Solo Women

Joined: March 7th, 2006, 10:08 pm

August 12th, 2015, 6:19 pm #31

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Go North or northwest. Brent, Kiosk, or west side (1-4) will be much more of what you're accustomed to.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 5th, 2008, 1:26 am

August 12th, 2015, 8:09 pm #32

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Both of your day trips were entirely on access lakes. Canoe-Tea-Smoke are all road accessible with Tea having a car campground, Canoe and Smoke having access point parking and all 3 having cottages. Pog-Whitefish-Rock is pretty similar with all 3 being road accessible, all 3 having campgrounds and at least Rock having cottages. In both cases, no portages were required so I'm not surprised you saw folks taking all the toys. That said, we regularly take chairs on base camp trips - especially in the spring or fall - and while we don't get out in peak blackfly season too often, even Kevin Callan and other canoeing celebrities pack a bug shelter at that time of year.

As Wanda said, if you had started at Rock and gone down to Pen for the day you would have seen a big drop in traffic just getting across that first portage to Pen. From Canoe if you had portaged up to Joe, traffic would have thinned out a bit even though Canoe Lake is probably the busiest access point in the park. When my daughter and I spent a few days camped on Joe mid-week a few years ago, we saw regular traffic every day but our day trip up to Little Doe and Tom Thomson was pretty quiet with no one camped along the Oxtongue River section upstream of Teepee Lake. After leaving Teepee Lake, I think we were up to Little Doe before we saw anyone else that day.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 7th, 2014, 12:12 am

August 16th, 2015, 12:16 am #33

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
There are justified and unjustified fears; rational and irrational fears. Being able to discern the difference can be tricky. For example many fear they are going to be attacked by a bear while camping in the interior. But when you look at the numbers this fear doesn’t bear out. In 2010 there were 355,879 camper nights in Algonquin Park, just under 250,000 were interior camper nights. The number of visitors to the park that same year 830,899; the number of humans eaten, zero. Regardless of whether our fear is irrational and/or unjustified we need to manage it. One thing I’ve found to help is just getting out there. The more you do the sooner you’ll put those fears behind you. If it helps at all I contacted the park to see if they had any statistics in this regard. Here is the their response, “In the absence of having any specific occurrences or reports to support otherwise, I like to think that park visitors are courteous and respectful of each other in the backcountry. Litter and noise remain the top two complaints we receive from backcountry users.” Happy paddling.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 25th, 2014, 1:22 pm

August 16th, 2015, 2:56 am #34

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Rob W hit the nail on the head, BeStrongCarryOn. Your explorations were entirely in the frontcountry. I know, I know -- technically it's the backcountry as soon as you paddle off the access point and any campsite you have to paddle to is a backcountry site. But I still consider Rock, Whitefish, Pog, Canoe, Smoke, Tea etc to be frontcountry lakes because they have road access, leases (cottages, lodges etc), and frontcountry campgrounds. I would not expect them to be any quieter or more pristine than a typical cottage lake in Muskoka.

To get any sort of backcountry feel you need to put a portage or two between yourself and the nearest road access. More is better, but even one makes a world of difference.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 2nd, 2015, 5:32 pm

September 2nd, 2015, 5:36 pm #35

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
I did my first backcountry trip alone the weekend of my 40th birthday (August 22, 2015). It was absolutely PERFECT! My site was only 4km's from the West Entrance of Algonquin (Rain Lake) so I made up for that and did a 40km hike the next day. What a great experience. Trip was too short and cannot wait to do it again!!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 2nd, 2014, 5:50 pm

September 14th, 2015, 7:06 pm #36

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Glad I came across this, as I have been debating trying a solo trip myself. It is very encouraging that, for the most part, everyone has had good experiences. I think my family is more nervous about the idea than me, which is making the trip planning difficult. I think I might try one next spring. I am leaning towards doing it in the spring or fall to avoid the groups of rowdy people.

The August weekends seemed the worst in my experience. But once I was in a portage or two it seems like everyone is much more respectful. Although it was pretty funny watching the expressions of everyone when I got annoyed waiting for my then-boyfriend on a portage into Daisy lake and just picked up the 54 pound 17' canoe on my own and headed across the portage.

I would love to hear more about everyone's first times going solo.
------------------------------
http://adventureboundblog.com/
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 25th, 2014, 1:22 pm

September 17th, 2015, 3:12 pm #37

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Hi Maegan -
If you just "came across this" thread from a search or whatever you may not have noticed, per the announcement on the index page, that about a month ago Algonquin Adventures moved to a new forum hosted by boardhost athttp://algonquinadventures.boardhost.com/index.php . This forum on network54 is being kept online basically to be used as an archive, but members rarely look at it anymore. So if you want to discuss others' soloing experiences or whatever I suggest starting a new thread on the new forum as linked above.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 29th, 2016, 1:58 am

November 29th, 2016, 2:14 am #38

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Re: Solo Women
Quote
Like
Share