The turntable in your head

BaseballGamesBKW
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September 6th, 2015, 4:35 pm #1

The turntable in your head -- what do you have playing on it?

We'll inaugurate the Open & Off-Topic forum with this thread. Start a new thread
on another subject entirely unrelated to baseball boardgames, or reply on topic to this one.
Make your own rules for your own thread, subject of course to the "no politics - no religion -
no bickering" rule that covers the entire forum.

For this thread, just post a link to a tune you like so we can all enjoy it. Only an exhibition,
not a competition, so please, no wagering. Any genre is fine -- rock, pop, blues, classical,
anything -- but as a general guideline, post something not currently in heavy rotation,
something we haven't all heard a thousand times, something we're not inevitably going to hear
in any given hour on the radio, no matter how much most of us might enjoy "Free Bird" or
"Stairway to Heaven" or "Someone Like You" or "Toccata & Fugue in D Minor." An obscure
B-side, or something that maybe was a decent-size hit some years ago but has been all but
forgotten now, or something from a rarely-heard genre... whatever.

We'll start with this, only because, for one thing, it is kind of related to the general topic
of the entire forum (and immediately upon having done so, we place an injunction against
any other baseball songs
in this thread), but mainly because Wynona Carr is, to us, one
of the greatest vocalists of all time, and a tragic and sadly forgotten story on top of it.
We submit we're not violating the "no religion" rule right out of the box (nobody in the
front office is anything close to what anybody would call "religious") -- it's here just for
the vocals and the arrangement and maybe to make somebody aware of Wynona Carr,
a great blues and jazz vocalist as well as a gospel singer. This version, unfortunately,
does delete the ballpark-organ intro of the original recording (available in other versions
on YouTube), but it has a nice array of baseball photos which the other videos don't have.
(Sorry, too, about the opening advert, but there's hardly a vid on YouTube that doesn't
have one.)
You may in fact have already heard this, since it was played over the end credits for "42,"
the recent Jackie Robinson biopic, but we've been Wynona fans here for like twenty years.

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KERmudjn9
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KERmudjn9
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September 6th, 2015, 11:58 pm #2

Just so's that convoluted explanation of how this particular thread works isn't misinterpreted,
Grampa Grumpy goes rogue here with a great tune that's been running through my head
ever since I heard it on the radio a couple of weeks ago for the first time in about 25 years...
more excellent lyrics, more excellent female vocals (that's the lovely Johnette Napolitano)...

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cavalcadeofsports
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September 8th, 2015, 12:35 pm #3

My front-office cohorts imply that Mister Fun is obligated to add at least one thing here.
Okey-doke... a local actress passed away last week, she the daughter of the famous
songwriter responsible for, among many other standards, the tune below, here performed
by arguably the greatest and most influential musician in American history. Can't get it
out of my head now. Zah zah zah.
Cheers --
Win

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Butch7999
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September 11th, 2015, 11:00 pm #4

And completing the front-office crew's initial choices...
A guilty pleasure, maybe, but I think this is such a great tune it should be the national anthem.
Of what, I'm not sure, but the national anthem of something.
Never mind the spectacularly embarrassing video, which seems to involve war refugees from Middle Earth
being escorted through a dimensional portal by jump-suited time-travellers from a very kinky discotheque.
Just listen, don't watch. It's just a fantastically great song.
Also, not to be confused with the very different Bob Dylan song of the same name.
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stone193
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September 14th, 2015, 4:00 pm #5

A number I once got in my head and couldn't get it out till I learned to play it note for note was Jenny, Jenny.

Here's a pic of me back in 1990 - just about the best band I ever played in back then. I was close with
everyone in the group - I still miss them to this day.

I have had the privilege to take lessons on the drums and guitar - can't sing a lick so I'll never be in demand
when a band needs another guitarist.

Oh well - I have had my share of fun.

Some day, I'll tell my story of backing up the Duprees back in 1962!

Here I am or not?



The world series was on at the time of us playing.
Mike
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1961Yankees
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September 20th, 2015, 5:02 pm #6

A big fan of 1960s music here ... that's basically what I play all day on my iPod at work.
Although my familiarity with the Zombies was confined to just their three big hits
(Tell Her No, She's Not There, and Time of the Season), I was always suspicious that
they were an under-appreciated group.

I recently acquired their greatest hits CD and after non-stop listening, I believe I am right.
One song in particular, Leave Me Be, is as good as anything they've ever done ...
even on the weekends I can still hear this haunting melody running through my head.

Let me know what you think.
Dave

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8y6lTDJLrcY

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stone193
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February 4th, 2018, 5:11 pm #7

Wish I had taken the time to respond to the request to revisit the Zombies.
Saw them reprise their songs on cable a few years ago - definitely had lost a bit in terms of octaves from those days but still a treat to watch.
"She's not there" will  always be a keeper for me.

