another Alicia Morton TV movie

old fan
old fan

September 24th, 2008, 12:38 am #1

...on right now ! It's called Miracle Run (2004) about autistic twins, one who develops a crush on Jennifer, Alicia's character. I didn't realize Alicia had done so much TV work...I caught her in Odd Girl Out a while back and she's done others.
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ILuvAnnie2
ILuvAnnie2

September 27th, 2008, 11:48 pm #2

I'm probably in the minority but I liked her version of the Annie movie, better than the Aileen Quinn one.
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Suzanne
Suzanne

September 28th, 2008, 1:18 am #3

I like the fact that it stuck closer to Broadway show than the original film did. Although, what was up with the corn ... why corn instead of the apple? I have always wondered that LOL.

Suzanne
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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

September 28th, 2008, 1:47 am #4

I thought having Annie jump out of character and steal the corn was a dreadful scripting error; I don't think Annie would ever steal anything from a street vendor. The same goes for Warbucks hitting someone in the back with a snowball! That bit was just plain dumb. Those were just two of dozens of examples of terrible scripting and bad directing that caused me to give the Disney movie such a low rating.

On the other hand, except for a couple of stupid, unnecessary lines that should have been taken out in the editing process (e.g., "I'll bring everybody presents!"; "Hang ME in the bathroom?"), I found the 1982 movie nearly flawless. It may not have been that close to the play, but it sure was close to the comic strip, which is how the producer wanted it.
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annielaurie
annielaurie

September 28th, 2008, 3:46 am #5

Jon, how did you feel about the 1982 movie paying tribute to old Hollywood rather than Broadway/Radio City Music Hall/NYC? Since I am a fan of old Hollywood I rather enjoyed it and I liked the song "Let's Go to the Movies". I always wondered why John Huston took the movie in that direction. Why he chose "Camille"(did I get the title right?) as opposed to any other movie of the era. Did it have some significance to the director? Don't get me wrong, I love "NYC" and the tribute to NYC in the play, but I also liked the changes made in the 1982 movie. I did think the segment taken from "Camilla" was a bit too long and I don't quite understand the message, if there was one, that the scene was supposed to communicate to the characters in the movie or us, the audience. Just my two cents. But I've never quite understood the criticism of the movie. I thought it was very well done. Jon, since you know Aileen Quinn personally, do you happen to know how she reacted to the negative reviews of the film? Do you know how anyone associated with the film reacted to the reviews? Did Martin Charnin like the film version? Just curious. I can appreciated missing some songs and scenes, but I loved the movie just the same and enjoyed the new song and scenes. Both the play and the movie are forever in my heart and I can fully appreciate both. As always, thank you for your comments and for sharing so much of your time and expertise on this forum!!
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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

September 28th, 2008, 5:27 pm #6

Camille was chosen to be part of the Annie movie because the supervising film editor of Annie, Margaret Booth (1898-2002), had also been a film editor of Camille back in 1937.

Margaret Booth edited many films and lived to age 104, having lived in three different centuries.
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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

September 28th, 2008, 7:52 pm #7

Jon, how did you feel about the 1982 movie paying tribute to old Hollywood rather than Broadway/Radio City Music Hall/NYC? Since I am a fan of old Hollywood I rather enjoyed it and I liked the song "Let's Go to the Movies". I always wondered why John Huston took the movie in that direction. Why he chose "Camille"(did I get the title right?) as opposed to any other movie of the era. Did it have some significance to the director? Don't get me wrong, I love "NYC" and the tribute to NYC in the play, but I also liked the changes made in the 1982 movie. I did think the segment taken from "Camilla" was a bit too long and I don't quite understand the message, if there was one, that the scene was supposed to communicate to the characters in the movie or us, the audience. Just my two cents. But I've never quite understood the criticism of the movie. I thought it was very well done. Jon, since you know Aileen Quinn personally, do you happen to know how she reacted to the negative reviews of the film? Do you know how anyone associated with the film reacted to the reviews? Did Martin Charnin like the film version? Just curious. I can appreciated missing some songs and scenes, but I loved the movie just the same and enjoyed the new song and scenes. Both the play and the movie are forever in my heart and I can fully appreciate both. As always, thank you for your comments and for sharing so much of your time and expertise on this forum!!
I think the whole idea of the movie "saluting" Hollywood was the idea of the producer, Ray Stark, not John Huston. Ray Stark and company bought the rights from Martin for $9.5 million and then went with what they wanted to do. I think they wanted to make something "different" from the Broadway show and instead make it more like the Little Orphan Annie comic strip, the whole thing Martin was trying to get AWAY from.

