Snow Machines, Clear Cutting and More Ski Trails Controversy at Arizona Snowbowl

Snow Machines, Clear Cutting and More Ski Trails Controversy at Arizona Snowbowl

roger
roger

October 16th, 2002, 2:01 pm #1

The U.S. Forest Service's multiple-use mission is being put to the test as it tries to balance religious and recreational issues in the proposed upgrade of the Arizona Snowbowl ski area.
Snowmaking is on tap assuring decades of "consistent" winter seasons, says the Forest Service.
Also proposed are new lifts, night lighting, expanded lodges and 70 more clearcut acres of new skiing terrain
That's a stark contrast to the vision of traditional Native Americans, who say the ponderosa pine and aspen ridges are religious shrines and that the craggy summits are the abodes of powerful spirits.
As the public comment period on the Snowbowl plan ends later this month without meetings on the Hopi or Navajo reservations, the Forest Service will be under pressure to prove that it is adequately considering the religious and cultural significance of the Peaks.
The last time the Snowbowl came in conflict with Native American beliefs, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that the existence of the ski area on the Peaks does not prohibit the practice of native religions.
But native activists such a Klee Benally, a Navajo who practices his religion on the mountain, are skeptical that cultural and spiritual values will be protected by the Forest Service or federal law.
The Navajo call San Francisco Mountain the "House of Light" and say they are one of four mountains marking the cardinal points of the universe. The Apaches say the mountain features prominently in a great deluge recounted in their mythology.
"There is no other place like it in the world. You have to understand the Navajo way of life is connected physically, spiritually and psychologically to these sacred mountains," said Benally, a member of the Dineh Bidzhiil Coalition.
Activists also asked the Forest Service to expand the comment period to 120 days, she said.
But the Forest Service says the 45-day comment period is sufficient and will end Nov. 14 after two meetings are held in Flagstaff. The next meeting will be held Oct. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Flagstaff High School.

More:
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=50842

Here's highlights of the proposal (it notes this was proposed after the snowbowl was open only 4 days in 2001-2002)
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/coconino/news_s ... ound.shtml

Links on the Forest Service page on the snowbowl
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... s+snowbowl
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

October 17th, 2002, 11:35 pm #2

Now is a good time to see <a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... 50959>fall colors</a> on the slopes of the <a href=http://www.mindspring.com/~manyturns/pe ... ks.jpg>San Francisco Peaks</a> near Flagstaff. However, you better hurry. Snow has already fallen at <a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com/>Arizona Snowbowl</a>, covering some <a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com/IMAGES/F ... l.JPG>cars in the parking lot</a> with a layer of snow.

Do you want to find out what Flagstaff residents think about snowmaking? Read some of these <a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/opinion/letters.cfm>letters to the editor</a> in the <a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/news/>Arizona Daily Sun</a>. Flagstaff business leaders <a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com/news%20r ... tm>support snowmaking</a>, as well as at least <a href=http://www.rickrenziforcongress.com/ric ... es.php>one of the two major party candidates</a> for U.S. Congress in the northern Arizona district (I couldn't find out what the <a href=http://www.gogeorgego.com/>other candidate</a>'s view about snowmaking are).
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

October 23rd, 2002, 6:34 pm #3

The U.S. Forest Service's multiple-use mission is being put to the test as it tries to balance religious and recreational issues in the proposed upgrade of the Arizona Snowbowl ski area.
Snowmaking is on tap assuring decades of "consistent" winter seasons, says the Forest Service.
Also proposed are new lifts, night lighting, expanded lodges and 70 more clearcut acres of new skiing terrain
That's a stark contrast to the vision of traditional Native Americans, who say the ponderosa pine and aspen ridges are religious shrines and that the craggy summits are the abodes of powerful spirits.
As the public comment period on the Snowbowl plan ends later this month without meetings on the Hopi or Navajo reservations, the Forest Service will be under pressure to prove that it is adequately considering the religious and cultural significance of the Peaks.
The last time the Snowbowl came in conflict with Native American beliefs, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that the existence of the ski area on the Peaks does not prohibit the practice of native religions.
But native activists such a Klee Benally, a Navajo who practices his religion on the mountain, are skeptical that cultural and spiritual values will be protected by the Forest Service or federal law.
The Navajo call San Francisco Mountain the "House of Light" and say they are one of four mountains marking the cardinal points of the universe. The Apaches say the mountain features prominently in a great deluge recounted in their mythology.
"There is no other place like it in the world. You have to understand the Navajo way of life is connected physically, spiritually and psychologically to these sacred mountains," said Benally, a member of the Dineh Bidzhiil Coalition.
Activists also asked the Forest Service to expand the comment period to 120 days, she said.
But the Forest Service says the 45-day comment period is sufficient and will end Nov. 14 after two meetings are held in Flagstaff. The next meeting will be held Oct. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Flagstaff High School.

