HTML resources + Links Sites

chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

June 23rd, 2011, 2:27 pm #1

Welcome to the HTML resources + links sites thread, part of the links database @ neloo.com!

As noted in this thread's title, this is the place to post the link to HTML resources and/or links sites, databases, etc.

Or, if you don't care to leave a link, why not check out some of the sites that are listed here?

(As always, replies deemed as spam - typically those selling something or for a business - will be removed as soon as I see them.)

the links database @ neloo.com
http://www.neloo.com/linkgurl/
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

June 23rd, 2011, 2:37 pm #2

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Free website hosting, website building services, and other website freebies:

http://www.webs.com/

http://www.weebly.com/

http://www.webstarts.com/

http://www.yola.com/

http://www.wikispaces.com/

http://www.110mb.com/

http://www.tripod.lycos.com/

http://www.bravenet.com/

http://www.angelfire.lycos.com/

http://htmlgear.lycos.com/


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HTML How-To

http://www.htmlgoodies.com/

http://www.lissaexplains.com/

http://www.w3schools.com/html/default.asp

http://www.davesite.com/webstation/html/

http://jmarshall.com/easy/html/

 
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Intro to XHTML
http://www.w3schools.com/xhtmL/xhtml_intro.asp

recommended doctypes (with sample blank page format)
http://www.w3.org/QA/2002/04/valid-dtd-list.html

Counters
http://www.sitemeter.com/

http://www.statcounter.com/
 

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CSS, HTML, and XHTML resources

HTMLDog
http://htmldog.com/

the W3 tutorials
http://www.w3schools.com/default.asp

the W3 code Validator
http://validator.w3.org/

list of special characters for HTML
http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/Guide/Advanced.html

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Scripts
http://nms-cgi.sourceforge.net/scripts.shtml
 
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favicon generators/editors

http://tools.dynamicdrive.com/favicon/

http://favicon-generator.org/

Generate favicons using text and color:
http://antifavicon.com/
 
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The Art of Distinction in Web Design
http://sixrevisions.com/web_design/the- ... eb-design/

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Considering color-blindness in website designs

http://www.disabled-world.com/disabilit ... -chart.php

http://www.allwebdesignresources.com/we ... olorblind/

http://www.andyrutledge.com/styling-text-links.php

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MORE LINKS

Serial TV - links to various TV related shows.
http://www.serialtv.org/
 

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archive47 is a mirror version of 'the links database' with links that are sortable by tags. Check it out for more HTML and other resources:

http://delicious.com/archive47

 
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

June 23rd, 2011, 3:30 pm #3

LINKS

To see what links are currently popular - or if you're trying to alleviate some boredom with a little web surfing - check out the main page of delicious.com.

http://www.delicious.com/

Review the "Fresh Bookmarks" or the "Hotlist" tabs to see the latest in popular links, or "Explore Tags" and find links to what interests you: movies, photography, howto, etc.
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

March 24th, 2012, 1:53 pm #4

Since the previous post, delicious dot com has changed their main page, so there are no Fresh Links. Instead, IMHO, there are now a lot of graphics and very little link content. If you're looking for links/timekillers, you might want to try some random searches instead...
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

May 30th, 2012, 3:12 pm #5

If you're thinking of starting a fan website, here are some ideas for content you could include for your topic:
* EPISODE/MOVIE RECAPS
pros: This type of information is something people search for.
cons: If they're not original to your site, or if you don't have complete information (and added in a timely manner for current topics), you can lose visitors to other sites.
* OTHER FACTS/INFORMATION (QUOTES, TRIVIA, CHARACTER HISTORY)
pros: Again, this type of information is something people search for.
cons: And again, if your site offers incomplete or unoriginal data, visitors will likely look elsewhere.
* REVIEWS
pros: They're original, and they offer a chance to rant/rave about your topic.
cons: Some people prefer facts about a topic rather than another person's opinion.
* FAN FICTION
pros: It's original.
cons: Writing fan fiction is easy; writing good fan fiction is... another story (pun intended). Also, some people won't even try new fics after having seen too much of it done badly.
* FAN ART
pros: It's original.
cons: Graphics can take up a lot of server space. Plus, using other people's photos can be a target for copyright infringement issues.
Basically, when deciding what content to include in your fan website, consider the type of content that *you* look for.
And whatever type of content you choose:
* Make it as original and as complete as possible.
* Present it in an organized way. (Having great content is useless if visitors can't find it!)
* Don't be afraid to start small and then expand as time/interest allows. (Please, no "Coming Soon" or "Under Construction" pages.)
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chezanne
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chezanne
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Joined: July 12th, 2001, 2:03 am

