kel
kel

November 2nd, 2008, 1:59 am #11

Leapin' Lizards — "It's a Hard Knock Life" these days. So professional nurses, Donna Gaffney and Carol Roye, strongly believing that "The Sun'll Come Out Tomorrow" with the election of Barack Obama, have produced a rallying call to help get out the vote. And they chose the perfect song to convey the message: Somebody's Gotta Do Somethin' by Tony Award winners Charles Strouse (Annie, Bye Bye Birdie, Applause) and Martin Charnin (Annie, The First) from the famed composer's and lyricist's musical Annie Warbucks.

So Gaffney, whose daughter originated the title role in Annie Warbucks in Chicago in 1992 and sang "Somebody's Gotta Do Somethin'," called Charnin and Strouse for permission to use their song. Giving their go-ahead, Martin Charnin offered to rewrite the lyrics.

The result turned into an all-out effort by a team of 20 people. Broadway regulars, including Frank Ventura who recruited the singers and pianist and David "DibS" Shackney who was the sound engineer, recorded the newly rewritten song. Donna and Carol produced an accompanying video. And did Lauren do the vocals? Nope- she was editing the video with Hess Keenan.

"Somebody's Gotta Do Somethin'"can be downloaded onto ipods (the mp3 is available by emailing 2nurses4change@gmail.com). The YouTube link is below.

Check it out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7teWoQXPTrs

So, download the song, put on your sneakers and go knock on those doors!!!

GO OBAMA-BIDEN!!!
Donna and Carol

Donna A. Gaffney, APRN, BC, DNSc, FAAN

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value=" name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
Charnin may have given his approval, but creator Harold Gray certainly would not have. Gray was a staunch Republican and Little Orphan Annie as his comic strip was his daily platform for his politicial philosophy for all the decades that the strip ran. I recall reading that he detested FDR and his government programs so much that he killed off Daddy Warbucks in the comic strip when FDR was elected for a third term in the 40's. (Of course, Daddy came back miraculously!) The Annie strips from the 1930's are wonderful reading by the way, especially the ones from the late 20's through the early 30's. I think in the 1970's when the musical first came out, there was quite a bit of write up in the reviews questioning the part of Annie and Warbucks feeding the New Deal to FDR and how Gray would have rolled over in his grave.

By the way, anybody realize that the Tennessee Valley Authority was actually signed in May of 1933, but in the show, Annie gives FDR the idea in spring of 1934. Ah well - who said it was supposed to be historically accurate.
Quote
Share

Meghan
Meghan

November 2nd, 2008, 6:09 am #12

I did realize that! I wrote a paper last year on history in various forms of media like film, television, fiction etc. in AP United States History, and Annie and its historical background was one of the things i talked about. Since i've done the show annie warkbucks, and there is a lot more political history in that one, i focused a lot on Annie warbucks, especially the white house scenes, as well as the pattersons. It was interesting to research.
Quote
Share

Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

November 2nd, 2008, 12:37 pm #13

Charnin may have given his approval, but creator Harold Gray certainly would not have. Gray was a staunch Republican and Little Orphan Annie as his comic strip was his daily platform for his politicial philosophy for all the decades that the strip ran. I recall reading that he detested FDR and his government programs so much that he killed off Daddy Warbucks in the comic strip when FDR was elected for a third term in the 40's. (Of course, Daddy came back miraculously!) The Annie strips from the 1930's are wonderful reading by the way, especially the ones from the late 20's through the early 30's. I think in the 1970's when the musical first came out, there was quite a bit of write up in the reviews questioning the part of Annie and Warbucks feeding the New Deal to FDR and how Gray would have rolled over in his grave.

By the way, anybody realize that the Tennessee Valley Authority was actually signed in May of 1933, but in the show, Annie gives FDR the idea in spring of 1934. Ah well - who said it was supposed to be historically accurate.
In Annie Warbucks Commissioner Doyle comes up to the Warbucks Mansion to discuss women for Mr. Warbucks to date, and her assistant Mrs. Kelly arrives with some more files of eligible women. When Mrs. Kelly is getting ready to leave and go back to Commissioner Doyle's office, it is pouring rain, so Mr. Warbucks offers her a dollar for cab fare. The date this happens is Friday, February 9, 1934.

