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Bigfoot Infrasound?

GuyInIndiana
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Joined: October 12th, 2011, 3:11 am

November 20th, 2012, 11:58 pm #1

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Stacy
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Joined: October 11th, 2011, 10:49 pm

November 21st, 2012, 3:15 am #2

Interesting! I still think infrasound is a possibility with the big guys, especially given some of the really low stuff we've recorded. Wonder what's out there that could record infrasound, even though we couldn't hear it, but that could maybe show it on a spectrogram?
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keilder
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Joined: October 16th, 2011, 4:35 am

November 21st, 2012, 9:13 am #3

There was a company (Swedish or German) when I was looking into my own weird experience and trying to solve that. Sventak or Svantek, but there specialized engineering monitors classed as Vibrometres. That yes, recorded the wave signature not the sound.

Damned expensive if I recollect.

My only problem with this, as we have no base-line to go on! How can you successfully say that this wave you recorded was an accurate recording of a BF when it could be normal background infrasound, water pumps etc.,

I suppose if you could find a mic that picked up to 1Hz to 20Hz, then that could be adapted to a laptop then a program wrote to capture the signal/wave. Actually you might be able to adapt a really large speaker and use the speaker, as it has enough surface area to vibrate and send the pulses back.( i.e reverse the speaker and use it as a capture device) Just thinking out loud.
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Doberman
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Joined: October 7th, 2013, 6:40 pm

December 1st, 2013, 5:12 pm #4

Infrasound is characterized by an ability to cover long distances and get around obstacles with little dissipation. It is lower in frequency than 20 Hz, below the normal limit of human hearing. Whales, Elephants, Hippopotamuses, Rhinoceros, Giraffes, Okapi, & Alligators are known to use infrasound to communicate over long distances. Elephants, in particular, produce infrasound waves that travel through solid ground and are sensed by other herds using their feet, although they may be separated by hundreds of miles. One study has suggested that infrasound may cause feelings of awe or fear in humans. Look at the advantages for a Sasquatch, why couldn't it have been evolved like other animals did, but as a tool to communicate through distances of heavily forest terrain without humans hearing it, and also as a first line defense mechanism when humans get too close. Could explain a lot?
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Doberman
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Joined: October 7th, 2013, 6:40 pm

December 1st, 2013, 8:06 pm #5

http://www.infiltec.com/Infrasound@home

Contacted this company via email. They said they could record Infrasound from wildlife with their recorders. I've included the contact email address to the company if anyone is curious.

DSaum@infiltec.com
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keilder
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Joined: October 16th, 2011, 4:35 am

December 2nd, 2013, 12:09 am #6

You still need a base line or it's all speculation, and if you have a base line game over. catch 22.

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Stacy
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Joined: October 11th, 2011, 10:49 pm

December 2nd, 2013, 6:05 am #7

I've always thought it was a possibility, but after one particular episode with my adult son that had us packing up and leaving camp at 1:30 in the morning with him completely freaked out, I think it's really, REALLY a possibility, if not a probability.
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Just Curious
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Joined: October 14th, 2011, 4:48 am

December 8th, 2013, 8:29 am #8

I know infrasound is supposed to have this affect (fear, etc.), but if true, wouldn't you think people visiting a zoo would be affected by it? I don't think people are, but I don't know how to interpret that. Do animals not use it in captivity? Do they use it, but not while people are visiting? Are people affected, but just don't react when they're around a lot of people?

keilder, I understand what you're saying about sorting out all the various infrasound sources, but I think when it's 'interpreted' via computer software to be audible, you'd hear a 'voice' distinct from other sources. I know this same issue existed when they first discovered that giraffe's do in fact make sounds. At first they thought it was something in the environment. (Random knowledge accumulated from an assignment my daughter did on the giraffe)

I read the same thing you posted Doberman (and I know it's the same source because I wondered what the heck an okapi was, lol). I found a place that had the whole setup for under $2000. It's on my wish list for when I win the lottery. It was while considering the whole idea of bigfoot using infrasound that I had the random thought of using the infrasonic rodent repellent thingy. Swirling around in my little head is this half-baked idea of 'forget call blasting' use infrasound. I don't mean the rodent thingy would speak their language, just that it might send a signal unusual to them and make them curious enough to check it out.



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keilder
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Joined: October 16th, 2011, 4:35 am

December 9th, 2013, 5:10 am #9

I never considered that before JC, I would assume and it purely is a guess that when people do become nauseous, unnerved sometimes at Zoo’s that may actually be the culprit. Well thought out, well thought out indeed.

The software would be easy, but I see a serious problem and damn it’s going to be expensive to do. As you will need to take as many sources of natural infrasound known, same for animals then cross reference.

i.e

Is this known in nature or natural?

No

Can an animal make it?

Yes

Is this animal known to exist here?

No (red flag for further study)

But gathering all that data will be outside of everybody’s budget, even Hersoms as it would be time consuming and take years. Then what if you have as an example a Bear is discovered to make a sound of 5.1 Hz, then 5.1 Hz can also be created by many things in nature and manmade, and for the sake of argument BF can emit 5.1 Hz

I like your rodent idea, as it’s kind of using chaos against chaos and distance! A randomly emitting frequency from x to y on a scale…But again if you go into the 5-6 Hz that’s a pretty dangerous area to be playing with and maybe that’s the range you do need.

There’s Vic Tandy (deceased now) but he discovered that around 19 Hz unsettled people and I can’t recall the frequency, another also vibrated the eye ball and made you see things out the corner of your eye, combined with uneasiness he applied it to Ghost research.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vic_Tandy

It’s a fascinating field and subject, but expensive and possibly dangerous…
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Just Curious
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Joined: October 14th, 2011, 4:48 am

December 11th, 2013, 5:27 am #10

I think quite a bit of the work on recording some animals has already been done keilder. Check out this whole website and see the work they've done/are doing: Fauna Communications

That's just one place working on bioacoustic research. I'm sure there are others. Of course, in each of these cases, they were able to stick a microphone near the subject while observing behavior to correlate an action with the vocalization. Note specifically the neck throw associated with giraffe vocalizations.

That's the real problem with trying to do this 'blindly', i.e., just sticking a mic 'out there.' It would have to be a situation where someone actually hearing what they think are bigfoot vocalizations at the audible level then simultaneously recording at the infrasonic level. Assuming some inaudible sounds are recorded, it would then be a matter of waiting for another encounter, and another and receiving the same inaudible recordings. Then scientifically speaking, you'd have a recording that could be compared to recordings at other sites, just like with the audible recordings floating around.

Not as neat and tidy as recording out of a cage, but we have to work with what we're given...
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