Emmett/Emmet Hardy

Emmett/Emmet Hardy

Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

July 14th, 2017, 4:26 pm #1


There is an interesting five page article on Emmett Hardy, entitled "The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy", by David Butters in the latest "Frog Blues & Jazz Annual" (Vol 5)( www.frog-records.co.uk ). Amongst the many details provided about Hardy's short life is the fact that he was named Emmet by his parents and added the second t himself (for reasons given in the article, which I won't go into here). Several photographs were new to me.

Needless to say, Bix is mentioned several times. Somewhat controversially, Butters states "...it is admitted by all that of the two men, Hardy, six months Beiderbecke's junior, was by far the more advanced player at the time." The time was 1921, incidentally, and Monk Hazel, Paul Mares and Leon Roppolo (via Benny Goodman) are amongst those stated to have said that Hardy was the greater musician. Jimmy Dorsey is quoted as saying that "Bix often commented on Hardy and how terrific a musician he was". However, statements made by both Nick LaRocca and Steve Brown when asked about Emmett Hardy would suggest that Hardy was unlikely to have been a great influence on Bix. George Brunis' comment about Hardy, given in an interview, that "Bix liked him" is probably as close to the truth as we're likely to get! The comments by LaRocca, Brown and Brunis can be found in posts on this Forum (they are not given in the article).

A letter allegedly sent by Bix to Hardy's mother upon Emmett's death is mentioned in the article. The four-page letter, now presumed lost (if it ever existed), is stated to have ended with the sentences "Emmett was the greatest musician I ever heard. If ever I can come near to your son's greatness I'll die happy". Evidence for the existence of this letter (and also one from Louis Armstrong), and whom it was who passed on the details of its contents, is not provided. The author states that there is no reason to doubt its existence, but with such tenuous connections and no hard historical evidence - in fact, no evidence at all except hearsay - the alleged contents should be treated with caution in my estimation.

"The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy" certainly seems an apposite title for the article.


Nick

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 14th, 2017, 8:33 pm #2

.... you have to purchase volume 5, not available online?

https://www.frog-records.co.uk/products ... the-78-era

£32.00 GBP!

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2017, 12:10 am #3

There is an interesting five page article on Emmett Hardy, entitled "The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy", by David Butters in the latest "Frog Blues & Jazz Annual" (Vol 5)( www.frog-records.co.uk ). Amongst the many details provided about Hardy's short life is the fact that he was named Emmet by his parents and added the second t himself (for reasons given in the article, which I won't go into here). Several photographs were new to me.

Needless to say, Bix is mentioned several times. Somewhat controversially, Butters states "...it is admitted by all that of the two men, Hardy, six months Beiderbecke's junior, was by far the more advanced player at the time." The time was 1921, incidentally, and Monk Hazel, Paul Mares and Leon Roppolo (via Benny Goodman) are amongst those stated to have said that Hardy was the greater musician. Jimmy Dorsey is quoted as saying that "Bix often commented on Hardy and how terrific a musician he was". However, statements made by both Nick LaRocca and Steve Brown when asked about Emmett Hardy would suggest that Hardy was unlikely to have been a great influence on Bix. George Brunis' comment about Hardy, given in an interview, that "Bix liked him" is probably as close to the truth as we're likely to get! The comments by LaRocca, Brown and Brunis can be found in posts on this Forum (they are not given in the article).

A letter allegedly sent by Bix to Hardy's mother upon Emmett's death is mentioned in the article. The four-page letter, now presumed lost (if it ever existed), is stated to have ended with the sentences "Emmett was the greatest musician I ever heard. If ever I can come near to your son's greatness I'll die happy". Evidence for the existence of this letter (and also one from Louis Armstrong), and whom it was who passed on the details of its contents, is not provided. The author states that there is no reason to doubt its existence, but with such tenuous connections and no hard historical evidence - in fact, no evidence at all except hearsay - the alleged contents should be treated with caution in my estimation.

"The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy" certainly seems an apposite title for the article.


Nick
1910 two ts https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1 ... cc=1727033
1920 one t https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1 ... cc=1488411 machinist shop apprentice

Two ts in Findagrave https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.c ... 143&df=all&

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2017, 8:18 pm #4

There is an interesting five page article on Emmett Hardy, entitled "The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy", by David Butters in the latest "Frog Blues & Jazz Annual" (Vol 5)( www.frog-records.co.uk ). Amongst the many details provided about Hardy's short life is the fact that he was named Emmet by his parents and added the second t himself (for reasons given in the article, which I won't go into here). Several photographs were new to me.

Needless to say, Bix is mentioned several times. Somewhat controversially, Butters states "...it is admitted by all that of the two men, Hardy, six months Beiderbecke's junior, was by far the more advanced player at the time." The time was 1921, incidentally, and Monk Hazel, Paul Mares and Leon Roppolo (via Benny Goodman) are amongst those stated to have said that Hardy was the greater musician. Jimmy Dorsey is quoted as saying that "Bix often commented on Hardy and how terrific a musician he was". However, statements made by both Nick LaRocca and Steve Brown when asked about Emmett Hardy would suggest that Hardy was unlikely to have been a great influence on Bix. George Brunis' comment about Hardy, given in an interview, that "Bix liked him" is probably as close to the truth as we're likely to get! The comments by LaRocca, Brown and Brunis can be found in posts on this Forum (they are not given in the article).