Speaking of historical accuracy on February 9, 1934 it was 15 degrees below zero, the coldest temperature ever reached in New York City. Must have been an awfully cold rain.
Quote
Share

kel
kel

November 2nd, 2008, 4:43 pm #14

Must have missed it in the show - how do we know it's Feb 9?

Also, I wonder why they changed the name from Stark to Doyle at one point. In the Pantages preview, she's Comm. Stark.
Quote
Share

Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

November 2nd, 2008, 11:09 pm #15

I researched the information about the dates in Annie Warbucks myself, using the dates indicated in the Playbill as my first clues and then using what is said in the script. I published my findings in our newsletter, Annie People, in the January 1996 issue, #76.

Note: Back in 1934, New York's weather readings were taken at Battery Park. They were also taken at Central Park, but the Battery ones were the official ones. Around 1961 the city decided to use the Central Park readings as the official ones. That is why if you look it up today, the record low for New York is 15 below, because that's what it was at Central Park the same day the Battery showed 14 below. But the Warbucks Mansion was closer to Central Park than the Battery anyway.

Here is my article that I did in early 1996:

THE COLD RAIN IN ANNIE WARBUCKS

Trying to speculate on the "exact" dates, as far as I could determine, of the chronology of events in Annie Warbucks proved to be an interesting task, and by the time I had finished, I'd discovered something rather interesting about the Warbucks Mansion at 987 Fifth Avenue in New York.

Obviously, the first scene of AW begins on Monday, December 25, 1933, since it is Christmas Day. The date of the next scene is unable to be determined from there, so instead I worked on Act II first. The script says that the scene with Annie at the Pattersons' was on a Monday in early April 1934. Let us assume that it is the first Monday in the month, April 2. In Tennessee it very likely would be warm enough in early April for C.G. to be barefoot outside. The next day, April 3, was the White House scene, and the party on the Staten Island Ferry was the following Saturday, or April 7. The script states the party was on a "balmy" Saturday evening. According to New York weather statistics at Battery Park (back then the readings were taken there; now they are taken at Central Park and the airports), the high temperature for April 7 was 49 degrees; that up front doesn't sound too balmy, but when we realize that 1933-1934 was overall the coldest winter in New York City history with rare below zero readings occurring several times, we can suppose that 49 must have felt "balmy" to New Yorkers. (If they had held the party two days later on April 9, it would have been 68 degrees!) The show concludes on Wednesday, April 11, 1934 with the wedding at the Waldorf (a nice 53 that day).

Let us now work backward from the first scene in the second act, April 2. The script states that this is 6 weeks after the previous scene, which took place on a Thursday. Counting back 6 weeks from April 2 and then back to the previous Thursday, we find that the scene where Oliver Warbucks is meeting Commissioner Doyle at her office to sign the papers is Thursday, February 15. Since this scene was "the following Thursday," the most logical date on which the previous scene could have happened was Friday, February 9. This was when Drake and the Servants sing "That's The Kind Of Woman" and Warbucks sings "A Younger Man." Before the songs are sung, Commissioner Doyle is at the Mansion suggesting some more women for Warbucks to go out with, and as she is leaving, she reminds Warbucks that there are "34 days" left before the deadline for his marriage is up. It is here we run into a slight problem with the dates: That would make February 9 the 26th day since the 60 days began, making it so that the 60 days did not officially begin until Monday, January 15. In order to make the stated April date at the beginning of Act II fit, we have to assume that the Commissioner took three weeks after Christmas to draw up the necessary papers (which Warbucks did not sign until February 15 anyway). Of course, the 60th day, whenever it was, turned out to be irrelevant, since the whole thing was put on hold while Annie was missing, and she wasn't reunited with "Daddy" Warbucks until Tuesday, April 13.

The Orphanage scene, which happened "a month" before February 9, took place on or about January 9. Since it took place on a "chilly, wintry day," the 9th would be possible, since the low temperature that day was 36 degrees, and as any New Yorker knows, with the wind whipping around the buildings, it could feel a lot colder than 36. January 10 had a low of 32 and January 11 had one of 29, making them also possible dates for this scene. Of course, since Warbucks was about to take Mrs. Whittleby to lunch, the temperature might have been a little higher by that time in the day but still plenty wintry.

