Moderators: JosieG, Melissa, flea dip

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

11:06 PM - May 16, 2017 #91

McDonald's customer's horror 'after finding rubber GLOVE in cheeseburger'

Research: no matter how much you exercise, weight loss will remain elusive unless you cut sugar
  • by A. Walton

    In a fascinating and scorching editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, three authors argue that the myth that exercise is the key to weight loss – and to health – is erroneous and pervasive, and that it must end.

    The evidence that diet matters more than exercise is now overwhelming, they write, and has got to be heeded:
    We can exercise to the moon and back but still be fat for all the sugar and carbs we consume.

    And perhaps even more jarring is that we can be a normal weight and exercise, and still be unhealthy if we’re eating poorly.

    So, they say, we need a basic reboot of our understanding of health, which has to involve the food industry’s powerful PR “machinery,” since that was part of the problem to begin with.

    The major point the team makes – which they say the public doesn’t really understand – is that exercise in and of itself doesn’t really lead to weight loss. It may lead to a number of excellent health effects, but weight loss – if you’re not also restricting calories – isn’t one of them.
    “Regular physical activity reduces the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia and some cancers by at least 30%,” they write. “However, physical activity does not promote weight loss.”

    Plus, in the last 30 years, exercise has stayed about the same, while overweight and obesity have skyrocketed. So something else must be at play – like the type of food we’re eating.

    That part has gotten steadily worse over the years, as highly-processed sugary foods and sodas have taken over as our go-to choices. “According to the Lancet global burden of disease reports,” they write, “poor diet now generates more disease than physical inactivity, alcohol and smoking combined.” This is a disturbing statistic. But it gets worse.

    ...What we know to be true is much simpler: "Sugar calories promote fat storage and hunger," the write. "Fat calories induce fullness or satiation." For every additional 150 calories in sugar (i.e., a can of soda) a person consumes per day, the risk for diabetes rises 11-fold, regardless of how much or little we exercise. The single most effective thing people can do for their weight, they write, is to restrict calories – and even more, restrict carbohydrates.
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

10:35 PM - Jul 28, 2017 #92

Too Fat To Ride at the OWA?
  • OWA, Alabama's newest amusement park, has been only open for one week, but it's operators are knee-deep in a controversy over gender-specific weight restrictions for its rides.

    "This is not a park for fat people," a social media poster said.

    "I'm a thick woman. Just wondering now if I will be able to ride," another question.

    "OWA people are ignorant," slammed another.

    The 21-ride Park at OWA, which opened Friday, issued a response to its ride restrictions earlier this week. Those restrictions amounted to suggestions that "guests of larger size" might not be accommodated for certain rides.

    But it's the descriptive nature that got park's operators, Creek Indian Enterprise Development Authority, into hot water. Specifically, the park stated that guests who exceeded 6 feet, 2 inches in height and weighed over 225 pounds and had a 40-inch waistline or a 52-inch chest, could face restrictions.

    The restrictions went further by singling out women who weigh 200 pounds or those who wear a size 18 or larger.

    "It is pretty much at the discretion of any particular park on the variety of their restrictions," said Martin Lewison, an assistant professor of business management at Farmingdale State College in New York, who researches the theme park industry. He also visited The Park at OWA on its opening weekend.

    "Often the restrictions are fairly descriptive. But it's usually pertaining to things like 'you must be able to hold on with two hands,' which they would be referring to prosthetics. Normally, you'll get kind of generic language where it says that 'guests of a certain size' or 'body type' may not fit into this ride."

    Industry trends

    The Park at OWA, in a statement released Tuesday, acknowledged it had received inquiries into its posted rider safety restrictions. The statement reads, "It was never our intent to offend any person or group by the language in our rider safety restrictions. Restrictions implemented by The Park at OWA are provided by the ride manufacturer to ensure the safety of our guests and employees."

    The statement also specifies which guests can ride on some of the park's thrill rides, including its featured attraction, the Rollin' Thunder roller coaster.

    ...The restrictions are nothing new for the amusement park industry, though long-established facilities like Disney World in Orlando and Disneyland in Anaheim do not post any specific height or weight restrictions.

