Using the drawing board for a young audience

Using the drawing board for a young audience

Ben
Ben

November 26th, 2009, 8:38 pm #1

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 26th, 2009, 9:22 pm #2

With young kids I wouldn't explain it ahead of time....just let it be FUN! ... draw a picture (not telling them it's going to move) of a person (famous, the principal, a friend, some story figure) then let the eyes move. You do NOT see it. The kids go crazy.... You look but don't see... (extremely effective with young kids) it moves again... you look and it moves you jump...they laugh...it talks.... you jump...they laugh....you talk with it for a bit (use jokes, present some message, whatever) .... erase it.... wow I guess that's why they call these magic markers.

Ax
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Steve Petra
Steve Petra

November 26th, 2009, 10:21 pm #3

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
Yup, there is no need to explain the effect. Young kids aren't actually trying to figure it out, they're caught up in letting YOU know what's happening and they want to PLAY!

With young children and the MDB I always had success with the guessing game scenario. Ask them if they are good at guessing. Draw a shoe - they shout "shoe" then a fish, a tree etc. Then start drawing the parts of the face, by time you get to the eyes they're guessing "face" so ask them what else you need to make a face and so on.

have fun - almost impossible not to!
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Joined: June 4th, 2009, 1:22 am

November 27th, 2009, 2:48 am #4

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
I know that when I use the MDB its mostly involvement all I do is draw a circular type face and bring a few kids up to add mouth nose ears and hair I add the eyes...when they say the eyes are moving I say of course my eyes move so do all yours, they scream no the faces eyes are moving, I'll turn and look and of course they wouldn't be and ask them not to fool me and they eyes will move again...Then go about the fairytale and how witches make people see and do things... maybe your thinking the eyes are moving, they will move again they will scream but I will catch it this time....then the fun takes off....
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Joined: September 27th, 2006, 10:02 pm

November 27th, 2009, 6:02 pm #5

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
I tie it in with imagination, and talk about imaginary friends, and the one I had when I was little. His name was Tippytoes and I draw a picture of him and start to tell a funny (true) story about him.
Then he comes to life. Of course, he has some funny stories to tell about ME.
There's a clip from it on my video -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gisVaDHFTeo

Good luck!
John H
www.johnhadfield.net
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 27th, 2009, 7:46 pm #6

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
Everyone has their style I guess... but I would urge you NOT to present occult concepts like ghosts, demons and witches to young children in your shows.
Ax
Last edited by axtell on November 27th, 2009, 7:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 4th, 2009, 1:22 am

November 27th, 2009, 8:30 pm #7

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
Ax Thanks for the heads up It could be a story about anyone maybe a teacher, or the principal, maybe someone famous and while the kids are drawing him or her it will come to life because you already told them it would and the face goes about telling the kids educational funny information as as the kids come back up to erase each part of the person he goes back to where he came from only to return again for other short stories...
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Ben
Ben

November 29th, 2009, 2:09 pm #8

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
Thanks for all your suggestions.

I have made the following youtube video describing how I use the magic drawing board:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZo_X5AbRY8

As always, I would appreciate any constructive feedback that you have.

Ben.

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Tony Borders
Tony Borders

November 29th, 2009, 4:20 pm #9

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
There is a live performance of the Ax-Trax Art-o-matic on youtube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsvsD1MQ ... re=related
This is particularly good for getting more time out of your board or for non-ventriloquists who want to use the board.
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Joined: June 4th, 2009, 1:22 am

November 29th, 2009, 5:50 pm #10

Hi:

I am hoping that someone may have some ideas for me.

I am not a ventriloquist. When I use the magic drawing board for children aged 3 to 6, I tell them that I think that a ghost has got into the drawing board and that is why the eyes and mouth are moving. This usually works very well, but yesterday a child started crying and the teacher had to take him out of the audience. She later told me that he kept repeating "I don't like ghosts, I don't like ghosts".

I think I should use a different story line than the ghost.

One idea I had was to tell them that a wizard has cast a spell on the drawing board. I think this would be less scary than a ghost.

Does any one have any other ideas?

Ben.
There are many ways to use the magic drawing board when you are working with kids you can make a snow ball who tells you about winter and the fun people have playing catch with him.

If the kids are young enough instead of a nose make clock hands of course the eyes and the mouth make the numbers around the clock face and it could be a clock teaching the kids to tell the time... as you are placing each item tell them what your doing and that clocks TELL the time..well so does this clock its a special clock and you can erase the hands and reset the time or ask what timew the kids get up in the morning what time they go to school what time do they have dinner home work or go to sleep there are so many different times of the day....

Hope this helps you
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