African Americans and Ancient Egyptians

samysamy25
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samysamy25
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July 28th, 2010, 7:52 pm #1

African Americans and Ancient Egyptians


African Americans: A Pan-African people


The north western slave port at Goree Island, Senegal was only one of several points of departure for Africans being taken to the United States. There were other points as well, stretching as far southward as the present state of Angola. These ports of departure were used for transporting Africans from the African interior - a vast interior; this was the standard method of European colonialism to move African resources from the interior to the ports, where roads and rail routes were built expressly for this purpose.




The ethnic origin of African Americans includes, but is not limited to, the following African peoples:

Sub-saharan west Africa to the Gulf of Guinea;


Mossi, Senufo, Mande, Fulani, Toubou, Fulbe, Sara, Moussei, Massa, Wolof, Akan, Ewe, Mandinga, Hausa, Yoruba, Ibo, Kanuri, Ibibio, Tiv, Ijaw , Urhobo , Gwari , Bambara ...



Angola South;

Ovimbundu, Kimbundu, Mongo, Luba, Kongo, Mangbetu-Azande, Fang, Punu, Nzeiby, Mbede ...

In everything, there is both positive as well as negative elements. One of the positive elements of the African slave trade to the United States, was that it created the first contemporary Pan-African ethnic group; a group with a common language and culture and separated only by class distinctions.



To their credit, African Americans, despite the insidious European labeling of some African Americans as 'mulattoes,' 'quadroons,' etc., clearly rejected the caste system that was adopted in Haiti or Jamaica (or South Africa) for example. Marcus Garvey, when he first brought his movement from Jamaica, found this out the hard way, when he tried to use this caste distinction from Jamaica in the USA vis-a-vis WEB DuBois.To Garvey's credit, he quickly adjusted his thinking to this African American ideology of a caste-free community.

African Americans have the unique distinction of being historically-genetically related to a vast majority of African ethnic-linguistic groups. In this sense, the African American identification to all African cultures is not merely a philosophical one, as in the case of a European Swede identifying with a European ancient Greece; The African Americans' identification with all African cultures, including and especially, the ancient Nile valley cultures, is both historically and genetically authentic and valid.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_groups_in_Africa

African American Culture :

African-American culture in the United States refers to the cultural contributions of Americans of African descent to the culture of the United States, either as part of or distinct from American culture. The distinct identity of African American culture is rooted in the historical experience of the African American people, including the Middle Passage, and thus the culture retains a distinct identity while at the same time it is enormously influential to American culture as a whole.

African American culture is rooted in Africa. It is a blend of chiefly sub-Saharan African and Sahelean cultures. Although slavery greatly restricted the ability of Americans of African descent to practice their cultural traditions, many practices, values, and beliefs survived and over time have modified or blended with European American culture. There are some facets of African American culture that were accentuated by the slavery period. The result is a unique and dynamic culture that has had and continues to have a profound impact on mainstream American culture, as well as the culture of the broader world.

After emancipation, unique African American traditions continued to flourish, as distinctive traditions or radical innovations in music, art, literature, religion, cuisine, and other fields. While for some time sociologists, such as Gunnar Myrdal and Patrick Moynihan, believed that African Americans had lost most cultural ties with Africa, anthropological field research by Melville Herskovits and others demonstrated that there is a continuum of African traditions among Africans of the Diaspora. The greatest influence of African cultural practices on European culture is found below the Mason-Dixon in the American South.