    Some parks do. At Cedar Point in northern Ohio, the same language that was posted on OWA's website is published with their literature specifying height and weight restrictions for female guests.

    At Alabama Splash Adventure in Bessemer, all rides and water park attractions are designed to accommodate guests of larger size, unless the ride is considered a true kiddie ride, said president Dan Koch.

    But the park does not have suggested restrictions based on gender.

    Koch said that generally speaking, if a guest can fit into the restraint system of a ride, they are allowed to continue. Only in cases of extreme obesity, he said, is a guest precluded from riding the park's rides.

    ...Theme parks, nationwide, have included additions and designs to address heavier guests. For instance, tester seats are sometimes installed near the entrance of a ride's line allowing guests to check to see if they can physically fit into it. Some ride manufacturers will add wider seats to accommodate bigger guests.

    'Guest safety'

    For The Park at OWA, the restrictions were based on the manufacturer requirements, which suggests that "guests of particular body types may not be accommodated."
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

6:41 AM - Sep 26, 2017 #93

Doctors in three countries tried to save the ‘world’s heaviest woman.’ Now they mourn her.
  • An Egyptian national believed at one point to be the “world’s heaviest woman” died Monday at a hospital in the United Arab Emirates, putting a tragic end to a months-long campaign — spanning three countries — to save her life.

    Eman Ahmed Abd El Aty passed away at 4:35 a.m. local time Monday, according to Burjeel Hospital in Abu Dhabi. Her death at age 37 was caused by complications from her weight, including heart and kidney failure, the hospital said.

    ....And then there was the herculean task of moving Abd El Aty from her home in the Egyptian port city of Alexandria — which she hadn’t left in nearly 25 years — to the hospital in Mumbai, where Lakdawala would perform the bariatric procedure.

    Abd El Aty was first put on blood thinners to reduce the risk of a pulmonary embolism during the transfer, according to her blog. Locals constructed a special bed with wheels that could hold her weight once she was out of the house.

    Video shot by the family showed a crane lifting Abd El Aty — lying in her specially made bed — out of a window of her home on an unspecified floor of an Alexandria building.
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

4:49 AM - Oct 12, 2017 #94

The number of obese children and teenagers worldwide is 10 times higher than it was four decades ago, research finds
  • The number of obese children and teenagers worldwide is 10 times higher than it was four decades ago, according to research from the World Health Organization and Imperial College London published Tuesday in The Lancet.

    In addition, 213 million boys and girls were overweight but not obese last year according to the study, which looked at data from 200 countries.

    In real numbers, 124 million young people ages 5 to 19 were obese in 2016 compared to 11 million in 1975, the study showed.

    Researchers analyzed data from 2,416 population-based studies that measured the height and weight of 31.5 million people between the ages of 5 and 19.

    “These data highlight, remind and reinforce that overweight and obesity is a global health crisis today, and threatens to worsen in coming years unless we start taking drastic action,” Fiona Bull, program coordinator for surveillance and population-based prevention of noncommunicable diseases at WHO, said in a statement.

    In the U.S., 7.5 million boys and 6.1 million girls were obese in 2016, the study found. In comparison, 1.6 million girls and 1.7 million boys were obese in the U.S. in 1975.

    In recent years, obesity rates have become more stable in high-income countries, including the U.S., but they continue to rise in low- and middle-income countries, Majid Ezzati, lead author of the study and professor at Imperial College’s School of Public Health, said in a statement.

    “These worrying trends reflect the impact of food marketing and policies across the globe, with healthy, nutritious foods too expensive for poor families and communities,” Ezzati said in a statement.

    In many middle-income countries in Latin America, East Asia and the Caribbean, children and teenagers have quickly gone from being mostly underweight to mostly overweight. The trend puts these children at a greater risk of disease, said Ezzati.

    “The trend predicts a generation of children and adolescents growing up obese and at greater risk of diseases, like diabetes,” he said. “We need ways to make healthy, nutritious food more available at home and school, especially in poor families and communities, and regulations and taxes to protect children from unhealthy foods.”
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

11:19 PM - Oct 13, 2017 #95

America’s Obesity Epidemic Reaches Record High, New Report Says
  • Oct 2017

    America's obesity crisis appears more unstoppable than ever.