More:
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=50842

Here's highlights of the proposal (it notes this was proposed after the snowbowl was open only 4 days in 2001-2002)
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/coconino/news_s ... ound.shtml

Links on the Forest Service page on the snowbowl
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... s+snowbowl
<a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... 40>Arizona Snowbowl</a> officials are trying to get more Phoenix-area residents to weigh in on their proposal to add snowmaking equipment. Because 76 percent of Snowbowl skiers and snowboarders are from Phoenix metropolitan area, the ski area wants more of them to respond to the Forest Service's request for comment on the proposal.

http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=51540
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roger
roger

November 24th, 2002, 11:36 pm #4

The U.S. Forest Service's multiple-use mission is being put to the test as it tries to balance religious and recreational issues in the proposed upgrade of the Arizona Snowbowl ski area.
Snowmaking is on tap assuring decades of "consistent" winter seasons, says the Forest Service.
Also proposed are new lifts, night lighting, expanded lodges and 70 more clearcut acres of new skiing terrain
That's a stark contrast to the vision of traditional Native Americans, who say the ponderosa pine and aspen ridges are religious shrines and that the craggy summits are the abodes of powerful spirits.
As the public comment period on the Snowbowl plan ends later this month without meetings on the Hopi or Navajo reservations, the Forest Service will be under pressure to prove that it is adequately considering the religious and cultural significance of the Peaks.
The last time the Snowbowl came in conflict with Native American beliefs, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that the existence of the ski area on the Peaks does not prohibit the practice of native religions.
But native activists such a Klee Benally, a Navajo who practices his religion on the mountain, are skeptical that cultural and spiritual values will be protected by the Forest Service or federal law.
The Navajo call San Francisco Mountain the "House of Light" and say they are one of four mountains marking the cardinal points of the universe. The Apaches say the mountain features prominently in a great deluge recounted in their mythology.
"There is no other place like it in the world. You have to understand the Navajo way of life is connected physically, spiritually and psychologically to these sacred mountains," said Benally, a member of the Dineh Bidzhiil Coalition.
Activists also asked the Forest Service to expand the comment period to 120 days, she said.
But the Forest Service says the 45-day comment period is sufficient and will end Nov. 14 after two meetings are held in Flagstaff. The next meeting will be held Oct. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Flagstaff High School.

More:
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=50842

Here's highlights of the proposal (it notes this was proposed after the snowbowl was open only 4 days in 2001-2002)
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/coconino/news_s ... ound.shtml

Links on the Forest Service page on the snowbowl
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... s+snowbowl
The Forest Service will travel to the Hopi reservation on Monday, Dec. 9, to hold two public meetings on its plan to upgrade the Arizona Snowbowl ski area.
The time and location of the meetings have not been set at this time. The Hopi Tribe is coordinating those details, said Coconino National Forest spokeswoman Raquel Poturalski.

After two public sessions in Flagstaff, and the submission of thousands of letters, calls and e-mails, the official 45-day public comment period ended Nov. 15.

But because the Hopi Tribe requested a public meeting before Nov. 15, comments from the two meetings will be included in the draft environmental report being compiled, said Poturalski.

The Navajo Nation has not requested public meetings on the plan, she added.

