Joined: November 20th, 2011, 10:25 pm

August 14th, 2015, 3:32 am #21

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
Ya , the old story of the bears weren't so bad when there was a spring hunt ..... that story is twenty years old .
The good ole days Eh ? When sows were baited in spring with cubs nearby , is that the solution to ignorant human behaviour ?

Maybe time fer plan C
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Joined: July 8th, 2013, 6:58 pm

August 14th, 2015, 3:11 pm #22

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
just for fun, i called the o.f.a.h. to check bear numbers and issues in ontario. waiting for call back from wildlife biologist.
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Joined: August 31st, 2014, 11:44 pm

August 16th, 2015, 7:46 pm #23

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
OK
I'm going to stir the pot!
I'm with Swedish P on this one. The cost of a slug is very reasonable to control bears that have been habituated or are just plain trouble. Having said that, I also think control of irresponsible campers is in order by actually enforcing the powers of the Park Warden to impose fines.
Now before anyone gets upset with me for practicing my right to free speech, I just want to point out that I don' t eat meat or poultry because I don't support the way we treat and butcher animals we " raise for food". If you shot me a game animal I would gladly eat it. It has lived a good, albeit, hard life as it was meant to, and died a good death. If any animal is a threat to my safety, however, I reserve the right to remove the threat. I try to respect the outdoors and leave the bears alone - I expect the same in return. It may sound harsh to many of u - just be careful not to judge. Think of me when you bite into that next piece of beef.
K

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Joined: September 17th, 2014, 11:03 am

August 16th, 2015, 9:02 pm #24

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
I'm glad you said it Kelly. IMO, anyone with a real connection to nature, and I mean truly connected, would think the same way. We're fully part of the natural cycle, not observers despite our modern view of animals. I for one don't want to live in a world where consuming natural food, plants AND wild animals, is considered unnatural and barbaric. We should be reminded that agriculture is unnatural, not hunting and foraging. Our problem, is overpopulation, not game management.
Algonquin Park is a decent simulation of wilderness, not a zoo, and animals need to maintain a healthy respect for their competitors and predators, including US, as they have for thousands of years. If they don't, they shouldn't pass on their genes and learned behaviour. I prefer backcountry trips to front country and I would like NOT to have a problem campground bear "relocated" to my remote route.

So, now that I've said that, I guess I'll share the heat with you!
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EGB
Joined: July 31st, 2005, 7:48 pm

August 16th, 2015, 9:13 pm #25

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
I would share my favorite tarp with you blush
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Joined: August 31st, 2014, 11:44 pm

August 16th, 2015, 9:35 pm #26

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
Thanks for the support guys
I was a little nervous about the response. By no means do I not have sympathy for the bear with the injured paw or the little fellow I ran off, but I've become a realist having seen both animals and people suffer, I understand that is part of life. Let's hope Parks Canada starts putting some funding into education, not just advertisements aimed at getting people out to the parks, but what to expect and what THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES are in order to protect what little remains of our great Canadian wilderness.

K
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Joined: November 20th, 2011, 10:25 pm

August 17th, 2015, 1:17 am #27

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
I couldn't disagree more with this statement " The cost of a slug is very reasonable to control bears that have been habituated or are just plain trouble "

The problem as I see it and all Bear Wise programs suggest , is the human behaviour that causes the habituation of bears in the first place .


Enjoy your Highway 60 petting Zoo ......... next time in Algonquin , this fall , I'll enjoy a medium rare wild venison steak , cooked on an open fire in Algonquin North .
Will sleep well with no worry of problem humans .
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