For many years African American culture developed separately from mainstream American culture because of the persistence of racial discrimination in America, as well as African American slave descendants' desire to maintain their own traditions. Today, African American culture has become a significant part of American culture and yet, at the same time, remains a distinct cultural body

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_American_culture



Arabs And East African Sub-Saharan Ancestory

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luipp
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July 28th, 2010, 8:39 pm #2

wrote:Mzungu is preferred because Central and East Africa people do not link people of European origin to the "white" color. This is because the concept of color coding ethinicities is not a part of their culture. Actually they consider people of European origin to be reddish or pinkish. [4][5]For instance in Kinyarwanda and Kirundi European people are also known as rutuku which means red.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mzungu
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Toiletman
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July 28th, 2010, 8:45 pm #3

And where is the connection to ancient egypt? Not really there except in the myths of modern Black Americans.
If you take anything in this forum overly serious, you should really go and see a doctor.
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Just American
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July 30th, 2010, 1:22 am #4

I don't feel any longing to connect with any modern or ancient culture in Europe, anymore. As I got out of being an adolescent, I realized it was a romantic pipe dream that could easily lead to some really stupid beliefs. I'm an American, and being of roughly Germanic and Celtic descent is a mere formality that has no bearing on my success or happiness in daily life. I have more in common with the people I grew up with and work with every day whether they're Black, White, Asian or Hispanic than I do with anyone in Europe, even the ones I'm distanty related to. I don't buy into that concept of 'Old American Stock' that's been peddled around for about 100 years, either, even though my ancestry matches that 'stock' perfectly. Identitiy politics are just a waste of time and they're bait used by demagogues.
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luipp
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luipp
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July 30th, 2010, 1:45 am #5

Oh a 'Patriot'. A wanabee Palin Jewturd. NEXT.
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Just American
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July 30th, 2010, 1:55 am #6

Keep reveling in your own stupidity. And whatever you do, don't try to form a coherent thought, you're more entertaining like this.
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luipp
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July 30th, 2010, 2:39 am #7

Just American wrote:Keep reveling in your own stupidity. And whatever you do, don't try to form a coherent thought, you're more entertaining like this.
Palin. Accept it pedo. PATRIOT! Suck it in. Wallow in yourself. Maggot....
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four
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August 2nd, 2010, 2:56 pm #8

Not sure the motive of this thread.
The top post is great except for the picture of the Mursi.
Although the slave ports were in certain places, African Americans do come from all different parts of Africa; North South East and West.
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samysamy25
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August 8th, 2010, 8:18 pm #9

afro-americans are not from different parts of africa , this is an afrocentric lie !
afro-americans are from mozambique and west sub-saharan africa just this.

this maps summarizes all the afro-american history :






Arabs And East African Sub-Saharan Ancestory

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Funk
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August 8th, 2010, 8:21 pm #10

Some of the slaves were from Madagascar?
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samysamy25
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August 8th, 2010, 8:36 pm #11

maybe for afro-americans of America Latina but those of USA and Canada are from :

37% from Angola/Congo
4% Senegambia
9% serra Leone
12% Gold Coast
15% bight of Biafra
13% bight of Benin


Arabs And East African Sub-Saharan Ancestory

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four
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August 9th, 2010, 12:47 pm #12

samysamy25 wrote:maybe for afro-americans of America Latina but those of USA and Canada are from :

37% from Angola/Congo
4% Senegambia
9% serra Leone
12% Gold Coast
15% bight of Biafra
13% bight of Benin

People of African descent that live in South America are even more Homogeneously African than those that live in North America.
You are really showing me a list of Slave ports.
The majority may come from a few places but Slaves were taken from the entire continent and SHIPPED from those respective locations.
The last paper that sampled Different African Americans groups found Ancestry from Nilosaharan, Chadic, Fulani, Mandinka ancestry all from 20-40%
Pygmy and Cushitic ancestry hit maxes around 10%

If they will march a West African Negro ALL THE WAY northward through the Sahara best believe the will march a pygmy, Dinka, etc to the coast probably picking up Africans along the way.
North central Africans such as the Azande successful and repeatedly fought off slavers. Have you read about slavery sources from the Congo?
Funk wrote:Some of the slaves were from Madagascar?
Yes, few in number though, like all places in Africa other than the "Slave Coast".
On 23andme:
I have met a few African Americans that are M1a, M1b1, L3f, L3h, J2a2(mtdna) as well as Afram men that are E1b1b~ E1a, B2a1a, B* etc
I have profiled an Afram who claims ancestry from Ethiopia that is J2a1b* and another Afram that is R1b (V-88).
I think Chris Rock was V-88 too.

