The first great jazz ballad recording of 1927

The first great jazz ballad recording of 1927

David Tenner
David Tenner

October 22nd, 2017, 7:08 am #1

No, it wasn't Bix and Tram playing "Singing the Blues" or "I'm Coming, Virginia."

Rather it was the January 4 Charleston Chasers recording of "Someday, Sweetheart" with Red and Miff... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2goTwEVF38
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 22nd, 2017, 12:56 pm #2

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1219521481

I don't know how I got "That's No Bargain" in there.

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on October 22nd, 2017, 1:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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David Tenner
David Tenner

October 22nd, 2017, 9:08 pm #3

certainly is slower than the Five Pennies version. Compare https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7yLEmN1OHo with https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtFnHCP5lg8

But I still wouldn't call it a ballad.
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Laurie Carr
Laurie Carr

October 25th, 2017, 12:30 pm #4

No, it wasn't Bix and Tram playing "Singing the Blues" or "I'm Coming, Virginia."

Rather it was the January 4 Charleston Chasers recording of "Someday, Sweetheart" with Red and Miff... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2goTwEVF38
Someday Sweetheart by the Charleston Chasers was recorded on 27 January 1927. The 4 January session was rejected. Laurie.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 25th, 2017, 1:40 pm #5

Thanks for the posting.

Albert
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Alan Nellis
Alan Nellis

October 25th, 2017, 1:49 pm #6

Someday Sweetheart by the Charleston Chasers was recorded on 27 January 1927. The 4 January session was rejected. Laurie.
Would King Oliver's 1926 version also be considered a ballad? Haven't posted here for years due to life circumstances but this is a great place to learn and listen!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 25th, 2017, 2:03 pm #7

Here is King Oliver's version:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1012569125555560/

And we might as well listen to Jelly Roll Morton's version:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIUymHyU0tE

Albert
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carl
carl

October 27th, 2017, 7:03 pm #8

No, it wasn't Bix and Tram playing "Singing the Blues" or "I'm Coming, Virginia."

Rather it was the January 4 Charleston Chasers recording of "Someday, Sweetheart" with Red and Miff... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2goTwEVF38
It's nice and slow, but to me it's a long way from what's going on with the Bix thing. Hard to put your finger on it, but to me, it just feels like a different thing. It's a ballad allright, but a jazz ballad? I don't know. Red and the boys, cept for Miff, sound like they're hesitantly having trouble just playing their instruments, and Miff seems just carefully weaving through the song, basically like they're doing, without any conversational eloquence whatsoever. It's nice though. Glad I heard it.

The magic in the Bix one is that it's somehow a conversation, and a two way one at that. He's telling a story and the listener somehow responds and empathasizingly discerns his inner feelings and it feels like we know him, and as well we sense he knows and understands us, speaking to us, speaking for us There's an air of melancholy to the whole thing, too, a precedent for all the great jazz ballads to follow. I think that's the underlying reason we're interested in Bix as a person.

There's the opposite to the Red thing, too, where unlike Red and the boys, Tommy is pouring out his feelings, but somehow it's not a conversation, not a jazz ballad.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQg1wSm1rEM
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James Kidd
James Kidd

October 28th, 2017, 1:29 am #9

To me, the epitome of Jazz balladry is Fletcher Hendersons recording of 'Talk Of The Town' with that superb solo by Hawkins, lush, inventive and unforgettable. What can compare?
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

October 28th, 2017, 7:41 am #10


"It's The Talk Of The Town" is superb, and then there's the slightly earlier "One Hour" by the Mound City Blue Blowers, with Hawkins in equally rhapsodic mood. I think that recording, waxed in November 1929, set the tone for the way ballads were approached by jazz soloists in the 1930s. Hawkins once more set the tone at the end of the decade with "Body And Soul". The man was a genius!

If we trace the lineage back further in time from "One Hour", I do feel that 'ballad' approach - emphasising the jazz soloist in a ballad setting, playing extended solos - really did began with "Singin' The Blues". Other sides made around that time or earlier sound to me like precursors. Or perhaps it's simply because they sound of their time, whereas Bix's solo on "Singin' The Blues" - just as with Hawkins' solo on "One Hour" - is timeless. In this respect, I very much agree with the excellent points Carl makes in the second paragraph of his post higher up in this string.
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