The turntable in your head

General banter unrelated to baseball boardgames. Resolutely a cordial and convivial board, so talk here about hockey, football, antiques, non-sports boardgames, your vacation, your new housepet, your favorite music or your favorite movie, anything, whatever -- but absolutely, positively, no religion and no politics. Keep it light. Absolutely no arguing or insults.

The turntable in your head

BaseballGamesBKW
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Joined: 25 Oct 2013, 10:10

06 Sep 2015, 20:35 #1

The turntable in your head -- what do you have playing on it?

We'll inaugurate the Open & Off-Topic forum with this thread. Start a new thread
on another subject entirely unrelated to baseball boardgames, or reply on topic to this one.
Make your own rules for your own thread, subject of course to the "no politics - no religion -
no bickering" rule that covers the entire forum.

For this thread, just post a link to a tune you like so we can all enjoy it. Only an exhibition,
not a competition, so please, no wagering. Any genre is fine -- rock, pop, blues, classical,
anything -- but as a general guideline, post something not currently in heavy rotation,
something we haven't all heard a thousand times, something we're not inevitably going to hear
in any given hour on the radio, no matter how much most of us might enjoy "Free Bird" or
"Stairway to Heaven" or "Someone Like You" or "Toccata & Fugue in D Minor." An obscure
B-side, or something that maybe was a decent-size hit some years ago but has been all but
forgotten now, or something from a rarely-heard genre... whatever.

We'll start with this, only because, for one thing, it is kind of related to the general topic
of the entire forum (and immediately upon having done so, we place an injunction against
any other baseball songs
in this thread), but mainly because Wynona Carr is, to us, one
of the greatest vocalists of all time, and a tragic and sadly forgotten story on top of it.
We submit we're not violating the "no religion" rule right out of the box (nobody in the
front office is anything close to what anybody would call "religious") -- it's here just for
the vocals and the arrangement and maybe to make somebody aware of Wynona Carr,
a great blues and jazz vocalist as well as a gospel singer. This version, unfortunately,
does delete the ballpark-organ intro of the original recording (available in other versions
on YouTube), but it has a nice array of baseball photos which the other videos don't have.
(Sorry, too, about the opening advert, but there's hardly a vid on YouTube that doesn't
have one.)
You may in fact have already heard this, since it was played over the end credits for "42,"
the recent Jackie Robinson biopic, but we've been Wynona fans here for like twenty years.

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KERmudjn9
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KERmudjn9
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07 Sep 2015, 03:58 #2

Just so's that convoluted explanation of how this particular thread works isn't misinterpreted,
Grampa Grumpy goes rogue here with a great tune that's been running through my head
ever since I heard it on the radio a couple of weeks ago for the first time in about 25 years...
more excellent lyrics, more excellent female vocals (that's the lovely Johnette Napolitano)...

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cavalcadeofsports
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cavalcadeofsports
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08 Sep 2015, 16:35 #3

My front-office cohorts imply that Mister Fun is obligated to add at least one thing here.
Okey-doke... a local actress passed away last week, she the daughter of the famous
songwriter responsible for, among many other standards, the tune below, here performed
by arguably the greatest and most influential musician in American history. Can't get it
out of my head now. Zah zah zah.
Cheers --
Win

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Butch7999
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Butch7999
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Joined: 18 Sep 2013, 06:21

12 Sep 2015, 03:00 #4

And completing the front-office crew's initial choices...
A guilty pleasure, maybe, but I think this is such a great tune it should be the national anthem.
Of what, I'm not sure, but the national anthem of something.
Never mind the spectacularly embarrassing video, which seems to involve war refugees from Middle Earth
being escorted through a dimensional portal by jump-suited time-travellers from a very kinky discotheque.
Just listen, don't watch. It's just a fantastically great song.
Also, not to be confused with the very different Bob Dylan song of the same name.
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stone193
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stone193
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14 Sep 2015, 20:00 #5

A number I once got in my head and couldn't get it out till I learned to play it note for note was Jenny, Jenny.

Here's a pic of me back in 1990 - just about the best band I ever played in back then. I was close with
everyone in the group - I still miss them to this day.

I have had the privilege to take lessons on the drums and guitar - can't sing a lick so I'll never be in demand
when a band needs another guitarist.

Oh well - I have had my share of fun.

Some day, I'll tell my story of backing up the Duprees back in 1962!

Here I am or not?



The world series was on at the time of us playing.
Mike
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1961Yankees
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1961Yankees
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20 Sep 2015, 21:02 #6

A big fan of 1960s music here ... that's basically what I play all day on my iPod at work.
Although my familiarity with the Zombies was confined to just their three big hits
(Tell Her No, She's Not There, and Time of the Season), I was always suspicious that
they were an under-appreciated group.

I recently acquired their greatest hits CD and after non-stop listening, I believe I am right.
One song in particular, Leave Me Be, is as good as anything they've ever done ...
even on the weekends I can still hear this haunting melody running through my head.

Let me know what you think.
Dave

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8y6lTDJLrcY

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stone193
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stone193
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04 Feb 2018, 22:11 #7

Wish I had taken the time to respond to the request to revisit the Zombies.
Saw them reprise their songs on cable a few years ago - definitely had lost a bit in terms of octaves from those days but still a treat to watch.
"She's not there" will  always be a keeper for me.

