Am I overlooking something?

Am I overlooking something?

K-the-O ;-)
K-the-O ;-)

April 10th, 2008, 11:29 pm #1

Okay, so Annie runs away in the early morning. When she reaches Hooverville one of the guys asks what she is doing out, alone, so late at night. So, we know she has wandered the streets all day/night.

After 'We'd Like to Thank You' the cops come, grab Annie, and take her back to the orphanage. In the original script the next scene opens with Hannigan marching the kids back into the orphanage from their walk and "fresh air for the month".

I'm guessing Hannigan wouldn't take the kids out in the middle of the night. Therefore, do the cops hold Annie somewhere until morning before returning her? Because then Grace comes along to take Annie, after the police officer leaves, and I don't think Grace would appear at the orphanage late at night.

Or, are we not supposed to notice such things and just go along with the fact it must be daytime again?
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middleAgedFan!
middleAgedFan!

April 11th, 2008, 7:28 am #2

I think that we're not supposed to notice those things. Nicely noted, though!
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K-the-O ;-)
K-the-O ;-)

April 11th, 2008, 2:54 pm #3

I was impressed with myself But then I thought there might be a logical explanation.

It is interesting, though, isn't it??
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Julie Stevens
Julie Stevens

April 11th, 2008, 6:06 pm #4

Okay, so Annie runs away in the early morning. When she reaches Hooverville one of the guys asks what she is doing out, alone, so late at night. So, we know she has wandered the streets all day/night.

After 'We'd Like to Thank You' the cops come, grab Annie, and take her back to the orphanage. In the original script the next scene opens with Hannigan marching the kids back into the orphanage from their walk and "fresh air for the month".

I'm guessing Hannigan wouldn't take the kids out in the middle of the night. Therefore, do the cops hold Annie somewhere until morning before returning her? Because then Grace comes along to take Annie, after the police officer leaves, and I don't think Grace would appear at the orphanage late at night.

Or, are we not supposed to notice such things and just go along with the fact it must be daytime again?
Perhaps it took all night for the police to figure out where to return Annie. Maybe she was being close-lipped about it, since she didn't want to go back. Or maybe the cops chased her most of the night, until they caught her.

Julie
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K-the-O ;-)
K-the-O ;-)

April 11th, 2008, 6:27 pm #5

Yeah, I figured either they held her or chased her all night. But I like your explanation that she refuses to tell them where she lives. Those police officers don't seem THAT invested in catching her so I can't picture them chasing her all night.

And maybe, once at the police station, another officer recognizes her and they figure out she lives at the orphanage because she has run away before.

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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

April 11th, 2008, 10:01 pm #6

Okay, so Annie runs away in the early morning. When she reaches Hooverville one of the guys asks what she is doing out, alone, so late at night. So, we know she has wandered the streets all day/night.

After 'We'd Like to Thank You' the cops come, grab Annie, and take her back to the orphanage. In the original script the next scene opens with Hannigan marching the kids back into the orphanage from their walk and "fresh air for the month".

I'm guessing Hannigan wouldn't take the kids out in the middle of the night. Therefore, do the cops hold Annie somewhere until morning before returning her? Because then Grace comes along to take Annie, after the police officer leaves, and I don't think Grace would appear at the orphanage late at night.

Or, are we not supposed to notice such things and just go along with the fact it must be daytime again?
...involving trying to put "real time" ideas correctly into the plot as K-the-O has pointed out involving Annie's running away from the Orphanage and then being brought back. Very interesting! Something for Annie fans to think about.

Here's another one:

Supposedly, there is an extra day in December 1933 before Christmas that had nothing happen and was skipped according to the dates for the plot indicated in the Playbill, and I have never been able to satisfactorily work out a plausible solution. Anybody ever try to work out a timeline that fits for the events in the script?

And there are others:

"a mayor five foot two" was sung in December 1933 in "NYC." Mayor LaGuardia was still Mayor-Elect LaGuardia until he was sworn in on January 1, 1934, the traditional New Year's Day date for all New York mayors to begin their terms.

In the movie, Annie and Grace sing about Shirley Temple in the song "Let's Go To The Movies." Was Shirley Temple already popular by June 1933 when that song was sung?

The same with Rin-Tin-Tin. Was the famous dog popular in June 1933 when Annie has the exchange with a spectator near the dogcatcher wagon when she is trying to prove that Sandy is her dog?

