Joined: April 9th, 2010, 12:38 pm

August 1st, 2015, 12:18 pm #21

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
"I listened very carefully for any hint that they were getting in canoes to paddle over. If they had, I would have hid in the woods with my pocket knife and paddle. Sounds silly, but they out numbered me and were large."

Pocket knife?

Those dickheads across the lake, drunken or not, would have seen you differently if you had been waving a seriously large knife around while chatting with them earlier. Even a little old lady looks different with one of these suckers.



Crazy behavior also helps... maybe keep repeating "REDRUM" from time to time while making that all-important first impression with morons.

Free at last.
Thank Gawd Almighty, free at last.
Sleep drifting deep.
Deep drifting sleep.
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Joined: August 4th, 2007, 12:00 am

August 1st, 2015, 8:34 pm #22

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Bear spray is assuring.. for the other bears. Its legal too.

I hate camping near anyone. I do watch what goes on around my campsite. That is where I figure the danger is when alcohol fuels idiocy.

Never any problem on the portages.
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Joined: July 29th, 2015, 2:18 am

August 4th, 2015, 6:43 pm #23

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Wow! That is my immediate reaction. Just Wow!

I really appreciate all of these thoughtful responses. I also appreciate that my concerns were taken seriously.
I'm generally not a fearful person - but the idea of alone in the dark with drunken idiots is concerning. I'd add a good filleting knife and bear spray to my kit list.

I have a set of good-quality lightweight compact gear, so, with a lighter canoe, I'm not worried about managing weight at all.

Thanks for the starter route ideas. I hadn't thought of choosing more heavily travelled routes first for the "safety in numbers" thing. I'll be out mid-week, so that should help with the busy factor in those areas a little.

Again, I REALLY appreciate these responses and the enthusiasm. I just have to choose a water-filtration system and a short route and I am good to go!!

Thanks again.
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Joined: August 31st, 2014, 11:44 pm

August 4th, 2015, 9:09 pm #24

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Try a Gravity Works filter system. Very easy to use. I keep it at hand in the canoe and fillmy rreservoir bag with lake water as i paddle to my campsite. Then, while I set up camp I let gravity do the work. By the time my tent is pitched, I have 2 L of water ready to drink
K
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Joined: July 31st, 2015, 9:41 pm

August 4th, 2015, 11:52 pm #25

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Hopefully I'm not quite too late, but starting from rock lake campground, portage to pen lake, then to clydegale, and back the same way Is Very doable indeed. Short portages, lakes not too big, and usually people around incase you would need help.
I am a solo paddler, middle aged, and managed that route just fine. From rock lake to galeairy to pen lake back to rock is great too. One small dam, and one longer 1700 m portage.
I've never been harassed anywhere, and have camped all my life.
Have a great trip
Wanda spruyt
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Joined: June 18th, 2012, 7:46 pm

August 5th, 2015, 2:36 am #26

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
In addition to the fillet knife and the bear spray, consider a small bright Cree-type flashlight with a strobe. Apparently this can disorient someone enough for you to make a getaway without causing permanent damage. Like visual bear spray.

Have a great trip!
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Joined: February 5th, 2012, 12:09 am

August 5th, 2015, 1:13 pm #27

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
I second the bear spray. I've never felt more nervous than the time some loud, boysterous early 20's guys were hootin and hollering near me up on the barron canyon trail, while i had my expensive camera out.

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Joined: July 5th, 2009, 5:55 pm

August 7th, 2015, 7:32 pm #28

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
I'm late to the party on replying to this post, but one thing I would consider would be getting a nice early start on your departure day. I'm usually at the permit office and outfitter for when they unlock their doors in the morning and it's rare that I see another person. We have been on many trips where we're several hours into our trip before we ever see another canoe on the water. This might help you get going in peace without dealing with anyone acting inappropriate in any way, plus there is no better feeling then setting off on a perfectly smooth lake with the mist rising off the water
It's also nice to hit your first couple portages while you're still fresh and not worry about working around other groups as you go by.
We just got back from our 10th family trip into the park and I miss it already.
I hope you have a great time.
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Joined: July 29th, 2015, 2:18 am

August 12th, 2015, 3:34 am #29

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
I set out on a good long day-trip yesterday with my kids - just to scout out the area and see if I wanted to plan a few days away on my own.