Hell I am L0a~ with closest matches in the Horn, Burkina Faso, Nile valley and Sahara. (Ethio, Tuareg, Nubian, Egyptian, Hausa, Chad)
Afram Ethnicity is not as simplistic as some make it to be. Newer studies are adding clarity to this. The information Africans and people of African descent have shared between themselves proves this not to be an "Afro-centric lie"
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samysamy25
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August 9th, 2010, 1:52 pm #13

The majority of African Americans descend from slaves, most of whom were sold into slavery as prisoners of war by African states or kidnapped by African, European or American slave traders. The existing market for slaves in Africa was exploited and expanded by European powers in need of labor for New World plantations.

The American slave population was made up of the various ethnic groups from western and central Africa, including the Bakongo, Igbo, Mandé, Wolof, Akan, Fon and Makua amongst others. Over time in most areas of the Americas, these different peoples did away with tribal differences and forged a new history and culture that was a creolization of their common pasts and present.

Studies of contemporary documents reveal seven regions from which Africans were sold or taken during the Atlantic slave trade. These regions were

* Senegambia, encompassing the coast from the Senegal River to the Casamance River, where captives as far away as the Upper and Middle Niger River Valley were sold;
* The Sierra Leone region included territory from the Casamance to the Assini River in the modern countries of Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Côte d'Ivoire;
* The Gold Coast region consisted of mainly modern Ghana;
* The Bight of Benin region stretched from the Volta River to the Benue River in modern Togo, Benin and southwestern Nigeria;
* The Bight of Biafra extended from southeastern Nigeria through Cameroon into Gabon;
* West Central Africa, the largest region, included the Congo and Angola; and
* The region of Mozambique-Madagascar included the modern countries of Mozambique, parts of Tanzania and Madagascar.

Origins and Percentages of African Americans imported into British North America and Louisiana (1700–1820) :
Region / Percentage

West Central Africa / 26.1%
Bight of Biafra / 24.4%
Sierra Leone / 15.8%
Senegambia / 14.5%
Gold Coast / 13.1%
Bight of Benin / 4.3%
Mozambique-Madagascar / 1.8%


[blockquote]The first African slaves were brought to Jamestown, Virginia in 1619. The English settlers treated these captives as indentured servants and released them after a number of years. This practice was gradually replaced by the system of race-based slavery used in the Caribbean. As servants were freed, they became competition for resources. Additionally, released servants had to be replaced. This, combined with the still ambiguous nature of the social status of Blacks and the difficulty in using any other group of people as forced servants, led to the relegation of Blacks into slavery. Massachusetts was the first colony to legalize slavery in 1641. Other colonies followed suit by passing laws that passed slavery on to the children of slaves and making non-Christian imported servants slaves for life.
A former slave displays the telltale criss-cross, keloid scars from being bullwhipped.

Africans first arrived in 1619, when a Dutch ship sold 19 blacks as indentured servants (not slaves) to Englishmen at Jamestown, Virginia. In all, about 10-12 million Africans were transported to Western Hemisphere. The vast majority of these people came from that stretch of the West African coast extending from present-day Senegal to Angola; a small percentage came from Madagascar and East Africa. Only 3% (about 300,000) went to the American colonies. The vast majority went to the West Indies, where they died quickly. Demographic conditions were highly favorable in the American colonies, with less disease, more food, some medical care, and lighter work loads than prevailed in the sugar fields.

At first the Africans in the South were outnumbered by white indentured servants, who came voluntarily from Britain. They avoided the plantations. With the vast amount of good land and the shortage of laborers, plantation owners turned to lifetime slaves who worked for their keep but were not paid wages and could not easily escape. Slaves had some legal rights (it was a crime to kill a slave, and a few whites were hung for it.) Generally the slaves developed their own family system, religion and customs in the slave quarters with little interference from owners, who were only interested in work outputs.

