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TBRC shooting incident

GuyInIndiana
Advanced Member
Joined: October 12th, 2011, 3:11 am

October 26th, 2011, 7:13 pm #1

Here's a reprint from elsewhere online:

http://www.ghosttheory.com/2011/10/26/m ... o-shooting
wrote:
Major Update: TBRC Admits To Shooting

By Scott McMan¡¤October 26, 2011

It would seem that my previous article regarding the BFRO being involved in shooting at a Bigfoot on the Property of retired forest ranger Charles Branson, was in fact the work of the TBRC.

Since I had no conclusive answer as to the validity of the information in the original article, I went on a quest to get the answers. After all, it didn't sit well with me to splash the BFRO name all over the place even if I did make it clear that GT wasn't accusing them.

After doing some research I finally contacted Craig Woolheater (many may know Craig from Crytomundo) who is the actual founder of Texas Bigfoot but resigned last year when they reorganized to form the Texas Bigfoot Research Conservatory.

In my mind Craig has cleared up the entire incident and I have no reason to doubt him. Furthermore, the TBRC admits to the shooting.

Quote Craig Woolheater:


The TBRC has identified themselves as the offending party:

Quote TBRC:


The Echo Incident

Statements made or reported as being made by Honobia, OK, resident Charles Branson at the Honobia Bigfoot Festival on 1 October 2011, concerning incidents that took place the previous July, contain inaccuracies. The basic facts are as follows.

The TBRC was on Mr. Branson's property with his permission as part of Operation Endurance (OE). The group in place at the beginning of July, designated as the ¡°Echo¡± team, was the fifth of ten teams to participate in OE. Subsequent events experienced by that team are referred to as the ¡°Echo Incident¡± within the TBRC.

On 3 July 2011, at approximately 6:15 PM CDT and under clear daylight conditions, Daryl Colyer, Board Member and Field Operations Director of the TBRC, encountered a sasquatch on the Branson property. The observation occurred as he, along with fellow TBRC members Alex Diaz and Travis Lawrence, were investigating a loud banging sound originating from the direction of one of the hunting cabins (referred to by the TBRC as the ¡°West Cabin¡±), not far from where they and one other member of Echo team were based. The sound was consistent with others heard over the duration of OE and suspected of having been made by sasquatches.

Colyer moved down the path toward the West Cabin with Diaz following at fifty or sixty feet. Lawrence was out of their sight as he followed a nearby parallel creek bed. When Colyer rounded a bend in the road and entered a clearing in front of the West Cabin, he witnessed a large, brown, upright, hair-covered figure walking in front of him at a distance of roughly 25-30 yards. Colyer noted it had long hair on its shoulders and the back of its head, which was distinctly conical in shape. He saw it from the left side and slightly to the back; its front was not visible to him at any point. Upon later comparison with a 6'3" tall TBRC member, the creature was estimated to have been both more massive and somewhat taller.

Walking to the south, the creature was momentarily obscured by vegetation and was then visible through an eight to ten foot opening in the dense foliage, still approximately 25-30 yards from Colyer's position. Using his Remington 1100 Tac-4 12 gauge auto-loading shotgun, loaded with 000 buckshot followed by slugs, he attempted to collect the animal for scientific analysis, firing all the rounds in rapid succession. Colyer then approached the spot where the animal had been, reloading as he walked, but found no body. Within a few seconds he heard the faint sound of an automobile engine starting. When Diaz arrived at the location of the encounter, Colyer directed him to investigate the automobile sound. Diaz found a container of iced tea on the ground approximately 50 yards down the path, but he could not determine a source for the engine noise.

All four members of the Echo team attempted to track and locate the animal until it was too dark to see. Although the ground in the area was covered with leaves and other debris, the trail left by the animal was evident until it reached the nearby rocky creek bed. There were clear signs of its travel through the forest, including where it stepped on and crushed a fallen branch that was left unharmed when stepped on by the TBRC investigators. The slugs Colyer fired were all found embedded in trees near where he saw the animal. The team was unable to find any other evidence of the animal or its fate before losing daylight.