May 30th, 2012, 3:15 pm #6

Another "webmaster tip" is if you don't have time (or HTML skillz) to set up a fan website, collect your data onto a message board or forum.
Lately I've noticed that there are some extremely well-organized message boards that could compete nicely with just about any fan website in terms of content offered. Based on that, some ideas for starting a fan forum include:
* If it's a TV show, have an Episodes section with one thread for each of the episodes. You could start the thread with an episode summary, and then direct viewers to add relevant quotes or comments in the appropriate thread. (Note that i you don't feel like writing episode descriptions of all episodes, start with just those for your favorites eps. Especially if it's a hard-to-find series: I bet someone would love to read it, and something is better than nothing!)
* Don't forget a "general" section to catch those topics that don't fit in a specific episode.
* As the forum grows you can add sections for character info, fanfiction, fanart, etc. - anything that a "normal" website would have.
* A board can be an especially effective form of getting online if there's not a lot of info on the 'Net for your topic. Plus, the more visitors your forum gets, the more people you have to help you add content such as reviews, quotes, trivia, etc.
* One down side of having a forum, though, is that some people will avoid it simply because they've seen too many message boards with only opinions to offer. But if you've got good content, and you can stick with it until your board starts showing up in searches, there's a good chance that people *will* find you - and keep coming back!
And not just for forums, but some general webmaster tips:
* Remember that it'll take quite a bit of work to compile a good selection of content and organize it. Adding a little bit at a time is fine, but if you undertake the project, please stick with it! The 'Net already has far too many unfinished and neglected projects.
* PLEASE don't have light text on a dark page for any thing that requires a lot of reading. Your visitors' eyes will thank you.
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chezanne
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chezanne
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May 31st, 2012, 1:58 pm #7

I feel compelled to share some hints about running a website - as if I'm such an expert.
http://www.rusted-crush.com/webtips.html
A few other ideas that I typically employ when I‘m designing websites:
* Try to make layouts that are browser friendly: test them in various browsers to see how they look.
* To minimize load times - for those not blessed with high-speed connections - I usually keep the size of any one page under 50 kb. (If you're on a free webhost, that will also help keep you from going over your allotted bandwidth.)
* Don't feel as if you need to use every single HTML trick that you know: sometimes less is more.
* I put my CSS on the page itself, instead of in a separate stylesheet, because I’ve seen on other sites that sometimes the stylesheet doesn‘t come in, leaving the page unformatted.
* Beware putting a Last Updated date on the main page. If it was any time prior to today, visitors will get the impression that your site is old.
Please don't think I'm saying that people who don't follow my suggestions are wrong, because that's certainly not true. Websites should express your personal taste, so there's not necessarily a "right" way to do them. I basically try to design pages that I would want to visit: reasonable size, not a lot of clutter, clear navigation, etc.
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As a side note, if you’d like to start a website and are looking for ideas, is there an old, neglected site for your topic that you could take over and build on? Just ask permission first, and be sure to give the first webmaster credit.
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Things I look for when I’m visiting websites:
I noted a few things above, but to be even more specific…
For a fan website dedicated to a certain TV show or movie, the top things I look for are:
* complete information about the subject (that is, for a TV show, all episodes are listed with a summary, or whatever detail they're providing)
* a well-organized layout, so that it's easy to navigate and find what you're looking for - without having to click through many submenus
* original material is a big plus, whether it's a recap or a review
* if it has advertisements, they're kept to a minimum. Certainly, don't expect me to view an ad before I get to access the feature I selected. And no popups!
* don't have sounds or videos that start automatically. If I want to see/hear them, give me an option to select it; don't force it on me.
* it doesn't have to be updated every day, but it's nice if the site doesn't appear to be completely abandoned
* as for types of content I look for, I love original detailed summaries of the movie or TV episodes, top ten lists, quotes...
For a news site or other source of information, one thing that will make me quickly leave the site is if they present their points/list in a slideshow format, with one item per page. More than likely, I was only marginally interested in the first place; I’m certainly not interested enough to click much more than twice to get through the article. (When I see a slideshow, I typically think, with disgust, “Yep, someone’s click-mongering. I‘m out of here!”)
For a personal website, like a blog, the #1 thing I look for is: is the site updated regularly? (It's so frustrating to find a site where the person seems really interesting and then you discover that they last posted nine months ago.)
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[I wrote the below about two years ago, but I'm reposting it here. (Some of the points are repeated above, but just go with it...)]
Complaints About The Internet
Sure the Internet is a plethora of information and entertainment. However, lately some of the sites I visit often have some problems:
Yahoo - keeps displaying those heartbreaking WSPA ads. News flash, Yahoo: while those ads accomplish making me feel bad, they do NOT inspire me to visit this sponsor. If anything, they get me to minimize my visits to YOUR network of sites to avoid seeing them.
thesaurus.com - which I have visited for months without problems, now a) runs sloooooowly and b) gets locked up and "recovered"... but still doesn't work right after the so-called recovery. Guys, please fix this, because it's annoying for me to have to switch to the Chrome browser every time I want to view your page.
Facebook - repeatedly changes their site's features and then automatically sets users' profiles to comply. No, I don't expect them to value our privacy, but I do want them to know we've got their number.
msn.com - I preferred their old blue start page to the new white one
(multiple sites - msn and Yahoo specifically) - I get that it's gotta be tough to post NEW news articles these days, but *please* refrain from posting pseudo-news with titles such as, "Will The Earth Blow Up?" Most readers know that no article can definitively answer such a question - and therefore, it's a waste of time for us to read it. In other words, give it a rest, Chicken Little!
(multiple sites) - I click on a link called the "20 Tips for ____" or "The Top 50 ____" only to find that the list is presented in slideshow form, with 1 item per page. They (really!) expect me to flip through 50 - or even 20 - pages. I'm not nearly that interested, ppl! Very often the next click I make is to leave the slideshow altogether.
(multiple sites) - Similarly, when I see an article that looks mildly interesting, I'm put off to find that the article is spread across three or four more pages. Again, I'm not that interested in it!
(multiple sites - msn and Yahoo specifically) - And, similarly similar, I click on a headline on their main page only to be routed to some video. I know why they do this - hello, they start with an ad - but I want to READ an article, not see a show. Especially if I'm at work with the sound turned off...
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