Jardin Royal, Broadway's Newest Dancing Diner

Joined: 12:06 PM - Mar 29, 2018

4:55 PM - Oct 03, 2018 #1

From the Morning Telegraph, 1927-12-08, p.05
 
JARDIN ROYAL, BROADWAY’S NEWEST DANCING DINER
The Jardin Royal, Broadway’s newest dancing and dining place, opened up its doors last night and made its premiere bid for a part of the patronage which even now is not sufficient to go ‘round among the thousand and one night clubs which already infest the district.
Situated on Broadway at Forty-eighth street, on the site of Rector’s, that most famous resort of the era popularly known as “the good old days”, and more recently as the Paul Whiteman Club and the late lamented New Yorker, the Jardin Royal occupies what is probably the choicest location in all New York, but it remains to be seen if the new management can restore the popularity which this corner once enjoyed.
Jimmy Carr (the Doctor of Melody) and his orchestra will dispense the music with the lavishness characteristic of the bespectacled Jimmy, and it is expected, in addition to that, Jimmy will ,act as master of ceremonies.
Ted Reilly has produced a revue composed of six principals and eight ensemble femmes, in which he is featuring Castle & Mays, a personable team of harmony songsters.
C. M. Joe, formerly manager of the Palais d’Or, is managing the Jardin Royal and, if he can repeat the miracle he performed at the Palais, all be well.
(Tomorrow’s paper will contain a detailed account of the opening)
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

6:37 PM - Oct 03, 2018 #2

From http://www.theamericanmenu.com/2015/08/rectors.html
In late 1916, Earl Fuller’s Jazz Band played at Rector’s a few months before the Original Dixieland Jazz Band made its acclaimed debut at Reisenweber’s in January 1917. 

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Joined: 5:01 AM - Mar 17, 2018

5:02 AM - Oct 05, 2018 #3

Standing back row right-most, it looks like Ted Lewis. Two are clarinetists seen, and nowhere a sax.
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Joined: 7:10 PM - Mar 18, 2018

6:10 PM - Oct 05, 2018 #4

I think that the Ted Lewis-like musician in the back row, far right is holding a flute.
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Joined: 5:01 AM - Mar 17, 2018

6:06 AM - Oct 06, 2018 #5

If it isn't a young Ted Lewis, it still looks like him to me [I may have seen this photo in a book somewhere, to be honest... unable to recall more specifically]. Instrumentally speaking, the fingering scheme for a flute is the same as sax - and so a sax player is already halfway there, learning to operate a flute.
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Joined: 7:10 PM - Mar 18, 2018

5:18 PM - Oct 06, 2018 #6

You're right that the flute's fingering system is similar to that of the saxophone. It's also true that a lot of reed players in these bands in the '20s "doubled" (or in the case of some of Whiteman's reed players, "quintupled") on various members of the woodwind family. That person in the photo does look like Ted Lewis, certainly. Ellington's Harry Carney also played flute, as borne out by a 1934 photo of the band, but he never (sadly) recorded on this instrument. I've heard that Bix may have played flugelhorn while with Whiteman. Any thoughts from our members as to whether he may have recorded on flugelhorn?
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

6:46 PM - Oct 06, 2018 #7

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Joined: 8:41 AM - Mar 16, 2018

1:32 PM - Oct 07, 2018 #8

Firstly, Ted Lewis led and played clarinet in Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band. The photo that Albert posted shows Earl Fuller's Celebrated Society Orchestra, which was led by Nat Harris (standing with violin), whose brother Jack is centre, front row holding a violin. Earl Fuller's Rector's Novelty Orchestra made up the triumvirate of outfits under Fuller's control at Rectors on 48th Street and Broadway.

In 1927, Jack Harris sailed to England with several other New York musicians and began a long engagement at the Embassy Club in London. He became one of the top London bandleaders and had a long term - but not always easy-going - business relationship with Ambrose.

Going back to the Ted Lewis look-alikes, the clarinettist standing far right (back row) in the photo of Earl Fuller's Celebrated Society Orchestra doesn't have the "widow's peak" that Ted Lewis possessed.

Regarding Bix and the flugelhorn, one instance where it has been suggested that he MAY be using the instrument is his solo on Whiteman's "China Boy", though personally I think it is more likely to be a cornet with a Derby mute. This is my favourite "post-breakdown" (for want of a better phrase) Bix solo.
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Joined: 7:10 PM - Mar 18, 2018

7:44 PM - Oct 07, 2018 #9

Thanks Albert and Nick for your thoughts and links regarding Bix and the flugelhorn. I agree with Nick that the "China Boy" solo sounds like Bix is playing into a derby hat over his bell. It's great solo and sounds like a solo (along with Bix's solo on "Louisiana") that might have been an influence on Lester Young.
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Joined: 9:40 PM - May 07, 2018

6:28 PM - Oct 08, 2018 #10

Whether derby or flugel--and I vote derby--"China Boy" is some authentic late magic by Bix.  Hoagy thought so.  In Sometimes I Wonder, he included Bix's "China Boy" solo in a small catalogue of wonders that he thought could make up a "digest history" of the period.  I've always thought the solo was a miracle of moods, beginning with Bix playing jaunty licks in the treble and a comical little oompah--like a Davenport German band--in the bass, and then ending, on the tail end an arc of lyricism, with an unexpected modernist phrase worthy of Debussy or Ravel--a little salvo of seemingly mismatched notes that teaches something new about the song that even the composer didn't know (like Bix's alchemy on "Sweet Sue").  The solo itself is a digest history of musical sources, and one of the funniest and most satisfying of Bix's short improvisations.  For me, anyway.
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