I paddled the South Mattawa River from the Beach at Pog, down White Fish Lk. and through to the bottom of Rock Lk. (and back to Pog).

Holy moly! What a canoe super-highway. That route was insane with traffic, even on an overcast Monday. And, it seems that almost every site was taken (I just wanted to have a peek at what the AP sites are like when compared to those in parks further north in Ontario). I also couldn't get over the quantity of crap that people had hauled to a paddle in site - chairs, dining shelters, beach toys, coolers (!!!), etc..

I did the Canoe-Tea-Smoke loop last summer and had a similar experience.

SO - it seems that I will be looking for a much more lightly travelled route for my solo adventures. Any suggestions?

On a positive note: Jeff's Map for the area was a God-send! Super-accurate! and I love that I could dunk-rinse it and hang it on the line to dry at the end of the day before a perfect refold. I am so impressed that I want to buy the whole set now. (I'm preaching to the converted here, I'm sure).

And - the Kipawa that I rented ... yowza! What a dream to paddle and carry. Time to start saving for an updated canoe - although not likely a Kip as I'm less impressed with soloing without a butt-rest when kneeling.

Extra bonus for the day was watching a momma Moose and her calf grazing at the shoreline just south of A36 on the map.
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Joined: July 31st, 2015, 9:41 pm

August 12th, 2015, 6:10 pm #30

Hello all!

I've enjoyed reading the boards, but I have a question to which I've not been able to find an answer. I'm hoping that you might help - with honesty.

Some background:
I am a middle-aged woman without a paddling partner. I am so very tired of being confined to campground camping and I'd like to venture out into the backcountry. I've been paddling for about 35 years so I have "some" experience. Most of my canoeing has been flatwater solo. Based on past experience, my ideal distance is 10-15km/day.

I've been camping for about as long as I have been canoeing - but only on car-based campgrounds. My usual preference is for quiet northern parks and walk-in sites.
I have most of my gear - save for that specific to backcountry and canoe (need dry-bags and food pack-hanging technique).
I have only portaged once - a 59-pound 17' canoe from Smoke Lk. back to the Portage Store. I used the tripod method to get it onto my shoulders.

My question is two-fold:
Can I, as a woman traveling solo, reasonably manage this trip (i.e. what is the likely harassment factor from other travelers, am I likely to be hassled)? Where would be a good place to start, to avoid problems with those lacking etiquette?
Is it insane to try and plan to do a first-time backcountry trip solo?

Any ideas and advice is most welcome!
Hi there,
Indeed usually in the summer months anything off hw 60 will be really busy, although, had you started from rock lake, you could have portaged to Pen (no motor boats and on to Clydegale, also boat less.
Myself, I will be doing the Tim river to Rosebary starting sept 3-8, with a paddling partner for that time, however, i can take time off till the 13th. I would like to go from shall lake to Shirley lake, has one 1 km long portage, and it will likely be very quiet as kids are back to school.For the tim river trip i will be renting a keewaydin 15 with pack canoe seat, as it makes for easier sitting, (kayak seat with back support)but will see how that works out.
If does not work out, then early in the trip before going to the tim,( i will be spending a few days doing day trips with the keewaydin to get used to a solo canoe. ) i will change it up to a kip, but am thinking of bringing my knee pads used for gardening, so kneeling wont be so painful. I have, until now, either used a sea kayak (georgianbay trips) or a tendem canoe (youngest daughter has the camping bug too) or a small kayak for day trips.Give me a shout if a padling partner is of interest to you.
wanda
Wanda spruyt
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