Incidentally, Annie's first week at the Mansion was interesting, weatherwise. 1933 had a rather warm Christmas that year, topping out at 54 degrees. Five days later, on December 30, a very sudden and severe cold wave dropped New Yorkers down to 6 below zero, one of the (20th) century's coldest readings. But then the next day, December 31, it was back up to 42 degrees.

The most interesting scene though, as relates to the chronology of Annie Warbucks, was the day at the Mansion when Commissioner Doyle was talking about additional eligible women for Warbucks to date. Mrs. Kelly arrived, bringing some more files up from the office, and the Commissioner told her to take a bus back or walk, but Warbucks took pity on her and gave her a dollar for a taxi. From Mrs. Kelly's point of view, it was very generous of Warbucks to make that offer, because, as we have deduced above, this scene took place on the 9th of February. There was no way Warbucks was going to allow the Commissioner to make a human being walk through New York or stand at a bus stop on that particular day! For, you see, this was no ordinary day.

It happened that Friday, February 9, 1934 was the coldest day ever recorded in New York City, with the temperature getting down to an astonishing 14 degrees below zero at 7:15 that morning at Battery Park! No day since then has even begun to approach that incredible record low in New York which very likely will never be broken. Even during the day of February 9 the mercury climbed up to only 8 above, which means in the morning when this scene was taking place, the temperature was very likely still way below the zero mark.

But wait! Warbucks told Mrs. Kelly he was going to give her a dollar because it was "pouring" rain. Rain? On the coldest day of all-time?? Hmmm.... To record a low temperature record of such magnitude, there couldn't have been a cloud within miles of New York. But who knows? Maybe it was raining ONLY around good o1' 987 Fifth Avenue but nowhere else in the city! The script does say the scene took place on a "rainy winter's morning in February." In any event, next time you watch that scene in Annie Warbucks, be happy for Annie and Sandy and "Daddy" and everyone else who was inside, because outside it must have been a very cold rain....

Quote
Share

kel
kel

November 3rd, 2008, 4:08 pm #16

I'm stunned. That is amazing research! :D
Quote
Share

Joined: June 3rd, 2003, 6:48 pm

November 3rd, 2008, 7:06 pm #17

nmi
Quote
Like
Share

middleagedfan!
middleagedfan!

November 3rd, 2008, 11:04 pm #18

That is so great to hear "Something" about Lauren Gaffney! She was great in "Annie Warbucks" and I've always been curious what she has been doing. Thanks for the update. I would absolutely love it if she recorded something...anything...anything at all!
I thought Lauren was great, too. This is a really good song!
Quote
Share

middleagedfan!
middleagedfan!

November 3rd, 2008, 11:05 pm #19

Charnin may have given his approval, but creator Harold Gray certainly would not have. Gray was a staunch Republican and Little Orphan Annie as his comic strip was his daily platform for his politicial philosophy for all the decades that the strip ran. I recall reading that he detested FDR and his government programs so much that he killed off Daddy Warbucks in the comic strip when FDR was elected for a third term in the 40's. (Of course, Daddy came back miraculously!) The Annie strips from the 1930's are wonderful reading by the way, especially the ones from the late 20's through the early 30's. I think in the 1970's when the musical first came out, there was quite a bit of write up in the reviews questioning the part of Annie and Warbucks feeding the New Deal to FDR and how Gray would have rolled over in his grave.

By the way, anybody realize that the Tennessee Valley Authority was actually signed in May of 1933, but in the show, Annie gives FDR the idea in spring of 1934. Ah well - who said it was supposed to be historically accurate.
Great post
Quote
Share

kel
kel

November 4th, 2008, 9:02 pm #20

Really, if you are unfamiliar with the strips, they are really amazing. I just finished reading Little Orphan Annie in the Great Depression with my kids. They absolutely loved it (Warbucks loses his fortune, goes blind, etc., etc). It's all the strips from January 1931 until September of that year. I also have a small collection of late 1920's and 30's Orphan Annie books which are basically reprints of the strips in hardcover small books.

Just good readin'
Quote
Share