The team departed for home the next morning. Shortly after reestablishing cell phone coverage, Mr. Branson contacted the team and informed them that his nephew and his nephew's girlfriend had driven to the site the previous day. The nephew left his truck parked at the property gate and had begun to walk up the path toward the cabins when he heard what he mistook to be machine gun fire. He ran back to his truck and fled the area, apparently damaging his truck in the process. Colyer never saw or heard the truck prior to its departure, nor did he see or hear the two people. Their position, relative to Colyer's, was to the west through the dense forest, while the animal Colyer was attempting to collect was to his southwest. Neither they nor their vehicle was ever in the line of fire.

Following the conversation with Mr. Branson, team members made contact with Branson's son, a deputy sheriff in the area, and related the events to him. He advised contacting the County Sheriff's Office, since the nephew had reported that he had been shot at with a machine gun by ¡°druggies.¡± After communicating with the sheriff's office twice, the matter was dropped. Upon learning of the damage to his truck, said to amount to $1200, the TBRC offered the nephew $2,000 to help offset the cost of repairs. The check was cashed a few days after it was sent. Following a break of approximately one week, the TBRC resumed Operation Endurance to its planned completion.

In December of 2010, TBRC Chairman Alton Higgins clearly stated on the TBRC web site that the organization would ¡°not stand in opposition to individuals¡ªwithin or outside the TBRC¡ªor groups supporting and/or actively pursuing efforts to obtain a specimen.¡± He went on to add, ¡°As a field biologist I have always indicated that I supported collecting a specimen for documentation and study.¡± He went on to explain, ¡°Biologists are trained to think in terms of, and to care about, populations. Collection of a voucher specimen is a way of protecting the population, from my perspective. It is not immoral, even if there are those who disagree for various emotional reasons.¡± Those interested can read the position statement in its entirety here.

The TBRC plans on publishing a more complete account of Operation Endurance at a later date.

Source: http://www.texasbigfoot.com/index.php/n ... 8-news/204

Quote Craig Woolheater:


Here is the official word clarifying their stance of neutrality of no-kill versus pro-kill.

Quote TBRC:


A Word From the Chairman

Few subjects, it seems, produce as much controversy among those with an interest in the sasquatch phenomenon as the documentation question. The TBRC has proceeded for years with the conviction that suitably compelling video and/or photo evidence can suffice to establish the existence of an unknown species of primate in North America. This is the rationale behind the TBRC¡¯s Operation Forest Vigil. However, images alone cannot form the basis for naming or officially classifying a new species. A type specimen is required.

Unfortunately, regarding the question of obtaining a specimen, a spirit of elitism seems to separate those with differing opinions into irreconcilable, mutually dismissive, camps. Although there have probably always been individual members of the TBRC who supported the concept of shooting or capturing a sasquatch, the organization did not ever publicly advance the idea of collecting a type specimen and was generally viewed as supporting a ¡°no-kill¡± position.

In the wake of a recent TBRC internal poll indicating overwhelming approval of the membership regarding the collection of a type specimen, the Board of Directors addressed the documentation issue anew. While stressing that Operation Forest Vigil remains the organization¡¯s priority undertaking, the Board decided, after some months of discussion, to adopt a position of neutrality; that is, while the organization will not have as its stated objective the pursuit of a type specimen, it will not stand in opposition to individuals¡ªwithin or outside the TBRC¡ªor groups supporting and/or actively pursuing efforts to obtain a specimen.

This should not be taken as an indication that the TBRC will sponsor or approve large-scale ¡°hunts¡± in the fashion of some groups. Within the organization, protocols regarding firearms in the field are now stricter than they have ever been: anyone wishing to carry a firearm on a TBRC operation must be well-trained and legally licensed. The safety of TBRC members is a paramount concern.

Speaking now outside of my Chairman role, as a field biologist I have always indicated that I supported collecting a specimen for documentation and study, although I have not personally pursued that objective. I don¡¯t think sasquatches are people. Biologists are trained to think in terms of, and to care about, populations. Collection of a voucher specimen is a way of protecting the population, from my perspective. It is not immoral, even if there are those who disagree for various emotional reasons. Since this would be a new species to science, there is little question but that a specimen is justifiable. Here¡¯s a link to guidelines and policies that have been worked out in the scientific community regarding the collection of voucher specimens.

