On-line Resources

chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

June 23rd, 2011, 2:54 pm #1

Welcome to the On-line Resources thread, part of the links database @ neloo.com!

As noted in this thread's title, this is where we post the links to websites that we feel are "resources". Usually this means that the site has a lot of information about its topic(s).

If you don't care to leave a link, why not check out some of the sites that are listed here?

(As always, replies deemed as spam - typically those selling something or for a business - or replies that are not deemed "resources" will be removed as soon as I see them.)

the links database @ neloo.com
http://www.neloo.com/linkgurl/
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

June 23rd, 2011, 3:00 pm #2

 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Wikipedia - tons of information about tons of topics

http://dictionary.reference.com/
dictionary.com - look up words or check out the word of the day

http://www.archive.org/index.php
the Internet Archive - find past versions of many websites

http://www.urbandictionary.com/
urbandictionary.com - be hip to the cool street lingo ... or whatever 

http://world.altavista.com/
translate text

http://www.youtube.com/
YouTube - watch videos or post your own

http://www.amazon.com/
Amazon.com - sells things but also has product reviews and much more

http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/
TVShowsOnDVD.com - learn when your fave shows will be available

http://www.weather.com/
Weather.com - How's the weather? Find out here.

http://www.google.com/
Google - does anyone *not* know about Google?
 
http://www.webmd.com/
Search for health info or read articles.

http://www.snopes.com/
Before forwarding an "urgent" email, check this site to see if said email has been proven false.
 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/webwise/course/
BBC's guide to using the Internet

http://www.howstuffworks.com/
how stuff works

http://www.webopedia.com/
online dictionary of computer and internet terms

http://visibone.com/
website design info

http://www.lifehacker.com/
A daily blog on how to do anything better -- haggle, pack a suitcase, make a sports drink.

http://www.shopstyle.com/
Don't miss the sale "rack" at the "world's most fabulous" online store. Dirt cheap to high-end. Sign up for e-mail alerts.

http://www.sitejabber.com/
Consumers review online businesses and websites -- most loved, most hated, and most useful. Save money and avoid rip-offs.

http://www.fatwallet.com/
Shop or read others' advice at their forums.
 
more tips for getting things done
http://www.ehow.com/

Read reviews before you buy things.
http://www.epinions.com/

--

some sites about saving money:

http://www.savemoney.com/

http://save.lovetoknow.com/

http://www.couponmom.com/

http://www.eversave.com/
 

--

Job Search
 
http://www.job-hunt.org/

http://www.simplyhired.com/

http://www.indeed.com/

http://www.monster.com/

http://www.careerbuilder.com/
 
--

a few sites about getting organized

http://www.ineedmoretime.com/

http://www.lifeorganizers.com/

http://www.proquo.com/

http://www.organizedclutterbags.com/

http://www.webmd.com/balance/guilde/how ... -organized
 
--

Addresses for opting out of spam:

http://www.optoutprescreen.com/

http://www.donotcall.gov/

http://www.catalogchoice.org/

http://privacy.getnetwise.org/

http://www.dmachoice.org/


--
 
Sites for pet owners and animal lovers:

http://www.dogtrainingbasics.com/

http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care

http://www.mydogiscool.com/

http://www.purina.com/cats/

http://www.aspca.org/
 
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

June 23rd, 2011, 3:03 pm #3

INTERNET SEARCH TIPS

1) If you're looking for a fairly unique term (like spelunking), first try a simple 'Net search.

2) Even with a unique term, chances are you're looking for specific information, so add words to clarify. Certainly, if it's a common term (such as recipes) you'll need to add more words to target your search, such as easy breakfast recipes, lasagna recipes, recipes kids can make.

* Collect terms into quotes to search for phrases, e.g. "how to ski" or "What is spelunking?"
* Many search engines offer a drop-down menu of suggestions as you're typing; if you see one that fits, give it a try. (I sometimes use this to check the spelling of a word, without even having to search!)
* To find the meaning of a word type define: spelunking (use the word you're looking for, of course, instead of spelunking) into the search box.
* When searching for details about a song, I put the title or a specific line from the song in quotes and add the word lyrics: "I can't get no satisfaction" lyrics. This often returns the song name, artist's name, etc. in addition to (multiple, often spam-ridden) links to the song lyrics.

3) Use the advanced search fields to get even more specific: for example, searching for "bodies of water" but excluding results for "oceans". You can further narrow the search by file types, such as PDF, DOC, etc. or by searching only one domain.

4) As you search, if you find a site that you want to remember, make a note of it. Otherwise you might later find yourself trying in vain to recreate the search that led you there in the first place.

5) For shortcuts and more, read the Search Tips offered by whatever search engine you're using.

