Airfix 1/72 Gun Emplacement

Joined: June 16th, 2010, 9:25 am

October 4th, 2017, 10:46 am #1

Having done a little research on the potential calibres of both the emplacement and defence fort I post the following;

The gun emplacement calibre is about 3.5 mm actual so therefore at 1/72 = approximately 10.” The Vickers 10 inch naval gun was used on Japanese and RN battleships of the early part of the 20th century and could fire a 10” 500 lb shell 26,900 yards The actual bore of the defence fort is 3/16ths of an inch, or 4.5mm. It is therefore suggested that the calibre of these guns are 13.5’’ (34.29cm) perhaps captured British WW1 naval guns (typical calibre of the Orion class super Dreadnought battleship) weighing about 76 tonnes and firing a 1,250 lb (567kg) armour piercing cap or high explosive round 40,600 yards (37,120 m) at 40 degrees, an effective range of 23 miles. The shortest distance across the English Channel is 20.7 miles.
They could also be 10” (25.4cm) guns typical of those built for the IJN but used in shore batteries instead although the Gun Emplacement has this calibre weapon. They would have fired 500 pound shells out to a distance of 26,900 yards (15 miles) at an elevation of 30 degrees and each barrel would have weighed around 22 tons. Three direct hits would sink an average destroyer quite easily and of course a well-placed hit could disable or destroy any major vessel.

The German coastal battery Tirpitz, consisting mainly of three large 11’’ (280 mm) guns, was the most powerful coastal battery on the Romanian shore during World War II. The three guns came from spares for the World War I-era German Nassau-class dreadnoughts.

Effectiveness of Coastal Batteries
Were coastal batteries effective? Although they did not produce outstanding results, when they were effective – as with the destruction of the state of the art Blucher – they were outstanding. It is probably the case that they achieved their objective as a deterrent as warships avoided them. There are a number of case studies that support their value.
During the Battle of Drøbak Sound, Norway in April 1940, the German navy lost the new heavy cruiser Blücher, one of their most modern ships (and a sister ship to our fictional Seydlitz), to a combination of fire from various coastal artillery emplacements, including two obsolete German-made Krupp 11’’ (28cm) guns firing 560 lb shells. The Blücher had entered the narrow waters of the Oslofjord, carrying 1,000 soldiers and leading a German invasion fleet. The first salvo from the Norwegian defenders, fired from Oscarsborg Fortress about 1 mile (1,600 meters) distant, disabled Blücher's main battery and set her afire. The Norwegian gun crews were new having only been conscripted seven days before the battle.
In December 1941, during the Battle of Wake Island, US Marines fired at the Japanese invasion fleet with their six 5-inch (127 mm) guns, sinking the Japanese destroyer Hayate by scoring direct hits on her magazines, and scoring eleven hits on the light cruiser Yubari, forcing her to withdraw, and temporarily repulsing Japanese efforts to take the island.
On June 25, 1944 the U.S. battleship Texas engaged German shore batteries on the Cotentin Peninsula (Cherbourg, Normandy). Battery Hamburg straddled the ship with a salvo of 9.4’’ (240mm) shells, eventually hitting the Texas twice; one shell damaging the conning tower and navigation bridge and the other penetrating below decks but failing to explode.
Allied efforts to take the port of Toulon in August 1944 ran into "Big Willie", a battery consisting of two pre-war French turrets, equipped with the guns taken from the French battleship Provence, each mounting a pair of 13,38’’ (340 mm) naval guns. The range and power of these guns was such that the Allies dedicated a battleship or heavy cruiser to shelling the fort every day, with the battleship USS Nevada eventually silencing the guns on August 23, 1944
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Ratch
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Joined: April 22nd, 2006, 6:32 am

October 4th, 2017, 8:13 pm #2

I think these kits are 1/76 rather than 1/72 💡
Not sure how that affects your calculations ⚓
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Joined: June 16th, 2010, 9:25 am

October 4th, 2017, 8:42 pm #3

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Beaufighter
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October 8th, 2017, 8:03 pm #4

The only problem with the 13.5" theory (which came up a few years ago) is that they had 45 calibre-long barrels so just over 50 feet. In 1/76 scale those tubes should thus be about 8 inches long, which from memory they're not. 
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Joined: June 16th, 2010, 9:25 am

October 8th, 2017, 10:19 pm #5

Isn't everything 8" long?
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Beaufighter
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October 9th, 2017, 8:50 pm #6



8" = 20cm, roughly. From memory the coastal defence guns are maybe half that.
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Paws4thot
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October 10th, 2017, 11:54 am #7

My memory is much the same as Beaufighter's, and I agree the Imperial to metric conversion as  first order thing.

Also, I've a notion that the "Defence Fort" with the single gun had a similar size but not identical barrel, and a barbette that looks similar to the 15.2cm single mount on Kreigsmarine vessels.
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