When the Brits "invaded" - was a knee-jerk reaction by me and my bandmates to keep playing the "American" songs - after all who could beat the "silky smooth" play of the Ventures?
However, since ya can't lick'm?  Join'm!

Everything Beatles was our calling card for some time.  Back then, I was playing drums - so the bourgeoning heavy metal sound of the Kinks e.g. - ignited me. 

Keith Moon?  My idle.
Ginger Baker?  Another love of my life.
Jim McCarty?  Pure energy (less known perhaps with the Yardbirds - still plays today at 74!)

So, I took my autographed drum sticks from Joe Morello (Dave Brubeck) that I acquired at the Metropol (which by the way turned into a go-go joint around 1966 - no more progressive jazz or anything civilized!) and got heavier - more aggressive sticks.  After all, Wipeout was hardly "Take Five" or "Blue Rondo a la Turk."  To add, for those who were fans of jazz - the time signature for the former is 5/4 and the latter 9/8!  Progressive?  I sure thought so!

Those were ground breaking IMO when most music was either 4/4, 2/4 or 3/4.

In closing.

Where's the turntable?

I heard The Clash - Rock the Casbah and can't get it out of my head.  I remember when we thought they were singing "Rob the cashbox" LOL.

And as Casey used to say:  "Keep your feet on the ground and keep reaching for the stars."   
Mike
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BaseballGamesBKW
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Joined: 25 Oct 2013, 10:10

08 Feb 2018, 23:39 #8

Hi again, Mike, thanks for the comments and reminiscences!  

All great drummers you named there -- we've gotta add to that list 
Gene Krupa, arguably the first rock n' roll drummer from before 
there even was rock n' roll.  That guy deserves a "biopic," and 
maybe he's too old now, but Hank Azaria woulda been excellent 
as Krupa, doncha think?  

"Rock the Casbah" -- heh, for years we thought one line was "Sharia 
don't like it"...  c'mon, that almost kinda made sense, eh?   Shoot, 
we should do a separate thread in here just for "misheard lyrics" -- 
in that vein, and since you mention Ginger Baker, here's a front-office 
favourite by Cream, some of the lyrics of which resonate deeply with 
some of us, while other parts not so much, including the bit we all 
originally heard as "Then I told you 'bout our kid: now he's not a 
tomato"...  

  
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stone193
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stone193
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09 Feb 2018, 16:01 #9



OK.
Time for another story.

It's 196-something and I'm playing in a high school group called the Rondells. 
We're playing in a beach club at Atlantic Beach, LI and Bobby Lewis of "Tossin & Turnin" fame will be the headliner - we're the opener/houseband for the nite.

Well.  Bobby is a no show and in his place was the Duprees - "You Belong to Me."
Wish I had pics.  

They show up with 1 guitar and a bass player - no drummer.  The guy who plays the guitar said:  "hey kid - ya wanna back us up?"  I said:  "sure!"
So, he says:  "watch me for the cuts and don't drag"  Back then songs were simple and they "telegraphed" the cuts by their simplicity.  So that's my only contact with "real" players! 
Mike
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BaseballGamesBKW
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Joined: 25 Oct 2013, 10:10

14 Feb 2018, 21:05 #10

Cool!  The closest "brush with fame" we can report here was the time 
one of us had a Courtney Cox - Bruce Springsteen moment, pulled up 
on stage by the lead "singer" of the punk band Green Jello to shout 
and dance with the band.  So was almost everyone else in the mosh pit, 
though, so it's not like that made him special.  
It was sorta like this, but several years earlier, with about a third of 
that crowd and without the puppets and props:  
  
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stone193
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14 Feb 2018, 22:20 #11

The closest "brush with fame" we can report
Definitely qualifies guys!

Now for the next story.

It's 1970-something.  I met a girl thru a friend named Diane who's "day job" is waiting on tables but is in a group called Desmond Child and Rouge.

Desmond Child is an amazingly prolific writer - he co-wrote La Vida Boca with Ricky Martin e.g., wrote and co-wrote songs for Bon Jovi like "You give love a bad name"; Aerosmith etc.

He failed as an act with Rouge - I have their only album that was given to me by Diane.



Diane is the middle female.

Now to my story.

Diane gets me tickets to a small gig that the group is doing in a place called Tracks or Trax?  Near Columbus Circle in Manhattan.

It's a "downstairs" venue - which was very small and seating was tight - and being a bit claustrophobic - I was very uncomfortable.

I went up to Diane who introduced me to Desmond (not what I would call affable) and she told me to look behind - Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley were there!  Honest?  Couldn't have picked them out in a lineup in 1970 something without their iconic makeup.

And most impressively - sitting and waiting?  Paul McCartney and John Lennon!  She said they were "big on" seeing new groups.

What a night!  Even if I spend half the time looking for the "exits."  

Postscript:

Fast forward to 1980-something and I'm watching Showtime and I see Gilda's live performance on Broadway.  And who do I see?

Diane and Rouge!  Diane's on the left.



Ya gotta love NYC!
Mike
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