The Forest Service expects to begin environmental studies on the proposal in the spring, with a final recommendation to the Coconino National Forest supervisor within two years.

For meeting times and locations, interested persons are asked to call the Hopi Nation at (928) 734-2441.

http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=53847
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

December 18th, 2002, 11:07 pm #5

The U.S. Forest Service's multiple-use mission is being put to the test as it tries to balance religious and recreational issues in the proposed upgrade of the Arizona Snowbowl ski area.
Snowmaking is on tap assuring decades of "consistent" winter seasons, says the Forest Service.
Also proposed are new lifts, night lighting, expanded lodges and 70 more clearcut acres of new skiing terrain
That's a stark contrast to the vision of traditional Native Americans, who say the ponderosa pine and aspen ridges are religious shrines and that the craggy summits are the abodes of powerful spirits.
As the public comment period on the Snowbowl plan ends later this month without meetings on the Hopi or Navajo reservations, the Forest Service will be under pressure to prove that it is adequately considering the religious and cultural significance of the Peaks.
The last time the Snowbowl came in conflict with Native American beliefs, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that the existence of the ski area on the Peaks does not prohibit the practice of native religions.
But native activists such a Klee Benally, a Navajo who practices his religion on the mountain, are skeptical that cultural and spiritual values will be protected by the Forest Service or federal law.
The Navajo call San Francisco Mountain the "House of Light" and say they are one of four mountains marking the cardinal points of the universe. The Apaches say the mountain features prominently in a great deluge recounted in their mythology.
"There is no other place like it in the world. You have to understand the Navajo way of life is connected physically, spiritually and psychologically to these sacred mountains," said Benally, a member of the Dineh Bidzhiil Coalition.
Activists also asked the Forest Service to expand the comment period to 120 days, she said.
But the Forest Service says the 45-day comment period is sufficient and will end Nov. 14 after two meetings are held in Flagstaff. The next meeting will be held Oct. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Flagstaff High School.

More:
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=50842

Here's highlights of the proposal (it notes this was proposed after the snowbowl was open only 4 days in 2001-2002)
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/coconino/news_s ... ound.shtml

Links on the Forest Service page on the snowbowl
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... s+snowbowl
<a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com>Arizona Snowbowl</a> recieived <a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=55643> three to six inches of snow during a Monday night storm</a>, but the ski area is still a good 2 feet of base away from opening in time for the holiday ski rush. However, <a href=http://www.sunriseskipark.com/default.shtml>Sunrise Park Resort</a> in Arizona's White Mountains has a 18"-22" of new snow and a base of 28"-36", and it is expected to open Thursday, Dec. 19.
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

December 23rd, 2002, 11:15 pm #6

The U.S. Forest Service's multiple-use mission is being put to the test as it tries to balance religious and recreational issues in the proposed upgrade of the Arizona Snowbowl ski area.
Snowmaking is on tap assuring decades of "consistent" winter seasons, says the Forest Service.
Also proposed are new lifts, night lighting, expanded lodges and 70 more clearcut acres of new skiing terrain
That's a stark contrast to the vision of traditional Native Americans, who say the ponderosa pine and aspen ridges are religious shrines and that the craggy summits are the abodes of powerful spirits.
As the public comment period on the Snowbowl plan ends later this month without meetings on the Hopi or Navajo reservations, the Forest Service will be under pressure to prove that it is adequately considering the religious and cultural significance of the Peaks.
The last time the Snowbowl came in conflict with Native American beliefs, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that the existence of the ski area on the Peaks does not prohibit the practice of native religions.
But native activists such a Klee Benally, a Navajo who practices his religion on the mountain, are skeptical that cultural and spiritual values will be protected by the Forest Service or federal law.
The Navajo call San Francisco Mountain the "House of Light" and say they are one of four mountains marking the cardinal points of the universe. The Apaches say the mountain features prominently in a great deluge recounted in their mythology.
"There is no other place like it in the world. You have to understand the Navajo way of life is connected physically, spiritually and psychologically to these sacred mountains," said Benally, a member of the Dineh Bidzhiil Coalition.
Activists also asked the Forest Service to expand the comment period to 120 days, she said.
But the Forest Service says the 45-day comment period is sufficient and will end Nov. 14 after two meetings are held in Flagstaff. The next meeting will be held Oct. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Flagstaff High School.

