Study: Viagra Improves Oxygen Capacity for Climbers

Study: Viagra Improves Oxygen Capacity for Climbers

roger
roger

September 27th, 2001, 2:22 pm #1

Many thanks to the Climbing News for this tip.
http://www.climbingnews.org


Viagra really can help men climb mountains
By Jeremy Laurance Health Editor
27 September 2001

Scientists at Hammersmith Hospital in London have found that the cure for impotency may also boost the oxygen- absorbing capacity of the lungs in climbers, preventing mountain sickness. Working with colleagues from the National Centre of Cardiology in Bishkek, Kurdistan, where many people live at high altitude, they observed that the same enzyme that caused men to droop by constricting blood vessels in the penis also produced breathlessness at high altitude by constricting the arteries in the lungs.

A dose of Viagra, which inhibits the enzyme, called phosphodiesterase,meant climbers could breathe more easily on the mountain tops. The find may bring to climbing a new erotic charge – giving a different meaning to the "mile high club". It might also make the pills a key part of the medical kit on Everest expeditions.

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health ... tory=96327
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John M
John M

September 27th, 2001, 5:31 pm #2

Oh. I see it's just a report on another website.

I had thought that you had done your own studies.

Not so exciting.

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Scott Surgent
Scott Surgent

September 27th, 2001, 6:42 pm #3

Many thanks to the Climbing News for this tip.
http://www.climbingnews.org


Viagra really can help men climb mountains
By Jeremy Laurance Health Editor
27 September 2001

Scientists at Hammersmith Hospital in London have found that the cure for impotency may also boost the oxygen- absorbing capacity of the lungs in climbers, preventing mountain sickness. Working with colleagues from the National Centre of Cardiology in Bishkek, Kurdistan, where many people live at high altitude, they observed that the same enzyme that caused men to droop by constricting blood vessels in the penis also produced breathlessness at high altitude by constricting the arteries in the lungs.

A dose of Viagra, which inhibits the enzyme, called phosphodiesterase,meant climbers could breathe more easily on the mountain tops. The find may bring to climbing a new erotic charge – giving a different meaning to the "mile high club". It might also make the pills a key part of the medical kit on Everest expeditions.

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health ... tory=96327
Bishkek is in Kyrgyzstan, I believe. Kurdistan is the unofficial lands of E Turkey and N Iraq that would like to be independent but historically has been the brunt of many pogroms.

Wouldn't Viagra make a hard climb even harder?

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John M
John M

September 27th, 2001, 7:39 pm #4

Climbing with Viagra in your system would make you rise faster.

Thus you reach the summit sooner

Good catch re Kurds . . .

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 28th, 2001, 1:37 pm #5

Many thanks to the Climbing News for this tip.
http://www.climbingnews.org


Viagra really can help men climb mountains
By Jeremy Laurance Health Editor
27 September 2001

Scientists at Hammersmith Hospital in London have found that the cure for impotency may also boost the oxygen- absorbing capacity of the lungs in climbers, preventing mountain sickness. Working with colleagues from the National Centre of Cardiology in Bishkek, Kurdistan, where many people live at high altitude, they observed that the same enzyme that caused men to droop by constricting blood vessels in the penis also produced breathlessness at high altitude by constricting the arteries in the lungs.

A dose of Viagra, which inhibits the enzyme, called phosphodiesterase,meant climbers could breathe more easily on the mountain tops. The find may bring to climbing a new erotic charge – giving a different meaning to the "mile high club". It might also make the pills a key part of the medical kit on Everest expeditions.

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health ... tory=96327
It's as basic an axiom for athletes as drinking plenty of water in the first place. Clearer urine means better hydration; a strong yellow color means dehydration.

But now a team of researchers at the University of Connecticut has come up with a urine color chart designed for real-world outdoor use that accurately measures hydration levels.

The strip, which ranges from pale yellow to brownish-green, was field-tested on trail runners and mountain bikers.
http://www.outsidemag.com/news/headline ... _tue3.html
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Danny
Danny

September 29th, 2001, 4:24 am #6

I was disappointed that they did not have a picture of the color chart so I could take it hiking. I need more weight in my pack.
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roger
roger

October 4th, 2001, 9:31 pm #7

Many thanks to the Climbing News for this tip.
http://www.climbingnews.org


Viagra really can help men climb mountains
By Jeremy Laurance Health Editor
27 September 2001

Scientists at Hammersmith Hospital in London have found that the cure for impotency may also boost the oxygen- absorbing capacity of the lungs in climbers, preventing mountain sickness. Working with colleagues from the National Centre of Cardiology in Bishkek, Kurdistan, where many people live at high altitude, they observed that the same enzyme that caused men to droop by constricting blood vessels in the penis also produced breathlessness at high altitude by constricting the arteries in the lungs.

