Interesting ad in the NAACP's *The Crisis* magazine in January 1923

Interesting ad in the NAACP's *The Crisis* magazine in January 1923

Joined: March 18th, 2018, 7:37 am

June 23rd, 2018, 5:39 am #1

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Joined: March 18th, 2018, 7:37 am

June 23rd, 2018, 5:40 am #2

This ad appeared in the NAACP's *The Crisis* magazine in January 1923. It is symptomatic of a widespread attitude among middle-class African Americans at the time, deploring the popular association of "The Race" with blues and jazz, instead of "good" music...
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Joined: March 15th, 2018, 4:56 pm

June 24th, 2018, 10:10 pm #3

Black Swan employed Fletcher Henderson as a sort of house pianist before he led his own band.

I can't find anything on Antoinette Garnes.

Florence Cole Talbert has left more than a trace:
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Joined: March 15th, 2018, 6:05 am

June 29th, 2018, 4:12 am #4

Is the capitalization in that article courtesy of Donald Trump?

Less snarkily, with respectful reference to another Donald:
Donald Heywood, noted here for the solo AUTUMN LEAVES, was later the composer of I'M COMING VIRGINIA, with lyrics by Will Marion Cook. As Bix devotees, you are no doubt familiar with Bix's wonderful solo in the Frank Trumbauer 1927 recording of I'M COMING VIRGINIA. The song had originally been performed and recorded by Ethel Waters.

Returning to the AUTUMN LEAVES that Donald Heywood recorded: It isn't the song we now identify with that title, which began life as a melody, LES FEUILLES MORTES, by Hungarian-French composer Joseph Korma for inclusion in a 1945 Roland Petit ballet.

That more famous AUTUMN LEAVES is described as "the most important non-American standard" in a history and analysis by Philippe Baudoin in Contemporary Research in Jazz. Available at
https://www.crj-online.org/v4/CRJ-AutumnLeaves.php
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Joined: March 29th, 2018, 12:06 pm

June 29th, 2018, 6:17 pm #5

David Tenner wrote: This ad appeared in the NAACP's *The Crisis* magazine in January 1923. It is symptomatic of a widespread attitude among middle-class African Americans at the time, deploring the popular association of "The Race" with blues and jazz, instead of "good" music...
One small amendement: this advertisement appeared on page 144 of the January 1923 of "The Crisis".

Ralph
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Joined: March 15th, 2018, 6:05 am

Yesterday, 2:31 am #6

David Tenner wrote: This ad appeared in the NAACP's *The Crisis* magazine in January 1923. It is symptomatic of a widespread attitude among middle-class African Americans at the time, deploring the popular association of "The Race" with blues and jazz, instead of "good" music...
I don't disagree but you may be overstating it in this instance. Black Swan, based in Harlem, always stressed it was black owned and featured black artists. The company catalog included classically oriented records along with blues and jazz. Yet Black Swan encountered resistance from distributors who believed the company lacked an audience for anything other than blues & jazz. So Black Swan placed an ad urging THE CRISIS readers to correct that impression.

One of Black Swan's investors, W.E.B. Dubois, was also the founder of THE CRISIS, which I think is still in print. For the rest of its independent life (not very long) Black Swan would continue to place ads in THE CRISIS for blues and jazz records, too. It didn't disdain the foundation it had created.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

Yesterday, 7:10 pm #7

Coscannon wrote: Is the capitalization in that article courtesy of Donald Trump?

Less snarkily, with respectful reference to another Donald:
Donald Heywood, noted here for the solo AUTUMN LEAVES, was later the composer of I'M COMING VIRGINIA, with lyrics by Will Marion Cook. As Bix devotees, you are no doubt familiar with Bix's wonderful solo in the Frank Trumbauer 1927 recording of I'M COMING VIRGINIA. The song had originally been performed and recorded by Ethel Waters.

Returning to the AUTUMN LEAVES that Donald Heywood recorded: It isn't the song we now identify with that title, which began life as a melody, LES FEUILLES MORTES, by Hungarian-French composer Joseph Korma for inclusion in a 1945 Roland Petit ballet.

That more famous AUTUMN LEAVES is described as "the most important non-American standard" in a history and analysis by Philippe Baudoin in Contemporary Research in Jazz. Available at
https://www.crj-online.org/v4/CRJ-AutumnLeaves.php
"Hungarian-French composer Joseph Korma"  Not
 Korma, Kosma.
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