    A troubling new report released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that almost 40 percent of American adults and nearly 20 percent of adolescents are obese — the highest rates ever recorded for the U.S.

    "It's difficult to be optimistic at this point," said Dr. Frank Hu, chair of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. "The trend of obesity has been steadily increasing in both children and adults despite many public health efforts to improve nutrition and physical activity."

    ..What the CDC report doesn't reveal is why the obesity crisis continues to worsen. A recent study by epidemiologists at Georgia Southern University discovered that fewer Americans, particularly women, are trying to lose weight.

    Public health experts say that an unhealthy diet and the lack of exercise are still the two biggest culprits.

    "There’s still a huge amount of cheap, accessible, highly processed food available everywhere almost anytime," says Hu. "And despite people doing more recreational activity these days, the overall activity level, household activity and occupational activity has decreased in recent years."

    In addition to unhealthy foods and a sedentary lifestyle, there could be another possible reason for the increasing obesity rates: sleep deprivation.


    An estimated 50 million and 70 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders or sleep deprivation, according to the Institute of Medicine.

    Inadequate sleep is a risk factor for childhood and adult obesity, says Hu. Sleep-deprived people may be too tired to exercise, take in more calories and may undergo hormones changes that control appetite.
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

5:34 PM - Feb 26, 2018 #96

Millennials are fattest generation in history
  • Feb 2018

    Millennials are on course to be the most overweight generation in history, with more than seven in ten carrying extra pounds before they hit middle age, according to the latest analysis.

    Those born between the early 1980s and late 1990s are much more likely to be overweight or obese than their parents were, the research found.

    Despite millennials being associated with diets such as clean eating, more than 70 per cent will be overweight or obese between the ages of 35 and 44. This would make them the most overweight generation on record. About half of baby boomers, born between 1945 and 1955, were overweight or obese at the same age.

    Cancer Research UK, which carried out the analysis, warned that the younger generation was…
Millennials Fattest Generation, new study shows
  • Feb 2018

    Cancer Research UK says people born between early 80s and mid-90s set to overtake baby boomers

    Millennials are set to be the fattest generation of Britons, with 70% dangerously overweight before they hit middle age, research shows.

    People born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s are set to overtake baby boomers as the age group with the highest proportion of overweight or obese people, according to Cancer Research UK.

    While half the postwar generation were too heavy by the time they reached 35 to 44, more than seven in 10 millennials will be by 2026-28. That would make them the most overweight age group in British history, Cancer Research said.

    Prof Linda Bauld, a cancer prevention expert at the charity, said the projection showed many millennials, despite their reputation for “following seemingly healthy food trends”, needed to improve their eating habits, cut down on junk food and eat more fruit, vegetables and fibre.

    The trend among millennials is worrying because carrying excess weight as an adult is linked to 13 types of cancer, including breast, bowel and kidney cancer, Cancer Research said.

    “These figures paint a worrying picture for the future. We cannot overlook concrete evidence that being overweight increases the risk of developing breast cancer,” said Rachel Rawson, a senior clinical nurse specialist at Breast Cancer Care.

    “It’s within our grasp to make simple lifestyle changes like bumping up exercise and eating a healthy balanced diet. However, other risk factors – such as being a woman and getting older – remain out of women’s control,” she added.

    The World Cancer Research Fund said the number of adults and children worldwide at increased risk of the disease because they are obese had risen sharply since 1975.
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

12:22 AM - Mar 25, 2018 #97

American adults just keep getting fatter
  • BY MATT RICHTEL AND ANDREW JACOBS
    March 24, 2018 09:30 AM

    U.S. adults continue to put on the pounds.

    New data show that nearly 40 percent of them were obese in 2015 and 2016, a sharp increase from a decade earlier, federal health officials reported Friday.

    The prevalence of severe obesity in U.S. adults is also rising, heightening their risks of developing heart disease, diabetes and various cancers.

