old fan
old fan

9:24 PM - May 07, 2008 #11

I dont mean this post to be rude, so hopefully it wont be taken that way. I just wanted to say that placing a comma after "you" would actually be incorrect grammer. The way it is written is actually correct. It didnt strike me as funny, but i suppose it could be read that way.

happy wednesday!

Meghan
...so I won't hesitate to point out that grammar is spelled like this. A comma after "you" and another after "your child" would be would correct and clearer to the reader. Meghan !!!!!
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Julie Smith
Julie Smith

11:09 PM - May 07, 2008 #12

My undergraduate degree is actually in English, and I believe that old fan's comma placement is correct. I think a ruling from Jon Merrill is in order. He's who I turn to when my brain can't keep up with my writing.

My college years were a few moons ago, so I'm not going to try to recall the rules, but I believe the sentence can stand with or without the extra commas.

Contractions of two words, however, always require apostrophes. "Dont" is not a word.

There seems to be a lot of animosity or some need to put people down around here lately. What's going on folks?
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Zaneeta
Zaneeta

11:11 PM - May 07, 2008 #13

No, I'm afraid to say a comma would not be correct. Commas may be used: 1)If listing or 2)If you have two independent clauses. The comma would not make sense there, although it might help the reader, even though it is grammatically incorrect.
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old fan
old fan

11:29 PM - May 07, 2008 #14

Yes, it is correct.( My BA is also in English and History,before I studied for a second degree and got my RN and Bachelor of Science of Nursing ) Actually, it is a stylistic choice; with or without the commas, the sentence is grammatically sound, but the commas would cut the confusion over whom was being addressed, the parent or the child. Now this has got to be the silliest thread, but as
I am a contributor, so be it !
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old fan
old fan

11:50 PM - May 07, 2008 #15

My undergraduate degree is actually in English, and I believe that old fan's comma placement is correct. I think a ruling from Jon Merrill is in order. He's who I turn to when my brain can't keep up with my writing.

My college years were a few moons ago, so I'm not going to try to recall the rules, but I believe the sentence can stand with or without the extra commas.

Contractions of two words, however, always require apostrophes. "Dont" is not a word.

There seems to be a lot of animosity or some need to put people down around here lately. What's going on folks?
I know what you mean, Julie, about people putting others down over a difference of opinion. We have lost a few good people over this, on this board. Sometimes it's hard to take with a grain of salt
when people are nasty or just plain rude. Luckily, I think this is generally a supportive "community" and have seen people jump to defend others at times.
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Meghan
Meghan

12:07 AM - May 08, 2008 #16

...so I won't hesitate to point out that grammar is spelled like this. A comma after "you" and another after "your child" would be would correct and clearer to the reader. Meghan !!!!!
ugggh......no one can say anything here without getting attacked! As i said, i wasnt trying to be offensive, it was a joke! jeez... However, it still would be incorrect to place a comma after you. For example, you would not write Meghan, and Old Fan are posters on the forum. You would write Meghan and Old Fan are posters on the forum. I dont see the need for clarification.
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Meghan
Meghan

12:09 AM - May 08, 2008 #17

I know what you mean, Julie, about people putting others down over a difference of opinion. We have lost a few good people over this, on this board. Sometimes it's hard to take with a grain of salt
when people are nasty or just plain rude. Luckily, I think this is generally a supportive "community" and have seen people jump to defend others at times.
I am sorry, and i generally try to stay out of things like this, but Old Fan, you are the one who was offensive and putting people (me) down in the first place.
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old fan
old fan

12:15 AM - May 08, 2008 #18

ugggh......no one can say anything here without getting attacked! As i said, i wasnt trying to be offensive, it was a joke! jeez... However, it still would be incorrect to place a comma after you. For example, you would not write Meghan, and Old Fan are posters on the forum. You would write Meghan and Old Fan are posters on the forum. I dont see the need for clarification.
...Meghan, and Old Fan, are posters on this forum. BOTH are correct. This one gives more emphasis. I know you didn't mean to be rude, Meghan, and I have always ( up to now, lol) enjoyed your posts and perspective. I think I complimented you on your maturity once ! But ,I did think the earlier post was disrespectful, IMO.
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Dictionary
Dictionary

1:00 AM - May 08, 2008 #19

I am sorry, and i generally try to stay out of things like this, but Old Fan, you are the one who was offensive and putting people (me) down in the first place.
Who's: contraction of who is

Whose: belonging to which person(?)
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Noel
Noel

2:01 AM - May 08, 2008 #20

This struck me as rather amusing, of course I could have also read it wrong:

"If you or your child is currently in the 4th Grade, and going into the 5th Grade this fall (2008-9 school year)"

How many 4th Graders have their own child?
Grammatically correct or not I just thought it was funny. I didn't make my post to be mean or put anyone down.
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