By 1700 there were 25,000 slaves in the American colonies, about 10% of the population. A few had come from Africa but most came from the West Indies (especially Barbados), or, increasingly, were native born. Their legal status was now clear: they were slaves for life and so were the children of slave mothers. They could be sold, or freed, and a few ran away. Slowly a free black population emerged, concentrated in port cities along the Atlantic coast from Charleston to Boston. Slaves in the cities and towns had many more privileges, but the great majority of slaves lived on southern tobacco or rice plantations, usually in groups of 20 or more.

The most serious slave rebellion was the Stono Uprising, in September 1739 in South Carolina. The colony had about 56,000 slaves, who outnumbered whites 2:1. About 150 slaves rose up, and seizing guns and ammunition, murdered twenty whites, and headed for Spanish Florida. The local militia soon intercepted and killed most of them.

All the American colonies had slavery, but it was usually the form of personal servants in the North (where 2% of the people were slaves), and field hands in plantations in the South (where 25% were slaves.)[/blockquote]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African-American_history

What was the Triangular Trade?


The first stage of the Triangular Trade involved taking manufactured goods from Europe to Africa: cloth, spirit, tobacco, beads, cowrie shells, metal goods, and guns. The guns were used to help expand empires and obtain more slaves (until they were finally used against European colonizers). These goods were exchanged for African slaves.

The second stage of the Triangular Trade (the middle passage) involved shipping the slaves to the Americas.

The third, and final, stage of the Triangular Trade involved the return to Europe with the produce from the slave-labor plantations: cotton, sugar, tobacco, molasses and rum.



How Did the Europeans Obtain the Slaves?


Between 1450 and the end of the nineteenth century, slaves were obtained from along the west coast of Africa with the full and active co-operation of African kings and merchants. (There were occasional military campaigns organized by Europeans to capture slaves, especially by the Portuguese in what is now Angola, but this accounts for only a small percentage of the total.)

A Multitude of Ethnic Groups

Senegambia includes the Wolof, Mandinka, Sereer and Fula; Upper Gambia has the Temne, Mende, and Kissi; the Windward Coast has the Vai, De, Bassa, and Grebo.




Arrival in the Americas

As a result of the slave trade, five times as many Africans arrived in the Americas than Europeans. Slaves were needed on plantations and for mines and the majority was shipped to Brazil, the Caribbean, and the Spanish Empire. Less than 5% traveled to the Northern American States formally held by the British.



http://africanhistory.about.com/od/slav ... tic001.htm

Afro-americans Y-DNA: Bantuid sub-saharan and European ancestory

http://s1.zetaboards.com/anthroscape/to ... 227/1/#new


so far for being something special or to be related to Nilots/Chadic and North africans except with big black afrocentric Lies





Arabs And East African Sub-Saharan Ancestory

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four
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August 9th, 2010, 7:31 pm #14

LOL Why are you so stupid and pigheaded?
There is nothing "Special" about being from a different part of Africa, that is just the totality and reality of a Slave Trade.

"Most" or "The Majority" is not the Totality of African American ancestry. That is the point. Even looking at the link you found:

A-M91 - 1 individual
B-M60 - 2 Individuals
E-M96* - 1 Individual
E-M33 - 5 Individuals
E-M75 - 1 Individuals
E1b1* PN2* - 1 Individual
E-M35 - 1 Individual
E-M78 - 2 Individuals
R-V88 - 1 Individual

E-M2~ 71 Individuals

So out of the total (88) African American Individuals sampled with African specific Haplogroups, (17) individuals........19%........or about 1 out of 5 have Y-DNA signatures that are Rare to the area in question (The Slave Coast) and have have origins and Highest frequencies away from this area.

