Crosman 101 series markings

Joined: 11:48 PM - Mar 13, 2018

6:23 PM - Jul 22, 2018 #1

DT, Or anyone else with information,    This has probably been brought up previously , the numbers and letters stamped on the receivers of these guns are randomly placed ,[ left / right side on top of receiver and sometimes on the front ] . Is there any rhyme or reasoning to this ?  Are they put there identifying when repairs were made, and who did the repairs? I have over 40 of these guns and am just curious as to what these markings represent.
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Joined: 4:46 AM - Jul 22, 2011

10:53 PM - Jul 22, 2018 #2

Yes, this has come up many times. Don't think we're any closer to an answer, today.   Part of the problem is that, as I recall, there is  no consistency in the numbers.

One guess (mine) is that the guns returned to the factory for repair, received the numbers. A gun in for repair at the factory will have issues with that work, especially if it were to be returned again; there could also be an issue with invoicing for the repair work. This is backed up by the fact that some of the guns have no numbers, which is evidence that the guns originally left the factory without any markings. 

There were no repair stations back then. Crosman fully expected that the guns could be serviced by the customers. 
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Joined: 11:48 PM - Mar 13, 2018

1:45 AM - Jul 23, 2018 #3

Thanks DT,   And if that is the case, then some guns were at the factory numerous times and some never were.
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Joined: 4:46 AM - Jul 22, 2011

1:52 AM - Jul 23, 2018 #4

I'm assuming we're right that the guns normally left the factory unmarked. If that ain't true, then this blows up. But, logically, what would be needed for those guns - which left the factory unmarked- to get their marks? The only thing I can think of is repairs.     
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Joined: 4:46 AM - Jul 22, 2011

2:08 AM - Jul 23, 2018 #5

Thinking some more about it. Almost certainly, the people making the repairs and applying the marks are the same two guys who made the guns. There was no factory service department back then. Another thing is that there is a deeply ingrained culture, at least there was, about assignment of responsibility for returns, especially early under-warranty repairs. It's not impossible that the markings are codes for specific repair types and responsibility. If such was the case, it would have been PY Hahn's idea. PY was a fanatic about gaining the most amount of information in the least amount of space. Managers were required to submit weekly/monthly? reports on post cards. If these numbers were repair codes, then it would be possible to track repair types with basically no data reports; instead, just look at the guns, or the log book that tells the next number to use for "design flaw" or "production flaw" 

Remember that Crosman made a major model upgrade circa 1929 with the single shot, so, they were paying attention to what was coming back to the factory.
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Joined: 4:05 PM - Dec 13, 2017

3:59 PM - Jul 23, 2018 #6

Has anyone seen a period 1 without the “repair” markings?
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Joined: 4:46 AM - Jul 22, 2011

9:22 PM - Jul 23, 2018 #7

R.Belmont wrote: Has anyone seen a period 1 without the “repair” markings?
Good point. I've  3 period 1 guns and they all have either one or two markings. One is a long # which looks everything like a serial #, then with the one that has two marks, the second is a short #.

My thinking about these being possibly repair numbers was more directed at the 1930-1941 guns.
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Joined: 11:48 PM - Mar 13, 2018

10:46 PM - Jul 23, 2018 #8

Here are the markings on my guns, if this link will work.   Something I noticed in writing all of these down was there are only a few letters on the guns I have.  I separated them into 3 categories, Period 1, Period 2/3, and 102 / 104 repeaters. With so few letters could this be an initial of the person making repairs? Also the only guns I have that are unmarked are 1949 and CG guns.     Dave

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Joined: 4:46 AM - Jul 22, 2011

11:46 PM - Jul 25, 2018 #9

Here's what I have from my collection. 
Period 1 (1925-1929)
(right side)  (left)
X6394          B7
C8569           -
C5948           -
O4939         *C2

period 2/3 (1930-1949)

V600             D8 (note: this is a circa 1940 model 100 with click less forearm)
-                     -    10984J (on pump lever, 1949 model)

Comments:
Looking all the numbers over together, I'm now reasonably sure that these are serial numbers, at least those on the right side of the receiver. What pushes me in this direction is the 1949 model, because, instead of no numbers, the numbers have now moved to the pump lever. My guess is that the serial number move may have occurred prior to 1949, so, any example with no receiver markings should be checked on the pump lever for markings there.

The letter suffix, looks very much like operator/worker numbers, i.e. who built the gun. More than likely, this would have been to track both production/pay (piecemeal work was still the norm back then) and quality.
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Joined: 4:46 AM - Jul 22, 2011

11:47 PM - Jul 25, 2018 #10

V979
Any chance that this is a model 100?
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