If you were in Toulouse, ....

If you were in Toulouse, ....

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 29th, 2017, 1:44 pm #1

.... France on June 19, 1928 at 12:45 local time and you turned the radio on, you could hear Bix and Tram (four recordings!). From Le Journal, June 19, 1928.

https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/ ... e=5A6EBDD8

Albert
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Andrew J. Sammut
Andrew J. Sammut

October 29th, 2017, 2:30 pm #2

I know that plenty of American bands broadcasted live on the radio during the twenties and the swing era, but did radio stations also play recordings (like we are used to today)?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 29th, 2017, 3:44 pm #3

.... France on June 19, 1928 at 12:45 local time and you turned the radio on, you could hear Bix and Tram (four recordings!). From Le Journal, June 19, 1928.

https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/ ... e=5A6EBDD8

Albert
.... on Oct 12, 1931 (I was there but about 6 months old and did not know about Bix yet ) and listened to Radio Paris at 12:30, you could hear Bix and Tram's "Jubilee."
From L'Ouest-Éclair ( journal quotidien d'informations, politique, littéraire, commercial) of Oct 12, 1931.
Two remarkable points:
- Number One - that Bix and Tram recordings were played over the radio in France in the late 20s and early 30s.
- Number Two - That more than 80 years later we can find the pertinent documentation: the miracle of the internet.AND of the people who take the time to upload material.

https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/ ... e=5AAE94C6

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on October 29th, 2017, 9:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Fred
Fred

October 29th, 2017, 7:46 pm #4

I know that plenty of American bands broadcasted live on the radio during the twenties and the swing era, but did radio stations also play recordings (like we are used to today)?
Definitely, radio has always broadcast some music from popular record, not to mention recorded commercials.

Cesar Petrillo was a powerful figure in Musician's Union activity, U.S. mid-1900s. One of the Bunny Berigan biography books (perhaps there is only one... library browsing recollection here) recounts a meeting in Petrillo's offices, when one of Berigan's big band efforts folded. A memorable description, it conjured the Union Boss.
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Cliff Preiss
Cliff Preiss

October 29th, 2017, 7:51 pm #5

I know that plenty of American bands broadcasted live on the radio during the twenties and the swing era, but did radio stations also play recordings (like we are used to today)?
In the United States, musicians' unions did all they could to keep recordings from displacing the work of live musicians in the radio industry; just like they're now working to keep recordings and other technologies from replacing live musicians on Broadway.

An exception were transcription recordings--recordings made specifically for broadcast--and there are many great examples of these, both by the great swing bands and by bands that became popular in the revival of early jazz styles in the 1940s.

By the 1940s, disc jockeys as individual personalities had developed, mostly playing the hits of the moment. An exception was Art Hodes, who had a program on WNYC on which he played "vintage" jazz recordings. In live radio, Orson Wells' program in 1944 featured a band of New Orleans jazz masters.
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Fred
Fred

October 29th, 2017, 7:51 pm #6

Definitely, radio has always broadcast some music from popular record, not to mention recorded commercials.

Cesar Petrillo was a powerful figure in Musician's Union activity, U.S. mid-1900s. One of the Bunny Berigan biography books (perhaps there is only one... library browsing recollection here) recounts a meeting in Petrillo's offices, when one of Berigan's big band efforts folded. A memorable description, it conjured the Union Boss.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R99GaVZ_6Rs
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 29th, 2017, 8:14 pm #7

I know that plenty of American bands broadcasted live on the radio during the twenties and the swing era, but did radio stations also play recordings (like we are used to today)?
From http://earlyradiohistory.us/sec018.htm
As radio broadcasting began to establish itself as an ongoing public service, there were questions about the types of stations and kinds of programming they would offer. In Concerning "Canned Music Now Broadcast" from the September, 1922, Radio Dealer, George H. Fisher came to the defense of small stations like WHAW in Tampa, Florida, whose programming consisted almost entirely of phonograph records.

The networks and important radio stations had broadcasts with the well-known bands and singers of the time: Whiteman, the Ipana Troubadours, Rudy Vallee, etc. I believe the radio stations in small towns relied on recordings.

This article is relevant to the early 1920s. I don't know how much is applicable to the late 1920s.

http://earlyradiohistory.us/1922can.htm

Albert
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David Tenner
David Tenner

October 29th, 2017, 8:41 pm #8

Dinah Washignton--"Record Ban Blues" (recorded December 30, 1947)

Talked to a lyric writer
He was trying to put a song across
He asked when I'd record again
I said, Petrillo's the boss

I've got the record ban blues
Yes, I've got those record ban blues
I've got those record ban blues
And I'm paying some awful dues

Thirty-first of December
Was my last recording date
Started out real early
Didn't get through till real late

I've got the record ban blues
Yes, I've got those record ban blues
I've got those record ban blues
Boy, and I'm paying some real heavy dues

I wanted to make another side
And boy, the tune was grand
The union man said,
Go ahead,
But you'll have to do it without the band

I've got the record ban blues
Yes, I've got those record ban blues
Ooh wee, got the record ban blues
And I'm paying some awful dues

Now you heard my story
And that's the way it goes
So don't ask me when I'll record again
Because only Petrillo knows

I've got the record ban blues
Yes, I've got the record ban blues
I've got the record ban blues
And I'm paying some awful dues

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vfeo-2SbXeU

Recorded just before the 1948 ban. Nice trumpet by Cootie Williams, by the way.


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