Jessie
Jessie

January 14th, 2009, 10:18 pm #21

That's absolutely horrible! I'm shocked that anyone would make comments like that! The article also says:

The seven (6+Annie) little orphans, always counted-on to be the joy of the story, here, were sloppy in their production numbersin need of additional rehearsals (and some younger casting). The one exception, being the littlest munchkina 9-year old Sydney Richardson (as DUFFY) who is a delight to watch!

What a terrible review! And Duffy isn't even the youngest! Is this site even credible?
Just in case you were wondering, Sydney as Duffy looked barely an inch taller thatn Mackenzie as Molly, Sydney did the "Molly dancing" in Smile, so I think that is where the reviewer is getting that from. Sydney was fantastic as Duffy. And absolutely adorable in Smile when she tapped.
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Alice
Alice

January 14th, 2009, 10:58 pm #22

The problem is that illness comes with the territory, especially on a non-union tour crammed with one or two night stops. That's something that the parents really need to think about before agreeing to or even auditioning for a tour like this. And it's just a fact that some people will like a show and actors and others will not. Making excuses for the bad show reviews won't change them, so just let it go. I happen to love Annie, but think that the producers seem to be milking this tour. Kids or not, you are right, the show must go on. I also agree with the poster that said regional theaters will have an easier time getting rights to Annie once it stops touring. I'm more satisfied with a professionally done regional production than a tired tour and I'm sure others would be too.
And of course we should ignore the good reviews, since only bad reviews are correct, right?

Calling the tour "tired" certainly doesn't do justice to energetic young cast, currently getting standing ovations at most shows. And quite good reviews at many of their stops.

It's not about excuses but more about knowing what the heck you are talking about.


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anon
anon

January 14th, 2009, 11:27 pm #23

Okay, here's the thing. This thread has gone a bit out of control. I agree with much of what the other poster wrote and correct me if I read the wrong post, but it wasn't said that only bad reviews are right. If you read it, it simply said some people will like shows and some people won't. That is the truth. The fact is there really is no right or wrong and everybody is entitled to their opinion whether anybody else likes it or not. You must be connected with the current tour or reviews and people's comments in general wouldn't be a sensitive issue. And that's fine. BUt as far as knowing what they're talking about, well I can say that if you add up all the people on this forum, Annie has probably been seen/performed in/directed, etc. hundreds of times if not more. It will almost always get a standing ovation, it's Annie. That still doesn't mean everybody loved it or it was the best show they ever saw. So what. If they love touring, then it shouldn't change the experience for your kids whether critics love the show or hate it.
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Natalie
Natalie

January 15th, 2009, 1:16 am #24

I agree with your last statement. A standing ovation means nothing. I don't think I've ever been to a Broadway show that didn't end in a standing ovation. We get standing ovations at the end of every one of my school shows. I don't know if this is a growing trend or if it's always been this way, but it doesn't always mean that the audience thought the show was spectacular. It's more of a courtesy thing in my experiences.
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Kim Ryan
Kim Ryan

January 15th, 2009, 4:50 am #25

Thought I'd share some personal insight on reviews and Annie. After opening in Seattle to some pretty good reviews we made our trip to San Fransisco. We had what all of us thought was a very good opening night even though the theater was half full. The reviews that came out afterward tore the show apart. Every one! Two weeks after, we opened in LA. We were the hottest ticket in town! Great press, stars coming back stage each night, great parties. Yes this was the same show, just a different crowd.

Some time later, John took some time off while we played East Lansing. I got to play Warbucks for the entire week. I was looking forward to now only playing the role, but hopefully getting some good reviews for my scrapbook and web site. Well East Lansing only had one paper and one reviewer. In his review he didn't even mention me, he mentioned John. He said something like 'while the understudies for John Schuck and Mackenzie Phillips (who had left the show 2 weeks earlier) did an admiral job, blah, blah blah, star power'. I was ticked. That afternoon before the show I went to a restaurant next to the hotel for a pre-show meal. The bartender asked "weren't you in the Annie I just saw?". I said "yes, did you enjoy the show?" He said "I did. I wrote the a review, did you see it?" The Bartender handed me the paper with the fore mentioned review. I smiled and told him I hadn't read it and proceeded to read it once more. Shortly thereafter he brought me my soup. I said "thank you" and began eating. I left the restaurant with his 15% tip and didn't mention his review to him. After all, he didn't mention me. The point is, I put to much stock into what a reviewer might think of my performance. A reviewer may hate the show, be attached to an actor he saw once and no one could measure up, seen countless productions (always a problem with Annie), just broke up with his/her partner, or is a hopeful bartender taking a journalism class. A couple of bad reviews is not the end of the world. I've seen great actors get them and bad actors get great ones.
BTW, please go to easyvocalwarmups.com and order the vocal warm-up CD. Yes, I know it's a shameless plug but I've seen some wonderful results with young singers using it. If you enter the discount code ANNIEORPHANS you get a $2.00 discount.
Thanks, David
just to set the record straight about San Francisco:

