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If Bigfoot were in an area

Just Curious
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Joined: October 14th, 2011, 4:48 am

December 7th, 2014, 11:21 am #1

Let's say you don't know if bigfoot is in a particular area or not (ha), but it is in fact there. If you were to set up shop so to speak, meaning either daily monitoring, or camping for a weekend or a week, how long do you think it would take before 'something' happens?

That something could be vocalizations, ye old tree knocking, capturing a blobsquatch image, questionable trail cam activity, thermal image, whatever might lead you to think there really is something out there.

I'm coming at this from the perspective that there aren't a lot of reports from this state, but I'm pretty sure there is habitat. So, if I pick a particular habitat to check out, how long do I stick around there before moving on?

Also, has there been any luck with trail cams that anyone is aware of? (Don't need details, just a yes/no)
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Stacy
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Joined: October 11th, 2011, 10:49 pm

December 7th, 2014, 1:27 pm #2

Hard telling...our area has farm living on one side and miles and miles of forest on the other, so ours are used to seeing people, used to us being back in there, etc. But it seems like if you've got some in an area and you went and set up shop, made some noise, had campfires, and made your presence known, they'd be checking you out almost immediately. Whether or not you'd know it would be the question. :D You'd want to listen closely for knocks, light taps, thumping on the ground, grunting.

Trail cams? Let's say probably lol... we still use them, set them out where nobody else knows where they are, leave them for week and months (and sometimes years) in the same spot, and we'll have activity in those areas and they STILL won't get anything. I had a brand new one out for a week last year that didn't even work right when WE went past it! I still don't for a moment believe they can "see" where they are in the dark but damned if I know how they're so good at avoiding them.
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keilder
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Joined: October 16th, 2011, 4:35 am

December 8th, 2014, 10:53 pm #3

could it be their fur is so dense the don't give off heat which trail cams work on?

i.e they are passive IR?

If they are man will they make great burglars.
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Just Curious
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Joined: October 14th, 2011, 4:48 am

December 11th, 2014, 5:33 am #4

Reading your reply, Stacy, brings a thought to mind. I wonder if like other domestic animals that the bigfoot associate the smell of particular humans. That could explain why when people claim multiple sightings but when someone else shows up, nothing seems to happen. Hmm...
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Stacy
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Joined: October 11th, 2011, 10:49 pm

December 11th, 2014, 1:36 pm #5

Keilder, the fur thing is a possibility, especially in the summer.

Shelly I'm sure that after all these years, they've got to recognize us and even our vehicles. And our landowner for sure...the area where most of our activity has come from the last 3 years is where the road into camp runs through, and very often they'll let loose as he's going through there or within a minute or two after.
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Bukwas
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Joined: November 20th, 2012, 7:01 am

December 20th, 2014, 4:46 am #6

I don't think gamecams work, or work well enough.
FLIRS are great, expensive toys but not reliable enough.
Good 'ole sitting in the woods (we're talking weeks) with a good recorder and video camera seem to be the most reliable way to get the closest to what you want. Proof.
Don't forget the casting materials and lots of plastic baggies too.
High Tek looks like a bust so far.
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keilder
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Joined: October 16th, 2011, 4:35 am

December 20th, 2014, 8:46 pm #7

I agree with you but if you consider the USA alone not even Canada is 3.80 million square miles and if we accept some people who say the population could be from 3000 - 5000

Thats one bigfoot per 760 square miles. But theres more sightings in one area than others, yadda yadda yadda.....

I think games cams may work, but you will need a trillion pound plus budget to cover all off the US.

Even if you were a multi millionaire you still couldn't do it as the area is too vast. Boots on the ground as Buck says to me anyway is the only way but not one set, I mean about 100 groups of about 4 people for 6 months in a line and pushing forward and that still has so many holes it's not effective.

You need trillions plane and simple, and nobdoy will spend that without a return of 10%-30%.


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Just Curious
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Joined: October 14th, 2011, 4:48 am

December 21st, 2014, 10:43 am #8

One day, I went digging for information on how various new species were discovered to see just how exactly it happens in most cases. What I came across in doing that was a wealth of information on species identification and monitoring by biologists and conservationists. Simply because of the magnitude of identifying the worlds species and locations, it is a place where citizen involvement is welcomed.

More importantly, I started thinking about the fact that if people really want bigfoot/sasquatch/yeti/yowie/etc/etc/etc recognized as a species, reporting sightings to organizations like B F R O and so on is NOT the way to go. Here is just a short list of organizations whose websites I've been reading through:

EOL (Encyclopedia of Life)
Lifewatch.eu
EBI Elixir
GBIF
CBOL
IUCN
iNaturalist

and related sites. It is possible to organize a 'bioblitz' wherein groups go through a specified area and do inventory of the plants, animals and birds of that area. There are instructions for game camera trap protocols (a pretty good one at http://www.conservationnw.org/ ) and field guides for identification purposes.

There are other 'blitzs' to specifically look for a particular species within a specified area. Mostly geared toward invasive species or protected species, but a study was called to study several species crossing I90 as a precursor to an expansion project so that alternate travel routes could be built into the project, for example. (I would dearly love to interview any and all of the people involved in that project considering where it was done to see what they actually did find)

In some cases, there are actually government and research funds available to assist with the projects. There is the caveat that iNaturalist only allows previously identified species studies, but even at that, you can get a special blessing to set up monitoring for unidentified species.

I can't find the document now, but I read something about guidelines for setting up camera traps based on ???? protocols and it specified somewhere around 20 cameras set up in a grid pattern but I don't recall the area, if that was per square mile or a larger target area.

Bottom line, I have to believe following these types of guidelines for research and reporting would be much more scientific than what's currently being used. There could be other benefits and applications too, but this post is long enough.
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