening the band decided to join him. They all whipped out kazoos when his big moment came and helped out, much to Spargo's, and the audience's delight. It became a regular feature."

Thanks to Nick Dellow for  the link and the quote..
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 16th, 2018, 10:44 am

June 14th, 2018, 8:44 am #6

Remarkable!
On this forum, dedicated to Bix, he of the beautiful tone and wonderful melodic gift, you are seriously discussing kazoo solos by a drummer. What next? A discussion of the influence of Red McKenzie's Blue Blowers on the Armstrong Hot Five?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 29th, 2018, 12:06 pm

June 14th, 2018, 11:34 am #7

alexander revell wrote: Remarkable!
On this forum, dedicated to Bix, he of the beautiful tone and wonderful melodic gift, you are seriously discussing kazoo solos by a drummer. What next? A discussion of the influence of Red McKenzie's Blue Blowers on the Armstrong Hot Five?
Listen to Louis Armstrong playing the slide whistle on the Hot Five recording of "Who's It?". In Vintage Jazz Mart 180, another Professor (Bruce Vermazen) ascribes the influence of Art Hickman's slide whistle playing on that of Louis' !
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 16th, 2018, 10:44 am

June 14th, 2018, 1:27 pm #8

Ralph,
You are kidding, of course :-) 
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 29th, 2018, 12:06 pm

June 14th, 2018, 2:15 pm #9

Alex,

I don't say I support Prof. Vermazen's view, but that's what he says:

http://www.vjm.biz/fayte-marable.pdf

See page 6 of the article (page 8 in VJM hardcopy)

Have you read the article, Alex ?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 16th, 2018, 10:44 am

June 14th, 2018, 4:33 pm #10

Ralph, I've read the article. Thanks for giving the link. Very interesting. However, I'd sooner not discuss it with you on this forum, but if you would like to email me at alexrevell47@gmail.com. I'd be happy to give you my thoughts.
Quote
Like
Share