Joined: August 31st, 2014, 11:44 pm

August 1st, 2015, 3:22 am #11

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
@ Chris
I read your post when you originally posted it and I totally related to your feelings about bears. Thankfully it ended well with a good story for you too.

Pog campground still had the warning for 7 bears up while I was there and so did LOTR caground have the same sign. Sounds like there's a team of them rotating through the area.

I did speak a little more with that couple, and to your point Shawn, I told them that I bet that young bear was likely the product of a camp bear. So sad. It's just a problem that perpetuates itself and gets worse with each generation.

And I DONT EVER WANT TO SEE A BEAR AGAIN. - I'd be good with that

K
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Joined: May 7th, 2015, 5:53 pm

August 4th, 2015, 2:33 pm #12

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
Just got back from Pog. Did not see any bears but the man who was leaving our site warned us that they saw a bear the previous night on the site and scared her down to the water.

Apparently the park nicknamed her Princess and she has an injured limp paw. He showed us a picture of her...well her bum while she ran off lol Park staff said she got into a tent to steal food. So keep an eye out:)
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Joined: February 25th, 2014, 1:22 pm

August 10th, 2015, 12:04 pm #13

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
Update: When I got to Pog Lake on friday night, the whiskeyjack staff at check-in told me 2 of the 7 bears (an adult of each sex) had been relocated. But on Sunday morning I saw one of the relocated bears back in the campground. (She had an injured front right paw that she never put on the ground, so when I reported the sighting to staff it was easy to confirm who she was.)

I also saw a small bear Saturday morning on the LOTR-Provoking Lake portage, but that one scampered off like a flushing grouse as soon as it saw us, probably scared I was Kelly.
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Joined: August 25th, 2013, 10:42 pm

August 11th, 2015, 12:08 pm #14

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
I was up at Canisbay for a few days last week & over the weekend. Wednesday night there were reports of their bear being in the area, and we heard a few horns going off until people started going off to bed. But didn't see it. My mother-in-law was laughing at my wife and I for how jumpy we were, checking every little noise with flashlights.

I'm surprised they aren't relocating these bears. The Wardens were really serious about bear-policy, as they should be, but you'd expect that if they're that much of a nuisance they'd take them somewhere more secluded. I'm sure there are reasons why they don't though.
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Joined: February 25th, 2014, 1:22 pm

August 11th, 2015, 12:11 pm #15

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
They are trying to relocate them. As I said above, they relocated two adults, and at least one of them found its way back already.
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Joined: July 8th, 2013, 6:58 pm

August 11th, 2015, 4:39 pm #16

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
it cost around 75 cent per slug,,, problem solved
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Joined: May 18th, 2015, 11:00 pm

August 11th, 2015, 5:06 pm #17

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
I think this is a joke?
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Joined: November 20th, 2011, 10:25 pm

August 11th, 2015, 10:46 pm #18

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
As with other national and provincial parks within Canada , and noticeably absent in Algonquin , I would support a system where the cost of a " 75 cent slug " you mention Swede , is directed towards a meaningful deterrent to minimize the natural instinct of ursus americanus . Where the ignorant human activity is held accountable to the privledge of such a visit .
Banishment for carless , ignorant human behaviour .

This does exist elsewhere .
Maybe time to relocate reckless humans that may think they are visiting the Toronto Zoo ..... Eh ?
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Joined: June 3rd, 2009, 9:39 pm

August 12th, 2015, 1:23 am #19

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
Relocating bears, or any wildlife, has proven to be useless, and dangerous to the relocated animal.

They will just come back to the easy-pickings that they know, or have grown up with. Just how many ear-tags can a bear collect before it's deemed "dangerous" and killed?

Plunking a strange animal into another animal's established territory isn't all that great an idea, either.

Why aren't the two-legged critters that are the cause of all the trouble "relocated" or "educated"?

I have to laugh when I think back on our car-camping days. Keep the food in the trunk of the car. Sheesh. That puts our food just a few feet from our tent!

I remember the time in Restoule PP looking at the incredible "kitchen" on one site. Was interesting to watch the woman put the groceries in it. Bread, hot dogs, etc.

No wonder the raccoons had a regular patrol through the campground.


Barbara
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Joined: July 8th, 2013, 6:58 pm

August 13th, 2015, 11:12 pm #20

Well, after 4 years of backcountry camping, I finally saw my first bear. Just got back from a 3 day trip at Pog Lake. Second day I paddled into LOTR and did the portage into Provoking Lake. I spent the day, paddling about, fishing ( caught the most SB and the biggest I've ever had ). Late in the afternoon, as I was making my way down the channel that runs E/NE, I approached the last campsite whereI saw a man standing at the edge of the water and a woman standing knee deep in. As I got closer the man said something I couldn't make out. " Baby what?" I asked not sure what he said across the water. " We have a baby bear in our camp" he repeated. He pointed to his left where not more than 10 ft away sat a yearling black bear. He sat at the waters edge, completely calm and unperturbed by the presents of humans. As I came closer they explained they didn't know where the mother was and didn't want to go back into their camp. They had been cleaning their pots by the water when they turned around and saw the bear just sitting there. At this point the yearling stood up looking into the campsite which was 5 ft above water level. He stood about 5' high. He then dropped onto all fours and began sniffing their pots which sat next to him ( clearly abandoned by the nervous couple ). Now, I have often remarked on previous posts, that I am terrified of bears, but a small yearling, no bigger than a sheep dog, is not a threat. As far as I was concerned, every second that bear stood there and no one did anything to create a negative impression on him, was a second that he got more comfortable with people. As someone who is out their alone, I don't want any bears thinking people are a non-threat. I've watched videos of people politely shooing bears away, thinking to myself,'they need to channel some inner rage and really make an impression on the animal'. So with this in mind, I said to the couple "This bear has to get out of your campsite - now!" I drove at him, yelling and screaming jumping from my canoe determined to drive him off. With a slightly confused look he turned and rambled up to the campsite with me behind him, swearing and yelling and raising holy hell - I was pretty awesome lol. I ran him into the woods were I stopped
and he stooped and looked back at me from 25 ft away. I started at him again running further in to make a point. I saw the tail end of him disappear into the pines. Now, he was cute, I will admit, and animal lover that I am, I would have loved to cuddle him, but that would not be in his best interest or any campers. The woman called from the camp " I have bear bangers. Should I fire one?" I told her go ahead a she shot it off except it wasn't a banger it was a flare which shot into the woods setting it all aglow with a red fiery light. Now the three of us forgot the bear, as we looked on in horror, thinking we had set the park on fire. The lady ran towards the red glow and checked that nothing was burning- all was well. Whew! Introductions were made and I explained that the yearling was likely kicked out by his Mama recently. I pointed out that he was not bawling for his mother as he was now used to being on his own which seemed to reassure them. I would also be concerned if I thought a mother bear was lurking about. They remarked they had a great story to tell and I said I was only sorry I didn't get a picture. Highlight of my trip.
K
ok so my plan "A ",was little over the top, although a controlled hunt might work during off season, like other provincial parks have done with deer.
american black bears eh! send`em back to P.A.
plan "B" i learned in chapleau game reserve. the black bear capital of ontario. buy a $20.00 marine air horn from canadian tire. cheaper if ya buy gas for coupons. these are about pop can size, do not shake before use. better then a whistle as ya hyper ventilate as the bear wonders around,,just sayn








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