Voluntary Ban on Hikes Above 3000 in 'daks 'til mid-June

Voluntary Ban on Hikes Above 3000 in 'daks 'til mid-June

roger
roger

May 1st, 2000, 1:33 pm #1

This was posted in rec.backcountry.
http://www.remarq.com/read/bkcntry/q__vWVLqsGr0C-_Vb#LR

The thread notes that snow covers trails above 3,000 and it's mush between 2,000 and 3,000 feet.

For release: IMMEDIATE Contact: Kris Alberga, Senior Forester
Monday, April 24, 2000 (518) 897-1350

DEC ALERTS HIKERS TO TRAIL CONDITIONS IN HIGH PEAKS

A new season of outdoor hiking and recreation on public lands in the Adirondacks is
now upon us, Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Regional Director
Stuart A. Buchanan announced today. The public is encouraged to enjoy the
region's beautiful mountains and lakes, but high elevation trails in the Adirondacks
are again very muddy this spring due to snowmelt and rain. Hiker's boots in the high
country at this time of year can disturb the soft ground, damage vegetation and
cause erosion. DEC is asking hikers to voluntarily avoid trails above 3,000 feet in
elevation until mid-June, particularly the high elevation trails in the Dix, Giant, and
High Peaks Wilderness Areas of the northern Adirondacks.

Hikers are advised to use trails at lower elevations during the spring mud season.
These trails usually dry soon after snowmelt and are on less erosive soils than the
higher peaks. Please avoid the following trails until conditions improve:

High Peaks Wilderness Area - all trails above 3,000 feet; wet muddy snow
conditions still prevail, specifically: Algonquin, Colden, Feldspar, Gothics, Indian
Pass, Lake Arnold Cross-Over, Marcy, Marcy Dam - Avalanche - Lake Colden which
is extremely wet, Phelps Trail above John Brook Lodge, Range Trail, Skylight, Wright
and all "trail-less" peaks

Dix Wilderness - all trails above Elk Lake and Round Pond

Giant Wilderness - all trails above Giant's Washbowl, "the Cobbles", and Owls Head.

Some alternative trails suggested for hiking, depending on the weather, are listed
below.

Debar Mt. Wild Forest:
Azure Mt.
Giant Mt. Wilderness:
Giant's Washbowl
Roaring Brook Falls
High Peaks Wilderness:
Ampersand Mt.
Cascade
Big Slide
Brothers
Porter from Cascade; stay off other approaches
Hurricane Primitive Area:
The Crows
Hurricane Mt. from Route 9N
McKenzie Mt. Wilderness:
Haystack Mt.
McKenzie Mt.
Pharaoh Wilderness:
Pharaoh Mt.
Saranac Lakes Wild Forest:
Baker Mt.
Panther Mt.
Scar Face Mt.
Taylor Pond Wild Forest:
Poke-O-Moonshine

Another option for experienced hikers is to try a bushwack hike up many of the small mountains with great
views. Bring and use your map and compass.

For more information, visit the trail conditions on the World Wide Web at
[url=http:///www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dlf/publands/adktrails.html]http:///www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dlf/publands/adktrails.html[/url] or call the DEC Region 5 Lands and Forests
Office in Ray Brook at (518) 897-1200.

###
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t
t

May 31st, 2000, 1:11 am #2

test
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Bob Wong
Bob Wong

July 13th, 2000, 2:45 pm #3

This was posted in rec.backcountry.
http://www.remarq.com/read/bkcntry/q__vWVLqsGr0C-_Vb#LR

The thread notes that snow covers trails above 3,000 and it's mush between 2,000 and 3,000 feet.

For release: IMMEDIATE Contact: Kris Alberga, Senior Forester
Monday, April 24, 2000 (518) 897-1350

DEC ALERTS HIKERS TO TRAIL CONDITIONS IN HIGH PEAKS

A new season of outdoor hiking and recreation on public lands in the Adirondacks is
now upon us, Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Regional Director
Stuart A. Buchanan announced today. The public is encouraged to enjoy the
region's beautiful mountains and lakes, but high elevation trails in the Adirondacks
are again very muddy this spring due to snowmelt and rain. Hiker's boots in the high
country at this time of year can disturb the soft ground, damage vegetation and
cause erosion. DEC is asking hikers to voluntarily avoid trails above 3,000 feet in
elevation until mid-June, particularly the high elevation trails in the Dix, Giant, and
High Peaks Wilderness Areas of the northern Adirondacks.

Hikers are advised to use trails at lower elevations during the spring mud season.
These trails usually dry soon after snowmelt and are on less erosive soils than the
higher peaks. Please avoid the following trails until conditions improve:

High Peaks Wilderness Area - all trails above 3,000 feet; wet muddy snow
conditions still prevail, specifically: Algonquin, Colden, Feldspar, Gothics, Indian
Pass, Lake Arnold Cross-Over, Marcy, Marcy Dam - Avalanche - Lake Colden which
is extremely wet, Phelps Trail above John Brook Lodge, Range Trail, Skylight, Wright
and all "trail-less" peaks

Dix Wilderness - all trails above Elk Lake and Round Pond

Giant Wilderness - all trails above Giant's Washbowl, "the Cobbles", and Owls Head.

Some alternative trails suggested for hiking, depending on the weather, are listed
below.

Debar Mt. Wild Forest:
Azure Mt.
Giant Mt. Wilderness:
Giant's Washbowl
Roaring Brook Falls
High Peaks Wilderness:
Ampersand Mt.
Cascade
Big Slide
Brothers
Porter from Cascade; stay off other approaches
Hurricane Primitive Area:
The Crows
Hurricane Mt. from Route 9N
McKenzie Mt. Wilderness:
Haystack Mt.
McKenzie Mt.
Pharaoh Wilderness:
Pharaoh Mt.
Saranac Lakes Wild Forest:
Baker Mt.
Panther Mt.
Scar Face Mt.
Taylor Pond Wild Forest:
Poke-O-Moonshine

Another option for experienced hikers is to try a bushwack hike up many of the small mountains with great
views. Bring and use your map and compass.

For more information, visit the trail conditions on the World Wide Web at
[url=http:///www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dlf/publands/adktrails.html]http:///www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dlf/publands/adktrails.html[/url] or call the DEC Region 5 Lands and Forests
Office in Ray Brook at (518) 897-1200.

###
marcy OR ABOVE 3000


I see the voluntary ban on hikes above 3000, what above middle of winter hikes? above 3000 would this be violating the spirit/intent?

Alternatively, what is the latest period DEC suggests we could hike-- Would THANKSGIVING be OK?

Thanks for your help....

BOB WONG
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