A letter allegedly sent by Bix to Hardy's mother upon Emmett's death is mentioned in the article. The four-page letter, now presumed lost (if it ever existed), is stated to have ended with the sentences "Emmett was the greatest musician I ever heard. If ever I can come near to your son's greatness I'll die happy". Evidence for the existence of this letter (and also one from Louis Armstrong), and whom it was who passed on the details of its contents, is not provided. The author states that there is no reason to doubt its existence, but with such tenuous connections and no hard historical evidence - in fact, no evidence at all except hearsay - the alleged contents should be treated with caution in my estimation.

"The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy" certainly seems an apposite title for the article.


Nick
.... to publish it in toto here. Right?

Albert
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

July 16th, 2017, 12:37 am #5


That is correct.

I realise that in this Internet age there is much that is freely available online, but it would be impossible to publish the Frog Annual - or any part of it - gratis. The cost of the high quality printing, as well as the postage costs, are substantial (there are other costs too) and these have to be recouped somehow, since the Annual contains hardly any paid-for advertising, so a cover charge is necessary. The compilation of the Annual (which totals over 200 A4 pages) is certainly a labour of love and I can't see any mainstream publisher taking on such a task - it just wouldn't be worth it financially.

The cover price may be outside the budget of some people, which is unfortunate, but the Annual is still worth every penny. It contains numerous original articles (such as the one on Hardy), as well as reproductions of news items and illustrations from contemporary newspapers, magazines and other sources (such as record company catalogues and advertisements), some of them in colour, and there are lots of superb rare photos too. Plus there is a 26 track CD.

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 16th, 2017, 1:51 pm #6

There is an interesting five page article on Emmett Hardy, entitled "The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy", by David Butters in the latest "Frog Blues & Jazz Annual" (Vol 5)( www.frog-records.co.uk ). Amongst the many details provided about Hardy's short life is the fact that he was named Emmet by his parents and added the second t himself (for reasons given in the article, which I won't go into here). Several photographs were new to me.

Needless to say, Bix is mentioned several times. Somewhat controversially, Butters states "...it is admitted by all that of the two men, Hardy, six months Beiderbecke's junior, was by far the more advanced player at the time." The time was 1921, incidentally, and Monk Hazel, Paul Mares and Leon Roppolo (via Benny Goodman) are amongst those stated to have said that Hardy was the greater musician. Jimmy Dorsey is quoted as saying that "Bix often commented on Hardy and how terrific a musician he was". However, statements made by both Nick LaRocca and Steve Brown when asked about Emmett Hardy would suggest that Hardy was unlikely to have been a great influence on Bix. George Brunis' comment about Hardy, given in an interview, that "Bix liked him" is probably as close to the truth as we're likely to get! The comments by LaRocca, Brown and Brunis can be found in posts on this Forum (they are not given in the article).

A letter allegedly sent by Bix to Hardy's mother upon Emmett's death is mentioned in the article. The four-page letter, now presumed lost (if it ever existed), is stated to have ended with the sentences "Emmett was the greatest musician I ever heard. If ever I can come near to your son's greatness I'll die happy". Evidence for the existence of this letter (and also one from Louis Armstrong), and whom it was who passed on the details of its contents, is not provided. The author states that there is no reason to doubt its existence, but with such tenuous connections and no hard historical evidence - in fact, no evidence at all except hearsay - the alleged contents should be treated with caution in my estimation.

"The Enigma That Was Emmet Hardy" certainly seems an apposite title for the article.


Nick
....http://www.crj-online.org/v4/CRJ-BixNewOrleans.php

but no mention of Bix's letter to Hardy's mother.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 16th, 2017, 2:16 pm #7

I wrote this 13 years ago!!!

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/999394973

Albert
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Bob Spoo
Bob Spoo

July 18th, 2017, 7:14 pm #8

That is correct.

I realise that in this Internet age there is much that is freely available online, but it would be impossible to publish the Frog Annual - or any part of it - gratis. The cost of the high quality printing, as well as the postage costs, are substantial (there are other costs too) and these have to be recouped somehow, since the Annual contains hardly any paid-for advertising, so a cover charge is necessary. The compilation of the Annual (which totals over 200 A4 pages) is certainly a labour of love and I can't see any mainstream publisher taking on such a task - it just wouldn't be worth it financially.

The cover price may be outside the budget of some people, which is unfortunate, but the Annual is still worth every penny. It contains numerous original articles (such as the one on Hardy), as well as reproductions of news items and illustrations from contemporary newspapers, magazines and other sources (such as record company catalogues and advertisements), some of them in colour, and there are lots of superb rare photos too. Plus there is a 26 track CD.
I wouldn't go so far as to say that publishing "any part" of the piece would be copyright infringement. Reproducing reasonably short portions for the purpose of discussing them on this list (frequently done by this group) would likely be a transformative fair use under US copyright law.
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Phil Schaap
Phil Schaap

July 18th, 2017, 10:17 pm #9

Three years after Emmett Hardy's death, a person named "MARTHA" put a memoriam in the New Orleans Times-Picayune for Hardy. The name does match the given name of the women relatives. Might Monk Hazel's oral history at Tulane or, perhaps, the tapes of another contemporary of Hardy mentioned "Martha"?
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

July 18th, 2017, 10:43 pm #10


It was Martha Boswell, of Boswell Sisters fame.

According to the article, Martha met and fell in love with Emmett in New Orleans but "No romance was going to progress too far unfortunately as Emmett's health was becoming increasingly debilitating." Later on in the article it states "One thing about which there is no doubt is his influence on the then budding phenomenon that became the Boswell Sisters. All three sisters forever acknowledged the encouragement, advice and help he gave them, particularly with phrasing and harmony. In 1934 Martha erected a memorial stone to him at Pointe a la Hache where Mrs Hardy was then working."

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