    According to the latest data, published Friday in JAMA, 7.7 percent of U.S. adults were severely obese in the same period.

    The data – gathered in a large-scale federal survey that is considered the gold standard for health data – measured trends in obesity from 2015 and 2016 back to 2007 and 2008, when 5.7 percent of U.S. adults were severely obese and 33.7 percent were obese.

    The survey counted people with a body mass index of 30 or more as obese, and those with a BMI of 40 or more as severely obese.

    Public health experts said that they were alarmed by the continuing rise in obesity among adults and by the fact that efforts to educate people about the health risks of a poor diet do not seem to be working.

    “Most people know that being overweight or obese is unhealthy, and if you eat too much that contributes to being overweight,” said Dr. James Krieger, clinical professor of medicine at the University of Washington and executive director of Healthy Food America, an advocacy group. “But just telling people there’s a problem doesn’t solve it.”

    The latest data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey come at a time when the food industry is pushing back against stronger public health measures aimed at combating obesity.

    In recent NAFTA negotiations, the Trump administration has proposed rules favored by major food companies that would limit the ability of the United States, Mexico and Canada to require prominent labels on packaged foods warning about the health risks of foods high in sugar and fat.

    While the latest survey data do not explain why Americans continue to get heavier, nutritionists and other experts cite lifestyle, genetics and, most importantly, a poor diet as factors.

    U.S. fast-food sales rose 22.7 percent from 2012-2017, according to Euromonitor, while packaged-food sales rose 8.8 percent.
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

3:29 AM - May 13, 2018 #98

The Obesity Cure Is Out of Reach in the Heaviest States
  • Bariatric surgery works, but hundreds of thousands of eligible patients can’t get it.

    by OLGA KHAZAN
    MAY 7, 2018 HEALTH

    In Mississippi, more than 37 percent of adults are obese, making it the second-most obese state in the nation.

    But Mississippi is also one of two states, along with Montana, that doesn’t cover bariatric surgery in its Medicaid program, which serves 760,000 people.

    One popular type of bariatric surgery, the gastric sleeve, costs between $20,000 and $35,000 without insurance, experts told me.

    It shrinks the stomach to about the size of a banana, changing the body’s hunger hormones and reducing a person’s natural weight—one they don’t have to starve themselves to stick to.

    For the morbidly obese, diet and exercise don’t usually have this same effect on their own.

    (People who lost hundreds of pounds sweating it out on the TV show The Biggest Loser, for example, tended to gain it all back.)

    People who get bariatric surgery have to change their eating habits dramatically, and it comes with the risk of complications like bleeding or digestive issues.

    Still, studies show bariatric surgery is more effective long-term than diet and exercise for people who are more than 100 pounds overweight, especially if they have other medical problems like diabetes.

    To put it most starkly, the surgery cuts obese peoples’ risk of death in half.

    But experts and surgeons say the procedure is treated by insurance companies less like a life-saving treatment and more like a nose job: frivolous and optional. According to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), many states don’t cover the procedure in their state employee, Obamacare, or Medicaid plans:

    [snip maps]

    Blue Cross Blue Shield, the only Obamacare insurer in South Carolina, does not cover bariatric surgery for the more than 200,000 enrollees in that state.

    The state also doesn’t cover the procedure for state employees and their spouses and children, another half a million people.
    “Keeping the plan affordable for everyone is one of our biggest challenges and, unfortunately, it results in certain services not being a covered benefit of the plan,” a spokesperson for peba, South Carolina’s state employee health plan, told me via email.

    ...What’s more, “even in a state where there’s technically coverage, there are so many barriers to getting surgery, it’s like not having coverage at all,” said Scott Kahan, the director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness in Washington, D.C.

    ...Some states’ insurance plans require people considering bariatric surgery to quit smoking, for example, while others don’t.

    In some states, surgery candidates must lose weight before they qualify, while in others, the weight loss is recommended, but optional.

    Other states require a six-month waiting period. According to the ASMBS, Aetna requires bariatric surgery candidates not to gain any weight during the three-month preoperative phase— something that’s challenging for individuals whose biggest problem is that they gain weight uncontrollably.

