Microaces SE5A and Fokker D.VII kits/build

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Microaces SE5A and Fokker D.VII kits/build

Avi Persaud
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Avi Persaud
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Joined: 13 Oct 2006, 20:58

14 Nov 2016, 22:23 #1

It's getting closer winter (kind of) and like many of you, it's back to tiny indoor building/flying for me!

I ended up picking up two of those microaces kits from the UK that I mentioned in one of the other threads. These kits are somewhat unique as they are multimedia kits you build into very nicely detailed famous aircraft of WW1 which use the popular parkzone motor/gearbox and brick esc/servo/rx systems.

The kits ship flat and what you find inside are flat sheets of aser cut white and printed 1 and 2mm depron, a laser sut and printed plastic sheet for reinforced and find detailed parts and a decal sheet for hiding some of the building work as well as adding some nice details to stock parts like propellers etc, and their site says the decals help with the rigidity of the models too. They also include what looks like a 4mm thick printed plastic (I'm guessing styrene) sheet which can be used as a base for your finished model when displaying it but also served as a stiffener for transporting all that fragile foam and plastic.

The cost of these particular ones are 40GBP which I think converts to about $67CAD, with a recent release of a Bristol F2B, which is a bit bigger than these planes and a bit more detailed going for about 67GBP. Considering the fin factor of the build, the nicely detailed result and what i've read others saying about flying quality, the prices are not too bad if you are sick of seeing the same old parkzone and flyzone stuff at the gym all the time.

If the cost of the parkzone brick is too much for you (about $75+) hobbyking has a slightly smaller clone for about $20!

I have started working on the SE5A first, which is one of their latest releases and a bit more complex that the D.VII, so I will add pics as I progress, but I'm about half done it as we speak.

Instructions don't come with the kit but can be downloaded and printed from their website in PDF form.

I'm using my favourite foam glue here, UHU POR! It's a German foam glue that works both as a contact adhesive as well as a direct application glue. I love this stuff and it was also the recommended glue to do most of the building, luckily you can get it from Hobbyking now as well as Microaces and a few others, I stocked up a few years ago and have a couple of tubes sitting around specifically for foam projects!

But enough of my typing, here are some pics :)



How they come out of the plastic shipping envelope



What you get in the SE5A Kit.



What you get in the D.VII kit.



Building up the fuse.



Fuselage and tail feathers with some nice gun and scope details complete, on to the wings next!
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Avi Persaud
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Avi Persaud
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Joined: 13 Oct 2006, 20:58

17 Nov 2016, 19:55 #2

It's been a few days and I've been busier than usual but I managed to get the lower wing on and I'm working on the undercarriage now.

The kit comes with a nice jig that you build to assist in constructing the wings and attaining the proper 2.5 degree dihedral on each side, of each set of wings.



Best view I could get of the dihedral jig doing its thing. I placed the instruction manual over the wings as they rested on the dihedral to give some weight as the glue dried.



The wings finally married to the fuselage, it's all 1mm foam but it's very sturdy! You can see the way the wing shape is formed in this view.

Next up is the undercarriage!
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InstructorMax
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InstructorMax
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Joined: 13 Oct 2006, 20:04

19 Nov 2016, 22:20 #3

OMG Avi! Those kits are really really cute!!'


What a great way to make use of a wrecked parkzone indoor model. Looking forward to seeing that baby fly in the gym :) :)
RC Test Pilot; Airplane Instructor; Helicopter Instructor
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InstructorMax
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InstructorMax
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19 Nov 2016, 22:23 #4

Fitting the electronics is going to be the real trick. That is what I want to see :)
RC Test Pilot; Airplane Instructor; Helicopter Instructor
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Yammer
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Yammer
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Joined: 27 May 2013, 20:59

21 Nov 2016, 00:45 #5

Wow that amazing. Keep the pictures coming. Can't wait to see them fly :)
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Avi Persaud
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Avi Persaud
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Joined: 13 Oct 2006, 20:58

21 Nov 2016, 16:55 #6

Thanks for the feedback guys :) I'm enjoying the builds and their my first projects in my new dedicated R/C work room since my now wife moved in during the summer and I got rid of the basement tenants so we can make use of the space, so I converted the basement bedroom to my aerodrome :D

Will show some photos of that later as well as my method of storing my planes.

