What is the highest peak in North America east of the Rockies?

What is the highest peak in North America east of the Rockies?

Joined: July 23rd, 2004, 7:04 pm

June 12th, 2006, 2:07 pm #1

I'm pretty sure the book I'm reading has it wrong. Before I reveal what the book says, I'm curious to see what the consensus is here. My guess is it's one of the Mexican volcanoes.
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Joined: January 26th, 2004, 5:02 pm

June 12th, 2006, 4:03 pm #2

First, your question uses the term "North America". What exactly do you mean by that? Is part of Central America in North America? Some people consider only US & Canada as part of North America. Do you include the various islands in the Carribbean? Greenland?

So now we have the question of the Rockies. What is the southern edge of the Rockies?

The Black Hills are technically not part of the Rockies, while the Ozarks are supposed to be part of the Appalachians.

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Joined: July 31st, 2004, 9:36 pm

June 12th, 2006, 8:33 pm #3

Pico Duarte in the Dominican Republic? Barbeau Peak on Ellesmere Island?

Just a few of the possibilities...
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Joined: May 14th, 2005, 4:39 pm

June 12th, 2006, 11:10 pm #4

I'm pretty sure the book I'm reading has it wrong. Before I reveal what the book says, I'm curious to see what the consensus is here. My guess is it's one of the Mexican volcanoes.
As I recall, there's a sign in the Visitor Center (or was it in the shelter at the top?) near Harney Peak claiming that it is the highest point east of the Rockies until you go all the way across the ocean to the Pyranees, or something along that line.  And that's the big problem:  you'd have to draw some boundary lines other than longitude/latitude lines to try to force this claim to be true.

I don't know what the real answer would be, since defining the northern and southern boundaries of this region "east of the Rockies" (as well as defining the exact point that marks the eastern boundary of the Rockies) would make all the difference in finding the highest point!


Diane Winger

www.HighpointAdventures.com
NEW: www.Colorado-for-Free.com
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

June 13th, 2006, 1:50 am #5

Diane, the claim to "highest point east of the Rockies and west of the Pyrenees" is mentioned on the plaque at the base of the tower atop Harney Peak. The day I was up there, it was about all I could see, since the top was thoroughly socked in by low clouds. More photos under the "highpointing" pulldown on my WWW site.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

June 13th, 2006, 1:50 pm #6

I'm pretty sure the book I'm reading has it wrong. Before I reveal what the book says, I'm curious to see what the consensus is here. My guess is it's one of the Mexican volcanoes.
Please refer to the scholarly analysis of this problem in Don Berens' article which appears on page 24 of Issue #70 (05-q3) of the Club's quarterly magazine, Apex to Zenith.

The crux of the matter is defining the eastern edge of the Rockies. Then you can pick the points east of that, such as Mt. Mitchell, which are higher. Orizaba happens to be in North America, which is what was asked.
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Joined: July 23rd, 2004, 7:04 pm

June 13th, 2006, 1:58 pm #7

I'm pretty sure the book I'm reading has it wrong. Before I reveal what the book says, I'm curious to see what the consensus is here. My guess is it's one of the Mexican volcanoes.
The book I'm reading is "The Horizontal Everest" by Jerry Kobalenko. In it, he claims it is "Mount Barbeau, at 8,743 feet the highest North American peak east of the Rockies." He doesn't elaborate more than that on what he means by "North American" or "east of the Rockies." It doesn't look like he did his research. I guess he means east of the Rockies AND north of Mexico.
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Joined: April 20th, 2004, 7:19 pm

June 13th, 2006, 5:26 pm #8

I could swear we established that, technically speaking, Mt. Barbeau on Ellesmere Island is the highest point east of the rockies - and also the highpoint of Canadian province of Nunavut.

I also seem to recall the general consensus also saying, "since it's one of the most remote spots on earth, as a practical matter, who cares?"
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 6:42 pm

June 13th, 2006, 6:55 pm #9

The book I'm reading is "The Horizontal Everest" by Jerry Kobalenko. In it, he claims it is "Mount Barbeau, at 8,743 feet the highest North American peak east of the Rockies." He doesn't elaborate more than that on what he means by "North American" or "east of the Rockies." It doesn't look like he did his research. I guess he means east of the Rockies AND north of Mexico.
Mexico, Greenland, and the Dominican Republic are commonly viewed as being within North America. Perhaps the author should evaluate Pico de Orizaba, Gunnbjorn, and Pico Duarte.
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