I have met Aileen on several occasions, most recently about ten years ago, but we always seemed to be talking about her current project(s) at the time rather than rehashing ancient history. The reviews on the movie certainly weren't all negative, but most of the people who didn't like it were people who were expecting it to be just like the play, which it wasn't intended to be. The movie was done in the style of 1965, when movie musicals were among the most popular films, but by 1982, the culture was different, and so was the movie-going public. Everything by then was space and sci-fi. It was not hard to imagine why "E.T." steamrollered over Annie in that summer and killed its popularity. Annie was a great movie done at the wrong time.

Martin hated the way the movie was done, and so did the kids who were currently doing the play. Martin had to caution them not to badmouth the movie in public, even though they didn't like it. Eventually, the movie began to eat into the play's business, and this is one reason the Broadway show closing was announced at the end of October 1982.

Martin talks at length about all this in the interview Tricia Trozzi did with him in 1986 for our newsletter Annie People. Check out his interview on my Web site:

http://members.aol.com/jonmerrill/charnin.htm

I was fortunate in that when I saw the movie for the first time, I had seen the play only once, and that was eight months before, so I went into it with no preconceived notions about what I thought it should be. Those fans who had been following the show since 1977 felt otherwise.





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VelmaKelly
VelmaKelly

September 29th, 2008, 1:42 am #8

I thought having Annie jump out of character and steal the corn was a dreadful scripting error; I don't think Annie would ever steal anything from a street vendor. The same goes for Warbucks hitting someone in the back with a snowball! That bit was just plain dumb. Those were just two of dozens of examples of terrible scripting and bad directing that caused me to give the Disney movie such a low rating.

On the other hand, except for a couple of stupid, unnecessary lines that should have been taken out in the editing process (e.g., "I'll bring everybody presents!"; "Hang ME in the bathroom?"), I found the 1982 movie nearly flawless. It may not have been that close to the play, but it sure was close to the comic strip, which is how the producer wanted it.
Annie does lie to the apple vendor in the stage production. She asks if he'll donate an apple to the orphans picnic and when he agrees and says, "When is the orphan picnic?" she replies, "As soon as I take a bite". Sounds like stealing to me

I think if you're hungry you'll steal, and that was the point, whether it was corn or an apple doesn't matter.


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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

September 29th, 2008, 2:40 am #9

You're right about the apple bit in the play; I remember reacting badly to the corn bit in the Disney movie, thinking it was mean-spirited of Annie to swipe the corn in a sneaky way. I didn't have that problem with the Orphans' Picnic line, inasmuch as she did ask, and the apple seller admitted that no one was buying them anyway.

In the 1986 National, Annie once said, "Would you like to donate an Orphan to the apples' picnic?"

I really don't remember much about the Disney movie, since I watched it only once or twice, which was painful, but I wanted to take notes for the blog on my Web site as to what I thought was wrong with it:

http://members.aol.com/jonmerrill/disneyannie.htm

It certainly wasn't the WORST movie ever made, just disappointing, because after the perfection of the Lindsay Lohan "Parent Trap" remake by Disney the year before (and I'm speaking as one of the greatest Hayley Mills fans ever when I was a teenager), I was expecting something of much higher quality. As I mention in my blog, the Disney people threw that thing together in a hurry just to make a fast buck. Where is Walt now that we really need him?

By the way, absolutely the worst movie ever made in the entire history of cinema was one called "Watership Down" from the late 1970s. And "Ripe" with Broadway's Daisy Eagan ("The Secret Garden") in the '90s wasn't far behind.



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annielaurie
annielaurie

September 29th, 2008, 4:04 am #10

As always, Jon, thank you for your wonderful posts and insights. I enjoyed the linked articles. Regarding Annie's personality, after listening to the Annie Warbucks cast recording countless times I can't help but notice a significant change in Annie's personality from Annie to Annie Warbucks. "You better leave me be, Lady, before I give you a punch in the nose . . .", I can't imagine Annie addressing an adult like that in the original Annie. Do you have any thoughts or opinions on the personality changes in the character of Annie in Annie Warbucks. I'd love to hear/read what you have to say.
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