Why do you say such dumb things when the information is right in front of your face? :lol: The evidence you post refutes exactly what you are saying. :nuts:
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samysamy25
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August 9th, 2010, 8:35 pm #15

don't worry this is one of ur family ! just remember him ... when ur ancestors have a beautiful life in the Jungles before 300years ago with their Monkeys wifes



Frequency and distribution of the Subclades of E-PN2 in African Americans in the United States:
The total frequency of E-PN2 subclades with some E2a sub-glades




[blockquote][blockquote]E1b1a/M2 is also the most common Y haplogroup in African Americans (50-75%), a result of slave trade from Sub-Saharan Africa. In South America, the estimates are ~8% for the M2 subclade. Subclades of E1b1a (defined by SNPs U181, M291, U174, U290, U175) have been examined only in African and European American populations, where they are present in the former and absent in the latter. U174 or E1b1a7a is the most prevalent at about 24% of African Americans. The E1b1a7 (M191) subclade is closely associated with the phylogeography of the precursor E1b1a (M2) and the Bantu population that is responsible for its dissemination. It has a frequency peak (15-45%) in a belt through Sub-Saharan and Equatorial Africa. Modest amounts have been detected in the Arabian Peninsula (3-6%). It is also represented by the high frequency of its descendants, e.g. subclade E1b1a7a (U174) in African Americans. E1b1a8. U175
The E1b1a8 (U175) subclade is an abundant branch in African American populations. Outside of its descendants, E1b1a8a1 (U290) and E1b1a8a1a (U181), the paragroup E1b1a8 accounts for ~8.5% of African American Y-chromosomes. With these descendants, this branch encompasses >23% of African American Y-chromosomes. It has yet to be studied or reported outside of this population. Check this site regularly for updates on this subclade as new information will be posted as studies become available
[/blockquote][/blockquote]

From The Study that I have Posted :
[blockquote]
Sub-populations within the major European and African derived haplogroups R1b3 and E3a are differentiated by previously phylogenetically undefined Y-SNPs.

[/blockquote]
Afro-americans Y-DNA: Bantuid sub-saharan and European ancestory

http://s1.zetaboards.com/anthroscape/to ... 227/1/#new

[blockquote]Sub-populations within haplogroups R1b3 and E3a
Hum Mutat. 2006 Dec 8;28(1):97


Sub-populations within the major European and African derived haplogroups R1b3 and E3a are differentiated by previously phylogenetically undefined Y-SNPs.
Sims LM, Garvey D, Ballantyne J.

Single nucleotide polymorphisms on the Y chromosome (Y-SNPs) have been widely used in the study of human migration patterns and evolution. Potential forensic applications of Y-SNPs include their use in predicting the ethnogeographic origin of the donor of a crime scene sample, or exclusion of suspects of sexual assaults (the evidence of which often comprises male/female mixtures and may involve multiple perpetrators), paternity testing, and identification of non- and half-siblings. In this study, we used a population of 118 African- and 125 European-Americans to evaluate 12 previously phylogenetically undefined Y-SNPs for their ability to further differentiate individuals who belong to the major African (E3a)- and European (R1b3, I)-derived haplogroups. Ten of these markers define seven new sub-clades (equivalent to E3a7a, E3a8, E3a8a, E3a8a1, R1b3h, R1b3i, and R1b3i1 using the Y Chromosome Consortium nomenclature) within haplogroups E and R. Interestingly, during the course of this study we evaluated M222, a sub-R1b3 marker rarely used, and found that this sub-haplogroup in effect defines the Y-STR Irish Modal Haplotype (IMH). The new bi-allelic markers described here are expected to find application in human evolutionary studies and forensic genetics.
[/blockquote]

[blockquote]Conclusion :

Afro-americans didn't have any of E-M35 or E*E3b /J's ,and V88 :
afro-americans are mainly :

E3a7a, E3a8, E3a8a, E3a8a1, R1b3h, R1b3i, and R1b3i1

around 60% of afro-americans belong to E Haplogroup wich is only PN2 by his sub-glades with some E2a Lineage's that are senogabian by origins No doubt about it and around 22% to 25% are R1b-M269 of Irish/scandinavian origins . the rest are Mullatoes !! End of story [/blockquote]

http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2006/12/su ... -r1b3.html

Ps: u r reported for ur Insults, petit chimpanzé vas te crever à ta complexité sale singe !

NTIyMzV9K3szNTcxNTE_.jpg
Arabs And East African Sub-Saharan Ancestory

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