Kessler cut away valve

Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

September 13th, 2018, 11:59 am #1

Came across this while digging around and figured there might be some interest here. As I recall, got this on my trip to Buffalo and Smith's Lawnmower Shop. Don't think I got it at Smiths but it's certainly possible.
Kessler cut away valve.JPG
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Joined: December 12th, 2008, 2:47 am

September 13th, 2018, 7:18 pm #2

That is interesting. There are definitely some design differences on that one compared to what I just worked on with my Kessler.
The threaded (and removable) front check valve piece sticks out in my mind. Looks like the OD threading on the valve fastened
into matching threading on the pump tube....... maybe the thin-wall pump tube not stout enough if it's threaded?
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Joined: December 13th, 2017, 4:05 pm

September 13th, 2018, 11:40 pm #3

Here’s a photograph of a “one piece” Rochester/Kessler valve like DT’s cutaway.



Here it is disassembled:



No “ball valve” here... just a couple seals - kinda similar to a 101
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Joined: December 13th, 2017, 4:05 pm

September 13th, 2018, 11:49 pm #4

Here’s the only photograph I took while working on a Rochester/Kessler “two piece” valve



The pencil is pointed to the copper washer that separates the two halves.
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Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

September 14th, 2018, 12:02 am #5

The one vs two-piece Kessler valve body is a clear tell that these guys, at least initially, had little idea of how to design a practical airgun. The one-piece valve has a major design error that forced the creation of the two-piece valve body and the copper washers.  

This is spelled out in the Kessler instruction manual where they describe how the gun, after disassembly and reassembly, might need an additional washer in order for the front sight not to be off kilter. The first designer never took into consideration that when two pieces are screwed together, unassembled, and then assembled again will not always line up at the same point, due to part wear. 
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Joined: December 13th, 2017, 4:05 pm

September 14th, 2018, 12:12 am #6

I finally managed to track down and obtain a couple of NOS copper washers for the Rochester/Kessler two piece valve.



Great point of reference when going up to the local hardware store.
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Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

September 14th, 2018, 1:36 am #7

Looking at these "oops" copper rings, the reason for using copper is likely because the soft metal would allow precise rotational positioning of the front sight. Other than for that, there's no other apparent reason for using copper from what I can see.   
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Joined: December 12th, 2008, 2:47 am

September 14th, 2018, 3:09 pm #8

I think copper is intended to also be the seal...... the threads won't do it without something being "on" them. My Kessler valve
threads were merely tight from the valve being screwed together for 70 years, but that alone wouldn't have sealed them. (i.e.- You get
something of a labyrinth seal from the mating threads alone but it isn't enough to be perfect)
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Joined: December 12th, 2008, 2:47 am

September 14th, 2018, 3:45 pm #9

R.Belmont wrote: I finally managed to track down and obtain a couple of NOS copper washers for the Rochester/Kessler two piece valve.



Great point of reference when going up to the local hardware store.
Seriously?  Where in the store did you find them?  I don't need any but would have faced the prospect of having to make some if I hadn't been able to reuse my original. Even with my uber-expensive 
CS Osborne punches they would be a trick to fab because of the small OD to ID difference and soft copper material.....
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Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

September 14th, 2018, 11:13 pm #10

Larry91730 wrote: I think copper is intended to also be the seal...... the threads won't do it without something being "on" them. My Kessler valve
threads were merely tight from the valve being screwed together for 70 years, but that alone wouldn't have sealed them. (i.e.- You get
something of a labyrinth seal from the mating threads alone but it isn't enough to be perfect)
Well, yeah, there needs to be a seal material there, but, copper, the most expensive option, isn't needed for sealing; lead, fiber, hard rubber are all perfectly capable of doing that job.  Usually, Copper is the choice only when there is a good reason for using it.  With Kessler, I point to the instruction manual where the purpose of the copper seals is described as being needed to adjust for an offset sight. Only copper is going to allow a fine tuning of the valve rotation.   
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