When the Brits "invaded" - was a knee-jerk reaction by me and my bandmates to keep playing the "American" songs - after all who could beat the "silky smooth" play of the Ventures?
However, since ya can't lick'm?  Join'm!

Everything Beatles was our calling card for some time.  Back then, I was playing drums - so the bourgeoning heavy metal sound of the Kinks e.g. - ignited me. 

Keith Moon?  My idle.
Ginger Baker?  Another love of my life.
Jim McCarty?  Pure energy (less known perhaps with the Yardbirds - still plays today at 74!)

So, I took my autographed drum sticks from Joe Morello (Dave Brubeck) that I acquired at the Metropol (which by the way turned into a go-go joint around 1966 - no more progressive jazz or anything civilized!) and got heavier - more aggressive sticks.  After all, Wipeout was hardly "Take Five" or "Blue Rondo a la Turk."  To add, for those who were fans of jazz - the time signature for the former is 5/4 and the latter 9/8!  Progressive?  I sure thought so!

Those were ground breaking IMO when most music was either 4/4, 2/4 or 3/4.

In closing.

Where's the turntable?

I heard The Clash - Rock the Casbah and can't get it out of my head.  I remember when we thought they were singing "Rob the cashbox" LOL.

And as Casey used to say:  "Keep your feet on the ground and keep reaching for the stars."   
Mike
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BaseballGamesBKW
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February 8th, 2018, 6:39 pm #8

Hi again, Mike, thanks for the comments and reminiscences!  

All great drummers you named there -- we've gotta add to that list 
Gene Krupa, arguably the first rock n' roll drummer from before 
there even was rock n' roll.  That guy deserves a "biopic," and 
maybe he's too old now, but Hank Azaria woulda been excellent 
as Krupa, doncha think?  

"Rock the Casbah" -- heh, for years we thought one line was "Sharia 
don't like it"...  c'mon, that almost kinda made sense, eh?   Shoot, 
we should do a separate thread in here just for "misheard lyrics" -- 
in that vein, and since you mention Ginger Baker, here's a front-office 
favourite by Cream, some of the lyrics of which resonate deeply with 
some of us, while other parts not so much, including the bit we all 
originally heard as "Then I told you 'bout our kid: now he's not a 
tomato"...  

  
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stone193
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February 9th, 2018, 11:01 am #9



OK.
Time for another story.

It's 196-something and I'm playing in a high school group called the Rondells. 
We're playing in a beach club at Atlantic Beach, LI and Bobby Lewis of "Tossin & Turnin" fame will be the headliner - we're the opener/houseband for the nite.

Well.  Bobby is a no show and in his place was the Duprees - "You Belong to Me."
Wish I had pics.  

They show up with 1 guitar and a bass player - no drummer.  The guy who plays the guitar said:  "hey kid - ya wanna back us up?"  I said:  "sure!"
So, he says:  "watch me for the cuts and don't drag"  Back then songs were simple and they "telegraphed" the cuts by their simplicity.  So that's my only contact with "real" players! 
Mike
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BaseballGamesBKW
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February 14th, 2018, 4:05 pm #10

Cool!  The closest "brush with fame" we can report here was the time 
one of us had a Courtney Cox - Bruce Springsteen moment, pulled up 
on stage by the lead "singer" of the punk band Green Jello to shout 
and dance with the band.  So was almost everyone else in the mosh pit, 
though, so it's not like that made him special.  
It was sorta like this, but several years earlier, with about a third of 
that crowd and without the puppets and props:  
  
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stone193
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February 14th, 2018, 5:20 pm #11

The closest "brush with fame" we can report
Definitely qualifies guys!

Now for the next story.

It's 1970-something.  I met a girl thru a friend named Diane who's "day job" is waiting on tables but is in a group called Desmond Child and Rouge.

Desmond Child is an amazingly prolific writer - he co-wrote La Vida Boca with Ricky Martin e.g., wrote and co-wrote songs for Bon Jovi like "You give love a bad name"; Aerosmith etc.

He failed as an act with Rouge - I have their only album that was given to me by Diane.



Diane is the middle female.

Now to my story.

Diane gets me tickets to a small gig that the group is doing in a place called Tracks or Trax?  Near Columbus Circle in Manhattan.

It's a "downstairs" venue - which was very small and seating was tight - and being a bit claustrophobic - I was very uncomfortable.

I went up to Diane who introduced me to Desmond (not what I would call affable) and she told me to look behind - Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley were there!  Honest?  Couldn't have picked them out in a lineup in 1970 something without their iconic makeup.

And most impressively - sitting and waiting?  Paul McCartney and John Lennon!  She said they were "big on" seeing new groups.

What a night!  Even if I spend half the time looking for the "exits."  

Postscript:

Fast forward to 1980-something and I'm watching Showtime and I see Gilda's live performance on Broadway.  And who do I see?

Diane and Rouge!  Diane's on the left.



