Second Quarter 2009 Accidents/Rescues

Second Quarter 2009 Accidents/Rescues

Joined: January 21st, 2004, 4:12 am

April 17th, 2009, 4:05 am #1

We will post second quarter 2009 accidents/rescues here.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 4:12 am

April 17th, 2009, 4:06 am #2

We will post April accident reports here.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 4:12 am

April 17th, 2009, 4:12 am #3

Thank you to Garvin Louie of Exeter, NH for sending me these links.

GORHAM, N.H. (AP) - Two climbers escaped serious injury when they were carried in an avalanche in the White Mountain's Tuckerman Ravine, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The climbers, Tim Finocchio and Dan Zucker, had planned to access hiking trails to the summit of Mount Washington, then descend through Tuckerman Ravine. But suddenly the snow gave out.

"One ax was in the snow and I was about to swing the other ax, and everything around me just cracked," Zucker described.

Forest Service Snow Ranger Jeff Lane says the two were incredibly lucky -- they managed to pass through a rocky section unscathed and land on top of the snow in some trees Saturday.

Both were carried downhill over a small cliff and down a slope, and one seemed able to slow himself a bit.

Click here to read the article.

(April 15) - Twice in less than a minute, Daniel Zucker thought: "This is where I die."

An avalanche was carrying him and climbing partner Tim Finocchio 800 feet down the steep slope they had just scaled on New Hampshires Mount Washington, the Northeast's highest peak at 6,288 feet.

Click here to read the article.
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Joined: March 28th, 2005, 10:24 pm

April 19th, 2009, 11:48 am #4

We will post April accident reports here.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090419/ap_ ... death_utah

SALT LAKE CITY A 49-year-old woman hiker fell 1,000 feet to her death into a snow-filled ravine on Mount Olympus, authorities said Saturday.

Karin Vandenberg, her son Cole and another 14-year-old boy slipped into the ravine, Sheriff's Lt. Don Hutson said.

The two boys survived, but suffered head injuries and possible broken bones, he said. Rescuers recovered Vandenberg's body.

Both teenagers were at Primary Children's Medical Center in stable condition, Hutson said.

"It was just a horrible scenario, a bad deal," he said.

Two other members of the hiking party, Steve Holding and his wife, Christine, avoided falling and were safely evacuated, but their 14-year-old son, Clayton, was one of injured teenagers.

Holding is the son of billionaire Earl Holding, the owner of Sinclair Oil Corp., the Little and Grand America hotels, Sun Valley ski resort in Idaho and Utah's Snowbasin resort.

Authorities insisted on evacuating the hikers by helicopter because of the threat of avalanches in warming temperatures, Hutson said.

Mount Olympus is a steep, 9,026-foot mountain just east of Salt Lake City in the Wasatch Range, which has received heavy snowfall over the past two weeks.

The five hikers were ascending the mountain a few miles below the summit when Vandenberg and the two boys fell.

Hutson said some of the hikers had been using ski poles to steady themselves on the steep climb, but they didn't have ropes or crampons, which are metal spikes that clip onto boots to give traction on snow and ice.
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

April 21st, 2009, 12:43 pm #5

We will post April accident reports here.
Kent Ascraft, a regular contributor on the Mt. Whitney bulletin board, died April 20 after a fall on Thor Peak near Mt. Whitney. More information and many messages of condolences are on this thread on the Mt. Whitney board.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 4:12 am

April 22nd, 2009, 5:26 am #6

We will post April accident reports here.
NUUK, GREENLAND - In a real scene worthy of the most harrowing reality shows, a man working on a scientific research project in Greenland's Arctic went missing last week but used survival techniques to stay alive for three days before being rescued.

The man, whose name has not been released, was rescued Saturday with the help of several international agencies, the National Science Foundation announced today.

The NSF provided few details regarding why the man got lost. Here's what's known:

The missing man was identified as a 38-year-old U.S. citizen who works as a heavy equipment operator at the station for a sub-contractor of CH2M HILL, an engineering, construction and operations company that provides logistical support for NSF's scientific research efforts in the frigid Arctic.

Before his rescue on Saturday, the man had last been seen on Wednesday night near a runway at foundation's research station at Summit, Greenland. He was reported missing on Thursday morning, launching an intensive search and rescue operation that ended when the man was found alive and alert in the early hours of Saturday morning.

Overnight temperatures in Summit this time of year typically range from around 10 degrees below zero, Fahrenheit on clear nights to around 10 degrees when it snows.

Several local and regional agencies, including the Danish Air Force, assisted. Elements of the New York Air National Guard's 109th Airlift Wing, NASA and other agencies stood by to offer support for the operation.

While the search was taking place, the missing man used survival techniques taught to all NSF and CH2M HILL-affiliated personnel in polar regions to stay alive, including digging a hole to get out of the wind and frequently moving his body to keep blood circulating, today's statement explained.

The man is now being treated at a hospital in Nuuk, the capital of Greenland, and is expected to recover.

The station is located in central Greenland atop 2 miles (3,200 meters) of ice, and is nearly 260 miles (418 km) from the nearest point of land.

Summit supports a diversity of scientific research, including year-round measurements of air-snow interactions used to interpret data from deep ice cores drilled both at Summit and elsewhere research that is crucial to building our understanding of our climate, global warming and other phenomena, according to the NSF.

The NSF also runs a permanent research base in the harsh conditions of Antarctica.

"Our personnel and contractor support staff endure personal hardships and risks in doing their jobs, and they're key to the success of our research," said Karl A. Erb, Director of NSF's Office of Polar Programs. "All of us at NSF join in thanking Greenlandic and Danish authorities for their good work in carrying out the search and rescue operation."

Click here to read the article.
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

May 2nd, 2009, 10:56 am #7

We will post April accident reports here.
http://www.wmur.com/news/19314528/detail.html
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

May 2nd, 2009, 11:00 am #8

We will post April accident reports here.
http://www.wsls.com/sls/news/local/arti ... ail/34363/
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

May 2nd, 2009, 12:42 pm #9

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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

May 2nd, 2009, 6:32 pm #10

We will post second quarter 2009 accidents/rescues here.
Post May accidents/rescues here.
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