A dose of Viagra, which inhibits the enzyme, called phosphodiesterase,meant climbers could breathe more easily on the mountain tops. The find may bring to climbing a new erotic charge – giving a different meaning to the "mile high club". It might also make the pills a key part of the medical kit on Everest expeditions.

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health ... tory=96327
From this post in rec.backcountry, it looks like the best precaution for altitude sickness is to have a big head or being taking Ginkgo biloba. The study also noted that the classic "over hydration" has no effect!
----------------------
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&t ... ackcountry

From: Fwank Lichtenklitz (fwank@wanklichtenklitz.com)
Subject: The Latest Re: High Altitude Illness
Newsgroups: rec.backcountry, rec.climbing
View this article only
Date: 2001-10-03 21:56:35 PST


From:
Review Articles
High Altitude Illness, Peter Hackett, MD and Robert C. Roach, Ph.D.
New England Journal of Medicine, July 12, 2001

Highlights:

1991 Colorado study: acute mountain sickness (AMS) in 22% @ 7000-9000ft;
42% @ 10,000ft. Risk factors include previous bouts of AMS, residence
below 2800ft, exertion, and preexisting cardiopulmonary conditions.
Persons over 50 years of age are somewhat less susceptible to AMS
whereas children are about as susceptible as adults. Women are less
susceptible than men to HAPE (High Altitude Pulmonary Edema) but equally
prone to AMS. Physical fitness is not protective against high-altitude
sickness. Genetic factors and the environment probably explain varying
individual susceptibilities. Descent of only 1500 to 3000ft usually
leads to resolution of AMS (HACE--high altitude cerebral edema--may
require greater descent).

New evidence suggests that ALL people have swelling of the brain at high
altitudes. One hypothesis is that those with a higher cerebrospinal
fluid volume to brain volume experience AMS less often, since they have
more skull space with which to accommodate brain swelling.

400mg to 600mg of ibuprofen decreased or resolved high-altitude headache.

Gradual ascent is still the best strategy for AMS avoidance.

In two controlled trials, Ginkgo biloba (80mg-120mg orally
twice daily) prevented AMS during a gradual ascent to 15,000ft and was
50% effective in an abrupt ascent to 12,500ft. Prophylactic aspirin
(325mg every four hours totaling three doses) reduced the incidence of
headache from 50% to 7%.

The notion that overhydration prevents AMS has no scientific basis. (!)

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roger
roger

January 25th, 2002, 9:21 pm #8

Researchers at St Raffaele University in Milan, led by Dr George Cremona, assessed 262 people who climbed Monte Rosa – a 4,559-metre mountain on the Swiss-Italian border – before ascent and about 24 hours later on the summit, one hour after the climbers’ arrival.

One climber had severe HAPE, say the researchers, and significantly, 40 had evidence of lung function deterioration. Of these, 34 showed indications of subclinical HAPE.

Tests of closing volume of the lungs showed a further 146 climbers had signs of subclinical HAPE at altitude.

Dr Cremona says that, based on his diagnostic criteria, his data suggests that “three of every four healthy, recreational climbers have mild subclinical HAPE shortly after a modest climb”.


http://www.health-news.co.uk/showstory.asp?id=77035
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

January 25th, 2002, 10:05 pm #9

Note that the summit elevation of the modest climb referenced in the study is higher than anything in the Lower 48. I think the term modest is in reference to world-class mountains.
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Jared
Jared

January 26th, 2002, 5:12 am #10

Researchers at St Raffaele University in Milan, led by Dr George Cremona, assessed 262 people who climbed Monte Rosa – a 4,559-metre mountain on the Swiss-Italian border – before ascent and about 24 hours later on the summit, one hour after the climbers’ arrival.

One climber had severe HAPE, say the researchers, and significantly, 40 had evidence of lung function deterioration. Of these, 34 showed indications of subclinical HAPE.

Tests of closing volume of the lungs showed a further 146 climbers had signs of subclinical HAPE at altitude.

Dr Cremona says that, based on his diagnostic criteria, his data suggests that “three of every four healthy, recreational climbers have mild subclinical HAPE shortly after a modest climb”.


http://www.health-news.co.uk/showstory.asp?id=77035
I would be suspious of any such study that tries to generalize such findings without considerations of acclimatization. Some peaks like Whitney are often day hiked or done in a day or so, where as people who spend a little more time at alltitude are much less likley to get symptoms of HAPE, AMS, or the others. Anyway, there's my rant for teh evening, Climb Safe, Jared
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