Another well-known one is that the movie "Camille," which Annie and Warbucks saw in June 1933 at Radio City Music Hall LONG before anyone else in the USA did. The rest of the country did not see the film for the first time until its release date four years later in 1937!

My very favorite of these "speculations" is in "Annie Warbucks": The day Mr. Warbucks comes to Commissioner Doyle's office and gives Mrs. Kelly a dollar for a taxi "because it's raining" was figured out to be Friday, February 9, 1934. Earlier that morning on that day was the coldest temperature ever recorded in New York City at Battery Park (where readings were done back then; now they are done at Central Park). The historic record low reading at Battery Park was an incredible 14 degrees below zero. By mid morning it was still probably below the zero mark (the high for the day was 8 degrees above zero in the afternoon), but for Commissioner Doyle that was still a VERY cold rain she had that taxi ride in!



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K-the-O ;-)
K-the-O ;-)

April 11th, 2008, 11:35 pm #7

Hi John,

You wrote:
"Supposedly, there is an extra day in December 1933 before Christmas that had nothing happen and was skipped according to the dates for the plot indicated in the Playbill, and I have never been able to satisfactorily work out a plausible solution. Anybody ever try to work out a timeline that fits for the events in the script?"

Can you explain this again (for my pee-sized brain)? Do you mean in real life there is an extra day in December that isn't accounted for in the script? Or do you mean, according the events in the script, there is a day missing and therefore the authors messed up their own timeline?

I guess either would would work LOL but my dyslexic brain is just getting confuzzled

It is fun to do this, isn't it? You can get too wrapped up in it, though. For a day or so last month I was convinced it was still only Xmas Eve when the Mudges show up for the check and Annie. I had to keep going back and rethinking it because I KNEW a mistake like that couldn't be made in a Bway show.
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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

April 11th, 2008, 11:53 pm #8

Years ago my co-editor on Annie People tackled this problem, and I can't remember the details, except that she tried to match up each day in the script with a day in real life leading up to Xmas and found that there was a real-life day in December 1933 that did not jibe with the Annie plot and essentially was "extra."

Look at a Playbill at the December dates and try to match up each "day" in the script and see if all the real days are accounted for.

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Jon Merrill
Jon Merrill

April 12th, 2008, 4:52 am #9

...involving trying to put "real time" ideas correctly into the plot as K-the-O has pointed out involving Annie's running away from the Orphanage and then being brought back. Very interesting! Something for Annie fans to think about.

Here's another one:

Supposedly, there is an extra day in December 1933 before Christmas that had nothing happen and was skipped according to the dates for the plot indicated in the Playbill, and I have never been able to satisfactorily work out a plausible solution. Anybody ever try to work out a timeline that fits for the events in the script?

And there are others:

"a mayor five foot two" was sung in December 1933 in "NYC." Mayor LaGuardia was still Mayor-Elect LaGuardia until he was sworn in on January 1, 1934, the traditional New Year's Day date for all New York mayors to begin their terms.

In the movie, Annie and Grace sing about Shirley Temple in the song "Let's Go To The Movies." Was Shirley Temple already popular by June 1933 when that song was sung?

The same with Rin-Tin-Tin. Was the famous dog popular in June 1933 when Annie has the exchange with a spectator near the dogcatcher wagon when she is trying to prove that Sandy is her dog?

Another well-known one is that the movie "Camille," which Annie and Warbucks saw in June 1933 at Radio City Music Hall LONG before anyone else in the USA did. The rest of the country did not see the film for the first time until its release date four years later in 1937!

My very favorite of these "speculations" is in "Annie Warbucks": The day Mr. Warbucks comes to Commissioner Doyle's office and gives Mrs. Kelly a dollar for a taxi "because it's raining" was figured out to be Friday, February 9, 1934. Earlier that morning on that day was the coldest temperature ever recorded in New York City at Battery Park (where readings were done back then; now they are done at Central Park). The historic record low reading at Battery Park was an incredible 14 degrees below zero. By mid morning it was still probably below the zero mark (the high for the day was 8 degrees above zero in the afternoon), but for Commissioner Doyle that was still a VERY cold rain she had that taxi ride in!


Oops. Of course in my last entry in the last two lines I meant Mrs. Kelly was riding in the taxi in the cold rain, not Commissioner Doyle.
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