Ya gotta love NYC!
Mike
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BaseballGamesBKW
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March 18th, 2018, 4:00 pm #12

Cool story, Mike!  The "cut-out" hole on the LP you pictured is certainly 
appropriate -- back in the '70s and '80s, we were all inveterate haunters 
of the vast cut-out bins at the huge and wonderful (and only just recently 
shuttered) record store in Buffalo.  Major (and frequently played) chunks 
of our record collections were acquired in those cheapie bins -- loads of 
excellent, obscure, underappreciated music to be had there for a buck or 
three an album.  Although we never picked it up, the LP you pictured was 
one that was always there in the bins, and that's one of only two reasons 
we knew of them at all (their stuff never got any airplay on any of the area 
radio stations we listened to) -- the other reason being that we knew their 
name from the soundtrack of The Warriors, that pecuilar, cheezy, cult-fave 
1979 movie that happened to feature a friend of ours as an extra.  

Don't want to denigrate ol' Desmond without having met the guy, but he 
sure looks a little different nowadays than he did on that album jacket, 
and if sometimes you can judge a book by its cover, the current douchey 
LA-record-producer look seems to corroborate your less-than-favorably-
impressed experience:  
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=de ... ORM=HDRSC2 
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KERmudjn9
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March 18th, 2018, 6:58 pm #13

Suffering the other day from an "earworm," as PeeWee dubbed them 
-- a song, often one you even dislike, that gets stuck in your head -- 
after the latest and particularly grisly, creepy episode of The X Files 
repeatedly featured snippets of "the haunting love theme" from 1972's 
The Poseidon Adventure, "The Morning After."  Urrgg.  

I've found a good way to get rid of an earworm is not by listening to 
something completely different but instead by listening to something 
that's almost sorta kinda similar, except way way better.  So here's 
one that we're all always happy to hear around here, one of 
Barenaked Ladies' most underappreciated and least-played "hits," 
which also happens to include one of the smartest, most resonant 
lyrics (line 6) ever set to music:  
 
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stone193
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March 18th, 2018, 8:37 pm #14

You got me on this one Kerm.
Have never heard it before.

Don't know why but it reminded me of John Updike's Rabbit Run - when he left his wife and wound up living with Ruth - a hooker of sorts.

"cowards stay while traitors run" - tho IMO, Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom was both a coward and a traitor.
Mike
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BaseballGamesBKW
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March 27th, 2018, 6:43 pm #15

Hi Mike -- BNL eventually earned their fame in the US and internationally, 
but we were fans for years before that because of our close proximity to 
Canadian airplay.  Still, some of their best stuff -- "Jane," "The Old Apartment," 
and others -- isn't as well known to American audiences.  

You got something very, very different from those lyrics than we did.  What 
resonated with all of us here was the impossible (too familar to us) dilemma 
"Jane" imposes on her boyfriend.  Sure, maybe some people can be both, 
but the point is, according to Jane, nobody can be neither.  And hey, that 
ain't fair at all.  

If Barenaked Ladies are a bit obscure to this audience, here's a band -- 
a fantastic band, one loved by all of us here in the front office despite our 
occasionally disparate tastes -- that we'll bet no one on board has ever 
even heard of.  We saw them on The Midnight Special sometime around 
1980, thought they were delightfully cool and intriguing, and several years 
later, found their debut LP in the cheapie bin at that same cavernous record 
store we mentioned earlier.  Unbelievably great, to our ears, and we'll have 
more of them later in this thread or the other music thread, although you can 
find almost all of their stuff with a simple search on YouTube anyway.  These 
are the Catholic Girls (not to be confused with the Denver punks Catholic 
School Girls).  They've been playing and infrequently issuing a few great albums 
for almost forty years now, although the only two band members who've been 
part of it the whole time are the founders, songwriter / lead singer Gail Peterson 
(also an author of several gothic novels) and brilliant guitarist Roxy Anderson.  

We were gonna introduce them here with another one of their pop/rock numbers, 
but as much as we insist on staying apolitical on this forum (and require everyone 
else to do likewise), this is just a gorgeous song -- originally written to eulogize 
Columbine, and more apt than ever after how many similar tragedies since then  
(further shameful that everyone's lost count) right up to Great Mills and Parkland.  
From their 2002 album of the same name, "Make Me Believe":  
 


 
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stone193
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March 27th, 2018, 8:35 pm #16

You got something very, very different from those lyrics than we did.  What 
resonated with all of us here was the impossible (too familar to us) dilemma 
"Jane" imposes on her boyfriend.  Sure, maybe some people can be both, 
but the point is, according to Jane, nobody can be neither.  And hey, that 
ain't fair at all.  
Hi guys
I wasn't really drawing an exact parallel to the 2 things to be honest - since I'm rereading the novel - it just got me to thinking.

Actually with respect to Jane - I thought - well...you're damned if you do and damned if ya don't?

Thanx for the great music and a chance to relate to something outside of my personal collectibles.  
Mike
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