Max I actually test fitted the eflite brick and it fits in really easily! I may opt for the smaller/cheaper hobbyking ones though just to save a few grams as I'm crazy like that!

Anyway I got the landing gear assembled and attached this weekend, which consisted of 6 plastic components, 4 decals and 2 carbon strips, here's the result:



And attached to the plane:



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Avi Persaud
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Avi Persaud
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22 Nov 2016, 15:49 #7



More building last night, got the hinges and control rods installed. Note the dimples on the bottom of the wing plane, these are guides for rigging later.



I was concerned that the UHU glue may cause too much flex and also possibly give way to the dihedral in a crash and I decided to run some Aliphatic glue into the seams which resulted in a firm but still flexible seal along the dihedral root.

In case you don't know what aliphatic glue is, look it up, it's become another best friend on the work bench, it looks like diluted white glue but will glue nearly anything but won't be rigid and brittle like Cyano Acrylic glues (super glue). If used for building wood frames and you try to break the joint, the wood will break first and the joint will be intact! It's high wicking and penetrates pores easily, this stuff went right into the trench between the wings and dried to a clear semigloss seal. If you build plastic models too like I do, it's great for gluing on clear parts without risk of marring/fogging them with super glue or model cement and it's water washable for the first 10 minutes or so till it sets. Got mine at Pinnacle Hobby for about $8!



Upper wing struts, made of single and double layered sections of the printed plastic parts and the inner struts have carbon reinforcing.



Decided to use the aliphatic glue to attach the struts instead of the UHU. Next up, Upper wing and rigging!

On a side note, here's a view of my all new airplane work room now that we cleaned up our basement :D



Lots more storage racks on the left side to store my mess of parts and small quads/helis.

my method of storing the planes is 3/4" PVC pipes and T fixtures mounted to the wall with a couple of C brackets all the way down to the ground to support the weight. I highly recommend using the insulation foam as the weight of the models will create a nice saddle in the foam which will hold them in place until you decide to remove the models. I was able to cut and put it all together in one evening, everything is friction fitted so I can modify heights/arm lengths in the future if I need to.

Closeup:

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Avi Persaud
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Avi Persaud
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23 Nov 2016, 16:14 #8

Not much of a post today but just a fun fact: Yesterday was 100 years since the first flight of the S.E.5!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Aircraft_Factory_S.E.5

The Fokker D.VII however doesn't make it's debut till January 1918, i'm sure I will finish mine well before it's 100th anniversary comes around
:D
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bweaver
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Joined: 20 Oct 2013, 12:24

24 Nov 2016, 02:56 #9

Great build session. Looking good Avi. :D

Bruce
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Avi Persaud
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Avi Persaud
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Joined: 13 Oct 2006, 20:58

25 Nov 2016, 14:14 #10

Thanks Bruce :)

Last night I built the upper wing and left it on the jig to dry to correct dihedral. While that dried, I began rigging the main wing area.

The holes are small and the supplied string will fray easily at the tip after a few passes, you could put it on a needle but then you have to pass the knot you tied through the hole as well, which means you would have to enlarge all the rigging holes.

My Method: dip the tip of the string into some Aliphatic glue and wait about 20 minutes... the glue will dry around the string and seal the frayed filaments together creating a semi flexible needle that you can pass through the holes effortlessly with a pair of tweezers!



Here the rigging is all done for the main wing, I will wait until the upper wing is attached before tightening it. Aliphatic glue will be used on all the holes to keep the string in place once it's all tightened, and I need to make sure that tightening them doesn't warp the wings!

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