Tony
Tony

March 4th, 2008, 8:48 am #11

Charles Strouse actually comments on the key of Tomorrow on one of the special features on Life After Tomorrow. And he says that very few girls could belt high Fs with out going into head voice. Julie, did you ever find that you had vocal issues because of all that high belting as a kid?
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Tony
Tony

March 4th, 2008, 8:52 am #12

Hi I think that they should have two Annie ..so it give them a break.. so they do not get sick ..

Is Amanda still going to play Annie and stay on tour to the end.. i like her lot and I like looking at picture and reading what people write on her guest book to..


Ps
can people talk to who dose audition and ask if they can two Annie and understudy so no one gets sick thanks
I've always thought that in productions that do 8 show weeks that there should be a matinee Annie like in Miss Saigon, Evita and Jekyll and Hyde. Also, touring is sooooooo straining on a person. Anyone who sings can tell you that the worst thing for a voice is lack of sleep and rest and it's hard to get fully rested and recover when you are in a different city almost every night.
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Joined: March 6th, 2006, 9:12 pm

March 4th, 2008, 3:57 pm #13

Charles Strouse actually comments on the key of Tomorrow on one of the special features on Life After Tomorrow. And he says that very few girls could belt high Fs with out going into head voice. Julie, did you ever find that you had vocal issues because of all that high belting as a kid?
Why did he pick that high key for Tomorrow? (It was lowered for the first movie, and I think also for the second, not sure.) And why the high Fs in Hard Knock Life? (Also lowered in the movie...)
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Joined: June 3rd, 2003, 6:48 pm

March 4th, 2008, 4:30 pm #14

I think I remember reading, here maybe, that Charles Strouse had found out how high little girls could sing and wrote HKL even higher so they would sound really angry, but maybe I'm inventing this...
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Julie Stevens
Julie Stevens

March 4th, 2008, 4:42 pm #15

Charles Strouse actually comments on the key of Tomorrow on one of the special features on Life After Tomorrow. And he says that very few girls could belt high Fs with out going into head voice. Julie, did you ever find that you had vocal issues because of all that high belting as a kid?
No, I never had vocal issues as a kid. I was taught very early how to breathe properly and support my voice.

Julie
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Dina
Dina

March 4th, 2008, 6:49 pm #16

Julie, to your knowledge, were most of the Annies from the original run (B'Way and tours) professionally trained singers? I have to say that I feel very badly for what Amanda is going through, but I can't say that I am at all surprised. I was kind of concerned something like this would happen.
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Vickie
Vickie

March 4th, 2008, 7:29 pm #17

I saw Patricia Ann Patts in the LA production near the end of her run. She must have been really sick, because she was straining terribly, sang from the back of her throat (like her throat was really sore) and completely dropped all her high notes. I was surprised, because I'd seen her on numerous TV shows and she was awesome.

I was only 14, but I remembered thinking that her understudy should have gone on.
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Julie Stevens
Julie Stevens

March 4th, 2008, 8:13 pm #18

Julie, to your knowledge, were most of the Annies from the original run (B'Way and tours) professionally trained singers? I have to say that I feel very badly for what Amanda is going through, but I can't say that I am at all surprised. I was kind of concerned something like this would happen.
Several of the girls who played Annie during the original run had vocal problems. Most children are not trained well and hurt their voices by screaming and not supporting their voices when they sing. That's why it is so important for the kids on tour to study voice and warm up before the performances. Improper singing can result in voice loss and damage to the vocal cords.

Julie
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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

March 4th, 2008, 10:29 pm #19

I think I remember reading, here maybe, that Charles Strouse had found out how high little girls could sing and wrote HKL even higher so they would sound really angry, but maybe I'm inventing this...
In the play Tomorrow is in G flat (6 flats). In the movie Tomorrow (Cabinet scene) is in E flat (3 flats.)

In the play Hard-Knock Life is in B (5 sharps) but modulates towards the end of the song so that it ends in B flat (2 flats). In the movie HKL is in G (1 sharp).

Charles Strouse must have enjoyed composing on the black keys!

I have heard several community directors say that their first cut was for those who could not sing the high F sharp in HKL without screaming.

I was impressed in the Special Features of LAT that every one of the women nailed the F sharp in HKL. Who knows how many of them had done relatively little singing in the past few years, but it didn't matter; they were able to still do it anyway, just as they had done 25-30 years ago.

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Dina
Dina

March 5th, 2008, 2:46 am #20

Several of the girls who played Annie during the original run had vocal problems. Most children are not trained well and hurt their voices by screaming and not supporting their voices when they sing. That's why it is so important for the kids on tour to study voice and warm up before the performances. Improper singing can result in voice loss and damage to the vocal cords.

Julie
I have read that some of the cast members of SPRING AWAKENING love this stuff and keep it in their dressing rooms along with kettles.

http://www.tealand.com/ThroatCoat.asp
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