    (“The preoperative program is intended to improve surgical outcomes, reduce the potential for surgical complications, and establish the member's ability to comply with post-operative medical care and dietary restrictions,” an Aetna spokesperson told me via email.)

    Meanwhile, some people who have United Healthcare must do the opposite—fail at weight loss. They have to have unsuccessfully followed “one structured diet program for six consecutive months,” such as Weight Watchers. These hurdles are portrayed as medically necessary, until they aren’t: Roxane Gay, a writer who recently described her own bariatric surgery experience on Medium, wrote that she was able to easily overcome all of this red tape by simply paying for her surgery out of pocket.

    In part because of these hurdles, only a small number— about 1 or 2 percent—of people who qualify for bariatric surgery actually get the operation.

    John Scott, a bariatric surgeon in Greenville, South Carolina and the national “access to care” chairman at the ASMBS, said many people in his state go to Mexico for bariatric surgery.

    It’s thousands of dollars cheaper there, but complications arise more frequently. “We’ve had patients come back from Mexico with leaks and infections from poorly performed surgery,” he said. “The state washes their hands, from an insurance perspective, and the patient is on the hook for whatever expenses [arise] from the complication.”
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

1:14 AM - Jul 28, 2018 #99

Brit Tourists 'too Fat' to Ride Donkeys on Greek island Santorini – so Locals are cross-breeding stronger Mules
  • July 2018

    Donkeys on the picturesque Greek island of Santorini are being crippled by carrying overweight holidaymakers, animal charities say.

    Locals have even started breeding their donkeys with stronger mules so it is easier for them to carry fatter tourists.

    The animals have traditionally been used to carry visitors up the hundreds of cobbled steps and steep hills on the popular cruise ship stop-off.

    But campaigners claim they are being forced to carry ever-heavier loads, causing spinal injuries and open wounds from ill-fitting saddles.

    A spokesman for charity Help the Santorini Donkeys said: “They’re having to resort to using cross-bred mules, as the donkeys just aren’t strong enough.

    “It’s recommended animals carry no more than 20% of their body weight.

    “Obese and overweight tourists com­­bined with the lack of shade and water, heat and cobbled steps is what’s causing such a problem.”

    He added: “There should be a weight restriction. With donkeys it should be no more than eight stone, but how would that be imposed?”

    ... She said since then, the number of overweight US, Russian and British tourists has trebled, add­­ing: “Donkeys are pretty much in work year-round.

    “They are made to work in terrible conditions without adequate water, shelter or rest, and then I find them tied outside my shelter, barely alive.”

    UK-based The Donkey Sanctuary said: “[We do] not promote the use of donkeys and mules in any form of tourism.”
Quote
Like
Share

flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
flea dip
Ultimate Madonna Hater
Joined: 9:01 PM - Jun 02, 2005

11:39 PM - Sep 18, 2018 #100

I hate British measurement.
What is 16 stone? Is that 500 pounds?


Severely obese boy, 13, collapses and dies at 16 stone

A 13-year-old has collapsed and died due to being severely obese at 16 stone.

The teenager is believed to be the youngest victim of the frightening rise in youngsters who are overweight.

A post mortem by a pathologist said he could find no other reason for the clot developing apart from the youngster’s ‘severe’ obesity.

He ruled the death was natural and decided there would be no inquest.

Experts described the death as shocking and a sobering indication of the seriousness of the obesity epidemic affecting the nation’s children.

One said: ‘I have never heard of a child so young having their death put down to obesity. It just shows how bad things are getting.

...The boy – who is not being named to protect the family’s privacy – had been to see his GP the day before he died complaining of swollen feet.

The post mortem report noted the boy had been gaining weight from a young age.

By the time he died earlier this year he had a body mass index of 42 and was twice his recommended weight.

NHS school nurses weighed the boy when he was 10 and sent a letter home to his parents about his weight but it was apparently never followed up.

The boy’s post mortem report also showed he had an enlarged liver with evidence of fatty liver disease, an early sign of liver failure due to obesity.
Quote
Like
Share