Annie performed by local theaters

ren
ren

5:00 PM - Jul 31, 2008 #1

My daughter auditioned for a community theaters production of Annie a few months ago. She was told that same day that she would be getting a callback for an orphan role, only to find out that the theater did not get the rights to the show since the National tour was playing 2 hours away.

Now another community theater has said they will be doing Annie in June and has set auditions in APril. However, the tour will be coming even closer to this theater (an hour away) in late May.

How does a theater go about getting rights for the show?
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Julie Stevens
Julie Stevens

5:31 PM - Jul 31, 2008 #2

They apply for the rights through the licensing company, MTI (Music Theatre International). Some theatres make the mistake of holding auditions before they hear back from the licensing company. In some cases, rights have been pulled during rehearsals, which is awful for the cast.

Julie
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RLS
RLS

5:40 PM - Jul 31, 2008 #3

My daughter auditioned for a community theaters production of Annie a few months ago. She was told that same day that she would be getting a callback for an orphan role, only to find out that the theater did not get the rights to the show since the National tour was playing 2 hours away.

Now another community theater has said they will be doing Annie in June and has set auditions in APril. However, the tour will be coming even closer to this theater (an hour away) in late May.

How does a theater go about getting rights for the show?
I am not really sure how theaters really get the rights or what determines things like distance. Well, I know a little I guess from talking to people that run theater companies, but not the technical terms or anything. So sorry if I am not phrasing this correctly...

I know that there are different things that go in to it. When you buy the rights you can just buy the general rights that allow you to perform a show. However, there rae more extensive rights (from what I understand) that you can but that would cancel out any contracts to put on the show within a certain mile radius. This happened to a friend of mine who runs a theater. He had bought the rights to a show that would have been a regional premier and got right up to a few weeks before it opened and another theater bought this type of rights and they were no longer able to perform the show.

I am pretty sure that the national tour has this kind of rights, that no other theaters can run Annie within a certain mile radius. But, please don't take my absolute word for that. The reason I think that is because last year there was some discussion about other theaters having to cancel thier production becausethe tour was coming too close.

Also, my daughter was in a local production of Annie this past Christmas. They did auditions last September and we found out at the cast party in December that they almost didn't get the rights because the show was coming nearby (2 hours away). The rights were not aquired until AFTER the auditions and the show was already cast. They even had a back-up show in place, just in case.

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mom
mom

6:33 PM - Jul 31, 2008 #4

My daughter auditioned for a community theaters production of Annie a few months ago. She was told that same day that she would be getting a callback for an orphan role, only to find out that the theater did not get the rights to the show since the National tour was playing 2 hours away.

Now another community theater has said they will be doing Annie in June and has set auditions in APril. However, the tour will be coming even closer to this theater (an hour away) in late May.

How does a theater go about getting rights for the show?
Hey--I am actually on the board of a local (CINCINNATI) young performers community theater. We applied for the Annie rights and were turned down for the same reasons but MTI did say we could do Annie JR so that is what we are doing next FALL. Dosent make much sense but we grabbed the JR before they changed their minds and before any other theater group wanted it. The only downer to the Jr is there is no orchestra score.
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Julie Stevens
Julie Stevens

9:57 PM - Jul 31, 2008 #5

I am not really sure how theaters really get the rights or what determines things like distance. Well, I know a little I guess from talking to people that run theater companies, but not the technical terms or anything. So sorry if I am not phrasing this correctly...

I know that there are different things that go in to it. When you buy the rights you can just buy the general rights that allow you to perform a show. However, there rae more extensive rights (from what I understand) that you can but that would cancel out any contracts to put on the show within a certain mile radius. This happened to a friend of mine who runs a theater. He had bought the rights to a show that would have been a regional premier and got right up to a few weeks before it opened and another theater bought this type of rights and they were no longer able to perform the show.

I am pretty sure that the national tour has this kind of rights, that no other theaters can run Annie within a certain mile radius. But, please don't take my absolute word for that. The reason I think that is because last year there was some discussion about other theaters having to cancel thier production becausethe tour was coming too close.

Also, my daughter was in a local production of Annie this past Christmas. They did auditions last September and we found out at the cast party in December that they almost didn't get the rights because the show was coming nearby (2 hours away). The rights were not aquired until AFTER the auditions and the show was already cast. They even had a back-up show in place, just in case.
Yes, MTI has different categories when applying for rights to the show. Will it be for profit, will it be done in a church, school, dinner theatre, etc...They also want to know the size of the theatre, ticket prices, and whether or not it is professional (Union) or amateur. This information helps them to determine how much to charge you for the rights. When Networks licensed the show for a professional National Tour, they were able to make demands in their contract so that local theatre around the country would not be taking away their business.

Julie
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RLS
RLS

10:14 PM - Jul 31, 2008 #6

During the first 2 years of the last tour, it played at a theater literally 1/2 mile from the door of the theater where my daughter did Annie this past Christmas. I think that was part of the hold up... I just think they were not sure if the tour would be returning there last year. When it was determined the tour would NOT return to the town, they did give the rights.

Not sure why though, as it was always a 2-nighter anyhow the last few years and one of the new cast members LIVED in that town this time around... I bet they would have made a KILLING there this time if they had actually done it.
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leapinlizards
leapinlizards

1:25 AM - Aug 20, 2008 #7

Hey--I am actually on the board of a local (CINCINNATI) young performers community theater. We applied for the Annie rights and were turned down for the same reasons but MTI did say we could do Annie JR so that is what we are doing next FALL. Dosent make much sense but we grabbed the JR before they changed their minds and before any other theater group wanted it. The only downer to the Jr is there is no orchestra score.
I wanted to respond to this message, because several years ago I had my own children's theatre comapny, and I indeed had the rights already purchased to do "Annie, jr.", and I had some angy parent (of course it was one who didn't get the role of "Annie", and was wanting to make waves), - well, she called and tried to find a reason to get us kicked out of our performance space. Well, she almost succeeded, because when she was looking into it, from what I understand, she only found those listed rights under "ANNIE" and didn't look under "ANNIE JR."... so, it was a mess, but I held the rights in my "right" hand. lol. :0) -

Anyhow, my point is that they may have had the right to "Annie, JR." and not "Annie". It's pretty much the same show, minus the orchestra, and everyone in it has to be under 18 unless there is a special claue with MTI (Music Theatre International - which, we ended up having to do because our Miss Hannigan got Pneumonina, so I took over the role literally with moments notice. But I had to fax info back and forth to approve it with MTI.)

hope this helps some.


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