At least Priceline errs both ways

Moderators: KeenWink, tilepusher, readymade

At least Priceline errs both ways

readymade
Registered User
Joined: 25 Jul 2000, 13:00

27 Oct 2007, 01:38 #1

gemstate
Registered User
(9/20/07 12:16 am)
Reply | Edit | Del All

&nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp New Post At Least Priceline Errs Both Ways As a very frequent Priceline bidder, I want to note that on occasion a hotel turns out to be better than the star rating would make you think. An example is a hotel I often get in Boise, rated 2.5* because the sink is in the hotel room not the inner bathroom, and the hotel has no restaurant. But the rooms have mini fridges, microwaves, luxury beds and bedding, plus a 1/2 room divider with a mini living room on the other side complete with a hide-a-bed couch for kiddies (and linens for it). There's a special public room for an excellent free breakfast (serve yourself) free Internet, free local calls, nice exercise room, seasonal pool and spa. Better than most 3* places I know. So you get good surprises sometimes!

verkuilb
Registered User
(9/20/07 10:38 am)
Reply | Edit | Del

&nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp New Post Re: At Least Priceline Errs Both Ways I agree with you completely--although I don't know if I'd classify this as Priceling 'err'ing in their hotel rating, so much as them having rating criteria which are incongruent with what many travelers are looking for, particularly those travelers who are traveling for pleasure, with families, rather than for business. For example, to get 3*, the hotel has to have an attached restaurant--many times, that seems to be the only difference between 2.5* and 3*. But for a family who isn't getting their meals reimbursed by their employer, hotels with free breakfast are far superior to those with restaurants--and in my experience, free breakfasts are far more common at 2.5* hotels than 3*. Also, 2.5* are far more likely to be in locations where free parking is available on-site or nearby. These are some of the reasons many people prefer to bid 2.5* rather than 3*, and also part of the reason why many poeple wish that there was a way to prevent Priceline from 'upgrading' 2.5* bidders to a 3* hotel.

Virageadroit
Registered User
(9/20/07 3:51 pm)
Reply | Edit | Del

&nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp New Post Re: At Least Priceline Errs Both Ways The star ratings require both the amenities and the quality. The 2.5* ratings are usually for fine places that don't have the facilities that are listed for 3* places. This provides for good deals if you want them as you have found. The system is pretty predictable and the "value" of the stars is only in how you decide you want to use them. The 4* hotels in my area are no better than the 3* models for most purposes.

Edited by: Virageadroit at: 9/28/07 6:40 am
LAX Traveler
Registered User
(9/26/07 11:38 pm)
Reply | Edit | Del

&nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp New Post Re: At Least Priceline Errs Both Ways <quote>The 2.5* ratings are usually for fine places that don't have the facilities that are listed.

Can you please clarify what you mean by this? Sorry, I never have any problem understanding your other postings, but this has me confused.

At some point in the past I recall reading a list that gave the criteria for the PL star quality (e.g. the above poster who mentions the sink not in the bathroom.) Does this topic still exist to anyone's knowledge, or where does this exist?

Thanks,
LAX

Virageadroit
Registered User
(9/28/07 6:48 am)
Reply | Edit | Del

&nbsp &nbsp &nbsp &nbsp New Post Re: At Least Priceline Errs Both Ways I meant that the 2.5* places don't have the facilities that are listed for places with more stars. I edited it to say that specifically. Priceline's web site has the information about its star rating system at the level of information that they make public. Go to the "name your own price section" and click on help. Chooose the topic "how do I know which star level..." I've copied the section on 3* and 2.5*
2.5* Moderate Plus
"Priceline's 2 1/2 star hotels are national name brand and quality independent hotels featuring tasteful accommodations, casual and welcoming public spaces and well-appointed rooms. While hotel services may be somewhat limited, they will feature a restaurant for breakfast or offer a continental buffet. Moderate-Plus hotels sometimes offer amenities for the business traveler and may have a residential feel."
3* Upscate
" Along with all of the amenities of a Moderate-Plus hotel, 3 star hotels offer a higher level of guest service. In addition, most hotels will offer a restaurant serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, and in-room dining. A fitness center may also be available"

Edited by: Virageadroit at: 9/28/07 6:49 am
Reply

Travelwonk
Registered User
Joined: 15 Aug 2007, 04:08

27 Oct 2007, 22:51 #2

The standards in big cities are not the same as in small towns. Priceline rates the Paramount in NYC as 3*, but in any other part of the country it would be 1* at best.
Reply