An interesting observation by Squirrel Ashcraft.

Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

10:55 PM - Jul 14, 2018 #1

From  http://musicrising.tulane.edu/uploads/t ... 610816.pdf

AshcraftMusicRisingWolverines.jpg I agree. Listen to 

Susie  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfiKYzoQye0

I Need Some Pettin'  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWARRlLfR9Yres


They sound new and fresh, inventive.

Now listen to 

Royal Garden Blues   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zfbx5_QN3Pk

Except for Bix'solo, repetitive and a bit stale. no?.
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Joined: 10:44 AM - Mar 16, 2018

8:27 AM - Jul 16, 2018 #2

Nomsence.
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Joined: 10:44 AM - Mar 16, 2018

8:28 AM - Jul 16, 2018 #3

Sorry. typo.
. Nonsense
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Joined: 4:56 PM - Mar 15, 2018

12:36 AM - Jul 18, 2018 #4

I don't think its fair to generalize about other players in comparison to Bix. Certainly ODJB tunes tended to invoke 'retro' playing, even as early as 1924-6. But the rest of the band, though fully professional by contemporary standards, isn't going to be all that innovative in any material.

The Johnson solos, and Gillette breaks, are pretty thrill-free. The Wolverines without Bix were just another 20s hot(ish) dance band.

The newer tune's arrangements do include some more 'advanced' stuff, which is fun. I still prefer Royal Garden Blues over the others.
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Joined: 10:44 AM - Mar 16, 2018

9:56 AM - Jul 18, 2018 #5

Re. SA's contention that the structure of the  New Orleans tunes. was 'solidified' so everyone would know how they would turn out.  This shows a lack fundamental knowledge of how jazz musicians go about their work. The NO tunes  were standards, mainly learnt - melody line,chord progressions etc -  from previous recordings of the tunes. In the case of a new, more commercial popular tune, such as I Need Some Petting or Susie, sheet music would have been available and the melody line would have been leant from that, also the chord structure.  
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