Voice

Voice

sks
sks

May 24th, 2008, 1:00 am #1

Finding a quality voice teacher in our area is very hard. And the supposed "best" in our area seem to have their students sing nice, sweet soprano songs. A local college theatre director had told us not to take youngster to this person as she felt that our youngster had a bigger voice and should be directed to someone who works with broadway type songs. Any input on this? Should an eleven year old be made to sing soprano if it is more of a "bigger" voice.

We also were told that there are some voice teachers in New York/New Jersey lessons that can do periodic private lessons in the summer or that do summer workshops. Does anyone know about this? Any recommendations?
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sks
sks

May 24th, 2008, 1:30 am #2

This would be for Musical Theatre.
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Julie Stevens
Julie Stevens

May 24th, 2008, 5:42 am #3

Finding a quality voice teacher in our area is very hard. And the supposed "best" in our area seem to have their students sing nice, sweet soprano songs. A local college theatre director had told us not to take youngster to this person as she felt that our youngster had a bigger voice and should be directed to someone who works with broadway type songs. Any input on this? Should an eleven year old be made to sing soprano if it is more of a "bigger" voice.

We also were told that there are some voice teachers in New York/New Jersey lessons that can do periodic private lessons in the summer or that do summer workshops. Does anyone know about this? Any recommendations?
I would not recommend studying opera unless your child enjoys singing classical music. Where do you live? I've heard good things about a voice teacher in PA, one in NJ and a few in NYC. Feel free to email me and we can chat about it.

Julie
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CindyS
CindyS

May 24th, 2008, 12:15 pm #4

I totally disagree with your comment about not studying opera unless a student is interesting in classical music. As a music teacher myself and the mother of a daughter who is pursuing a double major in vocal performance AND musical theater, I can honestly say that classical technique is the basis for all singing, especially at a young age.

Many musical theater performers excel at both genres of music, but it is the classical technique that is vitally important, much the same way that classical ballet is vital for any dancer.

I respect all of your views, Julie, and know you are coming from a long background in this business, but on this point, I really have to say I don't agree.

God bless.
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Julie Stevens
Julie Stevens

May 24th, 2008, 7:40 pm #5

That's fine if we have a difference of opinion. I just feel like the way one is instructed to pronounce words and the shape of the mouth when singing certain notes is very different in opera than in musical theatre. Any and all vocal training is recommended, but I feel like opera should wait until age 16 or so, when the voice is a bit more developed and/or the student has an interest in that style of music. Just my opinion, though.

Julie
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Broadway Fan
Broadway Fan

May 24th, 2008, 8:00 pm #6

I agree with Julie. MOST performers who are classically trained in Opera etc. might not be able to find work in alot of musicals. Sure they are great at singing, but if they learn that style of singing from a young age they may find it hard to sing any other way. And trust me I do not want to listen to Good Morning Baltimore from Hairspray or Suddenly Seymour from Little Shop performed by Opera singer. Some performers can do both well, but most will find it difficult.

Just my opinon though.
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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

May 24th, 2008, 8:08 pm #7

Finding a quality voice teacher in our area is very hard. And the supposed "best" in our area seem to have their students sing nice, sweet soprano songs. A local college theatre director had told us not to take youngster to this person as she felt that our youngster had a bigger voice and should be directed to someone who works with broadway type songs. Any input on this? Should an eleven year old be made to sing soprano if it is more of a "bigger" voice.

We also were told that there are some voice teachers in New York/New Jersey lessons that can do periodic private lessons in the summer or that do summer workshops. Does anyone know about this? Any recommendations?
I know I have posted a post like this in the past, but I thought it might be interesting to some of the new posters.

When I was in music teaching college in the late '60s, the conventional wisdom was that kids should not be given voice lessons until they reached puberty. And so, when I was teaching elementary school chorus after that, mothers would come to me and ask about voice lessons for their daughters, and I would dutifully tell them to wait a couple more years and then do it, when their lungs would be more fully developed.

In the late '70s, Annie changed all that. Now kids have voice lessons much earlier in life and everyone is OK with it, as long as the RIGHT teacher is obtained, one who understands how to correctly work with a young voice.

Charles Strouse once told me that when they first began auditioning girls for Annie, very few of them could hit the high notes necessary. As the years went on, then all of the auditionees that came in could do it, having been listening to and singing along to the OBC album since they were 3.



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CindyS
CindyS

May 25th, 2008, 10:28 am #8

That's fine if we have a difference of opinion. I just feel like the way one is instructed to pronounce words and the shape of the mouth when singing certain notes is very different in opera than in musical theatre. Any and all vocal training is recommended, but I feel like opera should wait until age 16 or so, when the voice is a bit more developed and/or the student has an interest in that style of music. Just my opinion, though.

Julie
I agree that true opera study should wait until a student is older. I was referring to actual legit styles and classical technique from an early age and only because it's important for any style. For instance, vowels are more important in classical technique than musical theater; therefore, if a singer desires to continue classical style, rather than mt, they will have trouble with the vowels.

Again, like you say, it's just a difference of opinion, and any student needs to work with the teacher they feel is suiting their needs. The original poster should seek out the teacher/coach they feel will give them want they want.

Thanks, though, for not blasting me. God bless.
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