Plaques With Bible Quotes Removed From Grand Canyon

Plaques With Bible Quotes Removed From Grand Canyon

roger
roger

July 16th, 2003, 4:30 am #1

A park spokeswoman said there was no choice but to remove the plaques from three popular spots at the canyon's busy South Rim after an inquiry made by the Arizona chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union.

"They are religious plaques on federal buildings and that's not allowed based on the law," said Maureen Oltrogge, a Grand Canyon National Park spokeswoman.

The plaques are inscribed with passages from the Book of Psalms, specifically, by chapter and verse 68:4, 66:4 and 104.24. The last verse, in the King James Version of the Bible, reads: "O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches."

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/unio ... erses.html
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Marion Bauman
Marion Bauman

July 26th, 2003, 7:12 am #2

The pitiful actions of ACLU and others who would be God are irrelevant. All of their squeeking and squirming is meaningless compared to the one and only omnipotent Lord of Lords. He is the King of Kings.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

July 26th, 2003, 11:20 pm #3

Thanks for the sermon, Marion. Isn't it a day early to be preaching? Personally, I thank God that groups like the ACLU can exist in this country to help protect me from having your personal views about God shoved down my throat.
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ray .s
ray .s

July 27th, 2003, 2:39 am #4

at least marion wasnt afraid to sign her name.
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Heironymous Merkin
Heironymous Merkin

July 27th, 2003, 3:07 am #5

Well, Ray, goody for Marion and you. It's my experience that providing real names to you God-squaders can be hazardous to your health. Too many of you subscribe to the Eric Rudolph philosophy of divine retribution. BTW, you ought to tell Marion to use her spell-checker.
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Rich
Rich

July 28th, 2003, 9:52 pm #6

The pitiful actions of ACLU and others who would be God are irrelevant. All of their squeeking and squirming is meaningless compared to the one and only omnipotent Lord of Lords. He is the King of Kings.
if God really wanted the plaques to stay, wouldn't he exercise his divine might and find a way to keep them there. Maybe he agrees with the decision of the ACLU. Hmmmm..hope this pondering doesn't keep me up nights.
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Fred
Fred

July 29th, 2003, 2:44 pm #7

The pitiful actions of ACLU and others who would be God are irrelevant. All of their squeeking and squirming is meaningless compared to the one and only omnipotent Lord of Lords. He is the King of Kings.
I saw the "God protect me from your believers" bumper stickers on a car in the parking lot at Clingman's dome.
(how is that for keeping this on topic?)

I don't personally have any problem with putting religious postings on a government building as long as everyone is be able to express their views equally. For instance, a nice quote from the Hindu goddess of Love should be able to remind everyone to partake of the joyous and holy celebration of sexual union. And maybe a Rastifarian quote saying about smoking mother nature.

As for the comment about remembering to use the spell checker; It just goes to show that bumper stickers are correct -- "Jesus saves" but doesn't spell check.

Somehow, I think that Marion Bauman wouldn't be so open to having God mentioned on a government building if it required giving everyone equal access to express his or her beliefs.

Moreover, as far as Marion referring to the Judeo-Christian God as "He", the original writings were in Hebrew and references to God were in a gender-neutral pronoun. Therefore, it would be just as correct to refer to the Judeo-Christian God as "She", in English.

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Anon
Anon

August 7th, 2003, 3:17 am #8

A park spokeswoman said there was no choice but to remove the plaques from three popular spots at the canyon's busy South Rim after an inquiry made by the Arizona chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union.

"They are religious plaques on federal buildings and that's not allowed based on the law," said Maureen Oltrogge, a Grand Canyon National Park spokeswoman.

The plaques are inscribed with passages from the Book of Psalms, specifically, by chapter and verse 68:4, 66:4 and 104.24. The last verse, in the King James Version of the Bible, reads: "O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches."

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/unio ... erses.html
I observed at least three instances of people purporting to speak out about their love for Jack Longacre at the ash scattering ceremnoy, who instead took it upon themselves to use the pulpit to espouse their views on God, Jesus, Christianity, etc. I personally found it to be inappropriate to capture the attention of 200+ highpointers and preach to them. Anyone else?
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Rumpled stilt skin
Rumpled stilt skin

August 7th, 2003, 6:02 am #9

at least marion wasnt afraid to sign her name.
How do we know that is really her name? (Or indeed, if "she" is female?)
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Alan
Alan

August 7th, 2003, 12:35 pm #10

I observed at least three instances of people purporting to speak out about their love for Jack Longacre at the ash scattering ceremnoy, who instead took it upon themselves to use the pulpit to espouse their views on God, Jesus, Christianity, etc. I personally found it to be inappropriate to capture the attention of 200+ highpointers and preach to them. Anyone else?
First, I'll have to put in a disclaimer stating that I wasn't at the IL convention this year (on my way back from a week of canoeing around Quetico Provincial Park over the MN/Canada border).

However, if you are going to whine about personal expressions of faith in the context of remembering and memorializing a good friend, I would say you need to lighten up or avoid such gatherings in the future.

I've done enough traveling around the world to have experienced a rather broad cross-section of religious expressions, architecture and traditions. In the process, I've learned to be much more accepting of others' beliefs and the origins of their faiths.

This country was founded in no small degree by people whose immediate ancestors fled religious persecution. (Recognizing the time between the initial colonization of the east coast in the 17th century and the Revolutionary War in the late 18th century) Whether you agree with any particular expression, keep in mind the fundamental freedom to express your faith (or lack thereof) in this country. Besides...listen and you might just learn something...if not about God/Yahweh/Allah/Buddha/whoever, maybe about the person speaking and why they feel the way they do...
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