"The orphans are as adorable as ever in this production, with tiny, self-assured Lindsay Ryan a knockout of precocious musical comedy song, dance and mimetic skills."

-The San Francisco Chronicle, Sept 5, 2005



"The orphans Lindsay Ryan (the most adorable of all as Molly), Brittany Portman, Molly Ryan, Taylor Bright, Casey Whyland and Stevani Alise Weaver pull their comic and musical weight and do wonders with Liza Gennaro's choreography (based on her father, Peter Gennaro's, original musical staging)."

- The Oakland Tribune, September 3, 2005



.....sorry, I couldn't help myself! These kids (with the help of their parents helping to haul them all across this country) earned each and every one of these positive reviews! But, again, I do COMPLETELY agree with everything else you said!!
-Kim
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Suzanne
Suzanne

January 15th, 2009, 6:33 am #26

I agree with your last statement. A standing ovation means nothing. I don't think I've ever been to a Broadway show that didn't end in a standing ovation. We get standing ovations at the end of every one of my school shows. I don't know if this is a growing trend or if it's always been this way, but it doesn't always mean that the audience thought the show was spectacular. It's more of a courtesy thing in my experiences.
I would have to disagree with the statement that said "standing ovation means nothing" and that it always happens. I've been to many a Broaedway show that has not received them, as well as many national tours that I felt deserved them that only a small handful of people stood for... the same goes for high school productions. I believe that the stading o's are earned - and the more the audience likes the show, they reward the performers. That is just my humble opinion.
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Natalie
Natalie

January 15th, 2009, 10:09 pm #27

I don't know...maybe it's just my recent experiences. Or maybe I've just been picking the right Broadway shows! :D At my school at least, pretty much every show gets a standing ovation. We're a really small technical high school. Our talent is good, but not at the level of bigger more performing based schools. I think in that case it's more of a respect thing. But then, like I said, that's just in my experiences.
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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

January 15th, 2009, 11:31 pm #28

From what I remember over the years seeing dozens of Annie shows, I think every one I ever saw got a standing ovation, including lots of community theater productions, no matter how good or bad they were. All that was needed was a bunch of cheering Orphan mothers to get an audience to its feet.

The only show I can remember that didn't get a standing O was the first preview of "Annie 2: Miss Hannigan's Revenge" in Washington in December 1989, which Tricia Trozzi and I covered for our "Annie People" newsletter. However, we HAD to stand up at the conclusion of the three and a half hour show in the second or third row because the two people sitting next to us did so. They were Annie's mom and dad, so naturally we had to follow suit. There we were, four people in an audience of 2,000, standing up all by ourselves with everyone looking at us.
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ILuvAnnie2
ILuvAnnie2

January 16th, 2009, 1:26 am #29

I second that. I've never been to an Annie production that did not get a standing ovation, and believe me they're not all deserving!
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melinda
melinda

February 14th, 2009, 6:01 am #30

What a horrible thing to say about a little girl! That reviewer should be ashamed! Calling a little girl fat?! O my goodness thismakes me so angry. I would like to say though, that Madison is a FANTASTIC Annie and it makes me so sad that the press is saying such negative things about her. Does anyone have an email address contact for her or or family? I would really like to send her an email telling her how great I thought she was. Hopefully she hasnt read any of these reviews but I would still like to le her know what an incredible job i thought she did in the role. Julie, I know you coached with her. If i wrote her an email could i send it to you and you could forward it?
I saw the show at the kodak in LA and sadly, it's true. Everyone is the audience was saying/thinking the same thing. She was wrongly cast in this part which isn't fair to her or to the folks who shelled out $65 a ticket to see the show. She didn't look the part, could not sing dance or act. She was awful. Sorry, but the truth is the truth.
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