More search tips are here:
http://hanlib.sou.edu/searchtools/searchtips.html

10 tips for finding information on the Internet
http://www.microsoft.com/athome/moredon ... etips.mspx

--
Tips for using email
http://emailreplies.com/

"Internet Tips and Secrets" - mostly for new webmasters
http://www.internet-tips.net/
 
---
 
Sites about internet safety/security (especially where kids are on-line)

http://www.fraud.org/

http://its.ucsc.edu/security_awareness/intmodtext.php

http://www.wiredsafety.org/

http://www.enough.org/

http://www.protectkids.com/

http://www.netsmartz.org/
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

June 23rd, 2011, 3:53 pm #4

Article: How I would Hack Your Password
http://money.msn.com/identity-theft/how ... words.aspx

Create Strong Passwords
http://www.microsoft.com/security/onlin ... reate.aspx

Password Strength Tester
https://www.microsoft.com/security/pc-s ... =Site_Link

How I Stole Someone's Identity
http://www.scientificamerican.com/artic ... ocial-hack
 
If Your Password Is 123456, Just Make It HackMe
http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home/ar ... love_money

---

There was also a very good article on how people can access your accounts by using the Forgot Your Password link. The article has been removed since I first saw it, but the gist was this: if someone can enter their own email address, and if they know enough about you - or if they can find out certain info on your Facebook page, blog, etc. - they can get your account password reset, and the new password will be sent to them. The bottom line was: be sure that answers to your "security questions" are also kept private and secure!  
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

September 1st, 2012, 1:30 pm #5

Consumer Watch: Door-to-Door Sales Scams
Door-to-door sales may sound remarkably old fashioned in this digital age, but consumer agencies around the country are cautioning consumers about something they're calling a "new scam."
The Better Business Bureau just released a major warning: Be careful of door-to-door salespeople peddling magazine subscriptions. Additionally, the New Hampshire Attorney General's office and many police departments nationwide all want you to be cautious.
Gretchen Kennedy, from Wilmington, Delaware learned the hard way. She was working from home when she heard a knock at the door. She says two young men were on her porch trying to sell her magazine subscriptions. Gretchen tried to tell them "no", but they gave her the hard sell. Finally, after the men said her subscription would help fund charter schools, she gave in and cut them a check. But the magazine never arrived! "It angers me that, that someone would pull the fundraising card," Kennedy says.
The Better Business Bureau warns that is exactly the type of scam they have received more than a thousand complaints about, this year alone!
New Hampshire Attorney General Michael Delaney says the "help a struggling student ploy" is the scammer's most popular approach. "Consumers are warned that sales people coming to their homes may be misrepresenting themselves as neighbors and individuals working to earn money to go to college, when many of these individuals, who are employed by United Circulation, have come from out of state and may not be college students," Delaney says.
The AG cautions, you're flat out wasting your money.
"Consumers are also warned that United Circulation charges subscription fees far in excess of the actual cost of the subscription," states Delaney.
In addition to magazine subscription sales scams, complaints about door-to-door salespeople hocking all kinds of other stuff is also on the rise. The Better Business Bureau receives thousands of complaints each year from consumers who unknowingly fall for scamming solicitors. While many door-to-door salespersons are honest, the BBB says its top complaints are about cosmetics and poor quality photography, even meat that was no good.
The BBB's Paula Fleming warns that deceptive door-to-door sellers are looking to make a quick buck. "Unscrupulous marketers sometimes trick consumers into paying hundreds of dollars for items they don't want or can't afford. Oftentimes, their presentations are so slick that consumers aren't even aware that they have actually made a purchase," she says.
So what should you do if a fast talking, hard selling and seemingly too slick solicitor shows up at your door?
The BBB says:
1. Be safe: Ask for identification before you open the door. Never invite the solicitor into your home.
2. Be wary of high pressure sales tactics: A trustworthy company should let you take time to think about the purchase and compare prices before buying or putting down a deposit.
3. Research the company with BBB: Visit BBB.org to view the company's BBB Business Review to find out more about their marketplace performance. If you have a smart phone, you can download and use the BBB app to access the company's report while the person is standing at your door, or visit m.bbb.org on your mobile device.
4. Get transaction details in writing: Be sure you receive a contract or receipt explaining the details of your purchase and all the terms and conditions that apply.
5. Remember the "Three-Day Cooling-Off Rule": The Federal Trade Commission's Three-Day Cooling-Off Rule gives consumers three days to cancel purchases of more than $25 that are made in their home or at a location that is not the seller's permanent place of business. Along with a receipt, the salesperson should always provide a cancellation form that can be sent to the company to cancel the purchase within three days. By law, the company must give consumers a refund within 10 days of receiving the cancellation notice.
6. Listen carefully and be aware of high-pressure sales tactics: Some unscrupulous door-to-door sellers will put pressure on you to close the deal at that moment, and even make special offers to entice you. Listen to their tone. Are they increasing in volume as they speak to you? Are they ignoring you despite saying you are not interested? Find a way to end the conversation quickly to avoid long, drawn-out sales pitches.
7. Stand strong: If you do allow a salesperson inside and decide during the presentation that you are not interested in making a purchase, simply ask him or her to leave. If the salesperson refuses to leave, threaten to call the police, and follow through if they don't leave immediately.
Remember, if you want more time to ponder a purchase, get the salesperson's card, tell them you want to think about it and you'll call them if you're interested.
source:
http://shine.yahoo.com/wo...les-scams-155000614.html
See also:
http://www.bbb.org/
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

August 30th, 2013, 1:02 pm #6

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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

February 8th, 2015, 8:29 pm #7

The 11 Best Sites to Get a Second Opinion, Onlinehttps://www.yahoo.com/health/the-11-bes ... 39823.html
- * ^ - 
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