Life Behind the Curtain

KellyTx
KellyTx

July 19th, 2008, 5:06 pm #1

http://youtube.com/watch?v=149HAEsdXyQ

featuring Marissa O'Donnell, Matthew Gumley, Dylan Riley Snyder, Marlon Sherman, Devynn Pedell and Alex Scheitinger
Quote
Share

Denver
Denver

July 19th, 2008, 11:40 pm #2

Thanks for posting, really enjoyed listening to each of the kids. All sounded very positive regarding their various stage managers.
Quote
Share

old fan
old fan

July 20th, 2008, 12:41 am #3

...the kids did seem so professional, but still young at heart. What are in the "notes" they referred to ? I know it's constructive criticism of mistakes from each show, but what type of errors would that include ?
Quote
Share

KellyTx
KellyTx

July 20th, 2008, 12:54 am #4

Notes are things you get after a show. It may not be every show, but it's just constructive criticism. It could be anything from reminding an actor to do something on stage, to notes on how a song is sung... I'm not sure if that makes sense. Maybe someone here would be able to explain it better.
Quote
Share

Elizabeth
Elizabeth

July 20th, 2008, 2:32 am #5

I think it's what Kelly said plus things like telling an actor where/how to stand if he/she wasn't visible to everyone in the audience, telling actors to pronounce words more clearly, doing something different with a funny line if the audience didn't seem to get a joke, or maybe telling someone he/she wasn't with the rest of the group in a dance number, etc...
Quote
Share

K
K

July 20th, 2008, 5:31 am #6

But it's the Child Wrangler's job to make sure the child actors on Broadway are doing what they are supposed to be doing... I mean the Stage Managers are the bosses but really that is the wranglers job...
Quote
Share

Jessica
Jessica

July 20th, 2008, 5:55 am #7

Wranglers are in charge of the kids before they step onstage and after they step off. They make sure they make the right entrances, but they have nothing to do with what the kids to onstage.

SMs do NOT give actors notes on their performances (acting choices, dance steps ect) unless the director/choreographer/dance captain is talking through them. They do give notes on technical things, like missed entrances, messed up blocking, not finding their light- stuff like that.
Quote
Share

K-the-O ;-)
K-the-O ;-)

July 20th, 2008, 1:24 pm #8

I was the stage manager for a regional production in Boston. It's A LOT of work. I had to know all the cues e.g. curtain, lights, props, entrances, etc. as well as make sure the actors were ready for their entrance (sometimes they'd be changing and I'd have to hurry them up). I was in constant communication with the rest of the crew via a headset.

If the director or assistant weren't available, I'd give the notes.

I was responsible for having all the props ready, either onstage or off, at the beginning of the show and removing them at the end of each performance.

I scheduled rehearsals and gave feedback to the director if I thought an actor wasn't doing as told.

Marissa and the dark-haired boy said it best, without the stage manager there wouldn't be a show!

It was exciting, scary and very draining. I had never done this type of work when I was hired so 'scary' should top the list of what it was like for me

OF: if you reread Shelly's (self-congraluting) biography she talks about receiving notes after the show. I think one of the notes she received was to stop swinging her legs at the end of Act I when she is sitting at the desk writing to the orphans and singing "Maybe".
Quote
Share

Dina
Dina

July 20th, 2008, 3:37 pm #9

Hi K the O-

Did you really find her book "self-congratulating"? I didn't pick that up when I read it. Just curious what you meant or how you were picking that up.
Quote
Share

K-the-O ;-)
K-the-O ;-)

July 20th, 2008, 4:31 pm #10

LOL

I don't know. I just felt like the book was all about, "I'm such a trouper" & "Look at me, I took that constructive criticism so well" & "I'm just like Annie because I perform even when I'm so tired". There was just something...obnoxious about her that turned me off. And I'm not at all referring to her battle with leukemia should someone get the wrong impression.

I was also bothered by the way she weasled into the Goodspeed production. "Oh, la-dee-da, I'm just going to visit my friend, Andrea, because I have a broken arm and can't work but if I hang around long enough and act cute for the director and sing the songs while casually walking around the theater maybe I'll get cast".

BARF.
Quote
Share