Electrical Spinal Nerve Stimulation - Anyone done this?

andrewdb
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andrewdb
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Joined: June 21st, 2008, 7:34 am

July 11th, 2017, 12:58 pm #1

Hi Everyone,

I'm posting here after a looong time..

I met this doctor today at a pain clinic (In Sri Lanka) and she was talking about this. (Electrical Spinal Nerve Stimulation)
She said that if it works for me then I wouldnt have any pain. 17 years post accident and still go through a lot of pain!
This is not a viable option financially anyways as the device has to be replaced every 7 - 8 years through surgery.

But just wondering if this could really get rid of the pain?? If anyone has done it?

I'm not referring to tens machine.. i've tried that and hasnt helped me.
This way they surgically insert a device under the skin and the wires are inserted under the skin to the point where they are either connected to nerves or inserted into the spinal canal.

Andrew
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Blimey Charley
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Blimey Charley
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Joined: April 28th, 2013, 10:20 pm

July 13th, 2017, 1:12 pm #2

Hi Andrew, it's been a while since I was on here and it is exactly a year since I had my spinal nerve stimulator trial. Unfortunately for me it didn't work. I don't know if that's because of our type of injury or just my bad luck. Nearly all the people I spoke to that had had this surgery for other injuries and pain sites said it worked. Nobody I've heard of with a bpi has had any luck with it. ( I stand to corrected ) as I'm sure you'll agree we will give anything a go to get rid of the pain but so far nobody has found that one thing that switches it off. I wish you good luck sir, I'm sorry I couldn't be a more positive contributor.
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echbarnes
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echbarnes
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Joined: July 12th, 2006, 3:30 pm

July 20th, 2017, 11:00 am #3

Hi andrew.

Some people get good results from it. But many dont. It is worth a try though.

Ed
333 I'M A DEVIL DOING A HALF ARSED JOB
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Lucky Irish
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Lucky Irish
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Joined: September 7th, 2017, 2:38 pm

November 2nd, 2017, 11:31 pm #4

Hi Andrew,

I had the trial stimulator in for 10 days in October 2017 and I had a very good experience.where I spent nearly the whole trial with reduced nerve pain.
The amazing thing about the Boston Scientific group who worked together with the surgeon, they were able to reduce the electrical pulses so I could feel practically nothing as the pulses were running through my arms.
I am now waiting for the insurance company to give the ok and I cant wait to get it permanently. I have had to go on Norspan patches along with my usual cocktail of meds because the pain came back as bad as ever.
I hope this helps and it is a good idea to do lots of research but remember all treatments are different for everyone.

Good luck,
Allison
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NuckinFumpty
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NuckinFumpty
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Joined: March 6th, 2008, 8:52 pm

March 5th, 2018, 5:00 pm #5

Hi Andrew,
I had the stimulator trial 2 years ago now. 
For the first 2 days it was great but im not sure if that was the meds from the initial surgery to insert the stimulator. Unfortunately the technicians couldn't get it dialled in sufficiently to notice any sort of pain relief. I had to have the stimulator turned up quite high and because of that every time i moved my head/bent my neck more than a small amount the stimulator caused my neck/shoulder muscles to cramp up.
After 10 days of trying and ultimately failing to find a happy medium and some semblance of pain reduction the device was removed by the consultant. 
Be aware that once the stimulator has been removed the pain seemed to go through the roof for the next week or so.
And If Your Head Explodes With Dark Forebodings Too


Ill See You On The Dark Side Of The Moon
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jhoolit
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jhoolit
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Joined: July 5th, 2014, 11:12 am

July 12th, 2018, 8:13 pm #6

Hi Andrew,

I have the Nevro stimulator implanted, it's a higher frequency than the older types and supposedly much more effective. I have a definite improvement with the pain and therefore with my ability to do stuff. It is not a "cure" for the pain but quality of life is better although very severe spikes beat even this.  My thoughts on it were that if you don't try it you will never know, like everything else with this type of pain everyone is different.
Good luck
Jane
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jdbrowne
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jdbrowne
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Joined: October 18th, 2003, 2:04 am

July 20th, 2018, 2:23 pm #7

Hello Andrew,

Yes, I've actually tried this twice.  It was called a pain stimulator, with a unit implanted under the skin (in a "pocket") and electrodes implanted next to the spine.  Both times, I had to undergo (& pass) a "trial," where the unit was not implanted.  This way they could tell that it would work.

The first time (2006), when I went in for follow-up, they were expecting to adjust the power high enough to mask the pain signals.  When it got strong enough to do that, it caused a feeling like my left testicle was being squeezed with pliers.  The doctor tried everything he could think of (including a "revision"), but could not change things.  During the initial surgery, I was conscious enough that I could hear & understand the doctor and his technician discuss their vacations.  I was able to interact with the doctor, when hew asked me questions.  During the revision (with a different anesthesiologist), I was out!  I don't think I was as much help to the doctor...  answering his questions.

The second time (2010) with a different doctor and a new style of leads (electrodes), I had the implant surgery and went home to heal up.  About 3-4 days later (while watching Monday Night Football) I unknowingly developed a hematoma,causing me to go totally paralyzed.  I was rushed back to surgery, where the doctor removed the implants and hematoma to get the pressure off the spinal cord.  After an extensive stay in a rehab hospital and the in-home care, I was finally able to do just about everything I could do before.  I took a few months.

The implants cause a vibration that masks the pain feelings and it actually feels good.  If your doctor feels you are a good candidate, you should give it a try.  My doctor says he could re-do the implant and put in a "drain," so the hematoma couldn't return, but once you've gone paralyzed it's a bit more scary.  I am thinking about it again, as my daily (constant) pain has been significantly stronger for the last almost two weeks.  

Good luck,

Jeff
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