wyoming

wyoming

john lepage
john lepage

January 13th, 2004, 3:43 pm #1

Is this one rated so tough because of technical issues or length or both? In my brief reading of reports it appears there may be no need for ice axes, crampons or roping up. Do you concur?
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John M.
John M.

January 13th, 2004, 4:02 pm #2

On Gannett you get length, altitude, remoteness, elevation gain, snow, ice, weather. Some make it without rope. Others are fully equiped and terrified. It depends on your KSE.
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Tim T.
Tim T.

January 13th, 2004, 10:16 pm #3

After an unsuccessful attempt last August, even with crampons, axes, and ropes, I hadn't expected how dangerous the loose rock underfoot would be, nor the huge ones randomly crashing down.

The only thing I can think of to deal with that risk is to climb it 3-4 weeks earlier with better snowpack. We're gonna try organizing a better assault this year around the 4th of July.

Our group of 3 turned around in a 10 am storm a bit below the bergschrund. Later, we agreed we could have waited it out, but we had used a lot of adrenaline just trying to dodge boulders. Some we knocked loose ourselves on both sides of the steep Dinwoody Pass and others were just careening downhill from above the Gooseneck. The latter ones scared the hell out of us --imagine standing on a steep ice field in crampons with nowhere to hide, afraid to lose your footing, all while trying to track the fall line of car-sized boulders. A couple of them came to rest in big crevasses just 50 feet away from us.

Now that I'm writing this, I'm not sure why we're going back! Well, it is a spectacular camping wilderness in any case, and I do think from the trip reports of others that it is safe and doable with a well-trained group and decent weather.
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patrick
patrick

January 14th, 2004, 3:48 am #4

On Gannett you get length, altitude, remoteness, elevation gain, snow, ice, weather. Some make it without rope. Others are fully equiped and terrified. It depends on your KSE.
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

January 14th, 2004, 3:57 am #5

It stands for many things, including the Karachi Stock Exchange. In this context I believe it stands for knowledge, skills and experience.
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Joined: September 23rd, 2003, 4:11 pm

January 14th, 2004, 6:01 pm #6

On Gannett you get length, altitude, remoteness, elevation gain, snow, ice, weather. Some make it without rope. Others are fully equiped and terrified. It depends on your KSE.
As with most higher altitude climbs, Gannett varies dramatically with the seasons. I've climbed it twice from the east (Dubois side), once in July and once in mid September. During the July climb the route was clogged up with many folks at the bergschrund crossing so we traversed north a couple hundred yards and did a route variation. This also allowed us at least a bit of challenge as a summer ascent of the standard route is technically trivial (3rd class). However, our September climb was completed on blue, water ice with cold winds and fog. We were also completely alone on the mountain. So, you see the conditions are quite variable and exaggerate calendar-based effects that one might encounter at lower altitudes. I might add that during the summer climb the peak was populated by many, many people who were terrified, fully cramponed-up in slush, etc. Anecdotal reports from these people will certainly not mirror my own.
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Nute
Nute

January 14th, 2004, 6:48 pm #7

I have some specific questions for you off forum. Any chance you could e-mail me and I will reply with questions...thanks.
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Joined: September 23rd, 2003, 4:11 pm

January 15th, 2004, 4:42 pm #8

Hi Nute, I responded to your email address . . . was it received?
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pj
pj

January 15th, 2004, 10:39 pm #9

Is this one rated so tough because of technical issues or length or both? In my brief reading of reports it appears there may be no need for ice axes, crampons or roping up. Do you concur?
We did it in late July, but there was still a lot of snow that year. I certainly would not have done it without an ice axe. But crampons were quite helpful too. We started at 1 am, and zipped up the frozen snow as if we were walking on styrofoam with spiked feet. On the way down, we passed a group struggling up the mid morning slush, and they looked like they were having a much harder time than we did. So, in my experience at least, we maybe could have done it without crampons by starting later instead of in the middle of the night, but it was a lot easier going on cold stiff snow with crampons than it would have been postholing through the slush without them.
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Scott Patterson
Scott Patterson

January 16th, 2004, 4:31 am #10

How people in the forum have done both these peaks? various friends and myself have several different opinions as to which peak is more difficult. I guess it all depends on conditions at the time, but which peak did you find to be the tougher of the two, assuming the you take the standard route on each peak?
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