Hopefully this note provides some clarity regarding the perspective attained by the TBRC Board of Directors; it does not represent a modification of the organization¡¯s mission statement: ¡°To investigate and conduct research regarding the existence of the unlisted primate species known as the sasquatch or bigfoot; to facilitate scientific, official and governmental recognition, conservation, and protection of the species and its habitat; and to help further factual education and understanding to the public regarding the species, with a focus mainly in, but not necessarily limited to, the states of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.¡±

Alton Higgins
Chairman, TBRC

There's a whole lot more there at the initial link provided that goes into the history at the research site in question. This is the same TBRC that attempted to drag many of the members and ADMINS of this forum thru the mud by attempting to expose a research/investigation site back in 2009 when we released The Michigan Recording Project.

I'll personally have more to say about that and the TBRC in the near future when the TBRC releases some audio that was recently acknowledged to have been recorded at one of their research sites of unknown origin, but is eerily similar to some of the audio the MRP recorded and released and that of the Sierra Sounds. This revelation was recently made on "The Bigfoot Show", a pod-cast that can be found on iTunes.

-Mike B.
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Stacy
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Joined: October 11th, 2011, 10:49 pm

October 26th, 2011, 8:53 pm #2

wrote:...a spirit of elitism seems to separate those with differing opinions into irreconcilable, mutually dismissive, camps...
And who would know better about that spirit? How apropos.

I can't believe Colyer didn't use the 50-round Glock! ;)
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GuyInIndiana
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Joined: October 12th, 2011, 3:11 am

October 26th, 2011, 10:50 pm #3

Stacy wrote:
wrote:...a spirit of elitism seems to separate those with differing opinions into irreconcilable, mutually dismissive, camps...
And who would know better about that spirit? How apropos.

I can't believe Colyer didn't use the 50-round Glock! ;)
A spirit of elitism. Right. And talk about his displaying of it with a statement like this:
wrote: I don't think sasquatches are people. Biologists are trained to think in terms of, and to care about, populations. Collection of a voucher specimen is a way of protecting the population, from my perspective. It is not immoral, even if there are those who disagree for various emotional reasons.
"Emotional reasons"... how dismissive. Try intellectual ones. Elitist and dismissive. Nothing different from Alton than 2 years ago.



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Susan
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Joined: October 12th, 2011, 4:35 pm

October 27th, 2011, 3:01 pm #4

Oh My............. blink
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Timberghost
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Joined: October 13th, 2011, 2:06 am

October 27th, 2011, 10:28 pm #5

And to think I caught grief from some of those exact same folks, who later did the exact same thing in the exact same area... ^o)
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Stacy
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Joined: October 11th, 2011, 10:49 pm

October 28th, 2011, 2:43 am #6

Yeah, well..."those" folks that ripped our recordings up and down after outing the location and publishing Higgins' little article have now come forth with a recording that sounds like -- wait for it -- can ya guess?? Yeah, you can guess.

Can you say "hypocritical assholes"?? Sure. I knew ya could. :)
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Susan
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Joined: October 12th, 2011, 4:35 pm

October 28th, 2011, 3:29 am #7

You bet I can say it......


Hypocritical Assholes!!!!
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Paulw
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Joined: October 12th, 2011, 2:27 am

October 28th, 2011, 3:39 am #8

And from the description...it came from a farm, with roads, and neighbors. Huh....go figure.
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Just Curious
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Joined: October 14th, 2011, 4:48 am

October 28th, 2011, 5:28 am #9

I just don't even know where to start on this one! There is the hypocrisy of what happened historically regarding the MRP and the ensuing article authored by the person who seems to think his pen is mighty. But what bothers me most about this - and it isn't even the kill/no-kill debate - it's the unethical hunting standard. 1) when you hunt, you shoot to kill. What does all this guns going off like machine gun fire say about that!? It certainly doesn't seem that Colyer had a clear kill shot opportunity given the description. 2) if you wound, but don't kill your prey, you track it to finish the job. And "we ran out of daylight" is not enough. They should have gone back at daybreak to continue the job and used tracking dogs if necessary. I am using a broad brush and painting the whole group and it ain't "pretty pink". And all the smoke about specimens vs. populations is just that. It is morally and ethically wrong, just plain and simple, wrong, to kill any living creature simply for the sake of science.
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keilder
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Joined: October 16th, 2011, 4:35 am

October 28th, 2011, 6:15 am #10

It could be worse I suppose.............





Yep, it could be raining....oh hold on


it is!!!! :biggrin
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