More:
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=50842

Here's highlights of the proposal (it notes this was proposed after the snowbowl was open only 4 days in 2001-2002)
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/coconino/news_s ... ound.shtml

Links on the Forest Service page on the snowbowl
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... s+snowbowl
There is a <a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... =56055>lot of snow falling</a> in northern Arizona this week, so <a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com/INDEX2.HTM>Arizona Snowbowl</a> will open for business on Friday, Dec. 27.
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

December 24th, 2002, 8:04 pm #7

<a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... wenty-nine of thirty-two runs at Arizona Snowbowl will be open on Friday</a>.
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Jeffrey Cook
Jeffrey Cook

December 25th, 2002, 8:42 pm #8

There is a <a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... =56055>lot of snow falling</a> in northern Arizona this week, so <a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com/INDEX2.HTM>Arizona Snowbowl</a> will open for business on Friday, Dec. 27.
I've been planning a hike or climb of Humphreys on Sunday the 29th. If there's really 3 feet of snow at Midway, it sounds like it's more likely to be a climb! Anyone interested in going along?
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

December 27th, 2002, 6:10 pm #9

<a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... wenty-nine of thirty-two runs at Arizona Snowbowl will be open on Friday</a>.
<a href=http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... 6234>Click here to read the article</a>.
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

January 26th, 2003, 8:21 am #10

The U.S. Forest Service's multiple-use mission is being put to the test as it tries to balance religious and recreational issues in the proposed upgrade of the Arizona Snowbowl ski area.
Snowmaking is on tap assuring decades of "consistent" winter seasons, says the Forest Service.
Also proposed are new lifts, night lighting, expanded lodges and 70 more clearcut acres of new skiing terrain
That's a stark contrast to the vision of traditional Native Americans, who say the ponderosa pine and aspen ridges are religious shrines and that the craggy summits are the abodes of powerful spirits.
As the public comment period on the Snowbowl plan ends later this month without meetings on the Hopi or Navajo reservations, the Forest Service will be under pressure to prove that it is adequately considering the religious and cultural significance of the Peaks.
The last time the Snowbowl came in conflict with Native American beliefs, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that the existence of the ski area on the Peaks does not prohibit the practice of native religions.
But native activists such a Klee Benally, a Navajo who practices his religion on the mountain, are skeptical that cultural and spiritual values will be protected by the Forest Service or federal law.
The Navajo call San Francisco Mountain the "House of Light" and say they are one of four mountains marking the cardinal points of the universe. The Apaches say the mountain features prominently in a great deluge recounted in their mythology.
"There is no other place like it in the world. You have to understand the Navajo way of life is connected physically, spiritually and psychologically to these sacred mountains," said Benally, a member of the Dineh Bidzhiil Coalition.
Activists also asked the Forest Service to expand the comment period to 120 days, she said.
But the Forest Service says the 45-day comment period is sufficient and will end Nov. 14 after two meetings are held in Flagstaff. The next meeting will be held Oct. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Flagstaff High School.

More:
http://www.azdailysun.com/non_sec/nav_i ... ryID=50842

Here's highlights of the proposal (it notes this was proposed after the snowbowl was open only 4 days in 2001-2002)
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/coconino/news_s ... ound.shtml

Links on the Forest Service page on the snowbowl
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... s+snowbowl
This is the question asked on the front page of the <a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com/INDEX2.HTM>Arizona Snowbowl</a> website. With little new snow falling recently, it appears that the Snowbowl has to resort to offering special deals to attract skiers. From Jan. 27 to Feb. 2, you can get <a href=http://www.arizonasnowbowl.com/beach_party.htm>2 for 1 lift tickets</a> at the Snowbowl. Only two lifts are operating, and <a href=http://arizonasnowbowl.com/Snowreport.htm>no beginner terrain</a> is available.
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