Oklahoma 2002 Convention Rescheduled to September 18-22

Oklahoma 2002 Convention Rescheduled to September 18-22

roger
roger

August 6th, 2001, 4:43 pm #1

The Highpointers Convention for 2002 originally scheduled for July has been rescheduled to September 18-22 because of a scheduling conflict at the Kenton camp ground. The change should make for a "cooler" convention although we regret this may pose some hardship for families travelling with children.
Quote
Share

Anonymous
Anonymous

August 6th, 2001, 9:58 pm #2

Although September weather in the Oklahoma panhandle would probably not be as hot as weather in late July, I am seriously concerned that moving next year's Convention to September would severely dampen attendance at the Convention. At last month's convention in Maryland, we had nearly 300 participants, and many of the people who attended were families consisting of one or both parents and one or more children.

However, next year's Convention will be moved to late September, which would likely mean that most of the families with children who attended the Maryland Convention will likely not be able to attend the Oklahoma Convention. Consequently, the attendance at next year's Convention is likely to be a lot lower than it was this year.

Therefore, I am asking the readers of the forum to express their opionions about moving next year's Convention to the September date.

I am also wondering who makes the decisions about when to hold the Convention - is it the Convention organizers, the Board of Directors, or someone else? My opinion is that if the traditional last weekend in July was not available, then we should have moved the Convention to some other weekend during the period from mid-June through mid-August.

Ken Akerman
Quote
Share

Truly Anonymous
Truly Anonymous

August 6th, 2001, 10:22 pm #3

I too would prefer to see conventions to be held when families can attend, but sometimes it's a matter of the greater good for the greater numbers.

I would say that if we could limit this to every third, or second, year at most, then families could attend most conventions. It certainly is nice to go to the Appalachians in the Springtime, or to the hot states in the fall, and New England in the Fall.

It certainly would be very hot in OK any time during June - August. Some hikers would be overcome by the heat, creating possible medical emergencies that we should avoid.

We also must think of the folks who are educators, who like the kids can't come during the school year.

Lets let the Board and the convention organizers use their best judgement. I'm sure they share your position.
Quote
Share

roger
roger

August 6th, 2001, 10:58 pm #4

Although September weather in the Oklahoma panhandle would probably not be as hot as weather in late July, I am seriously concerned that moving next year's Convention to September would severely dampen attendance at the Convention. At last month's convention in Maryland, we had nearly 300 participants, and many of the people who attended were families consisting of one or both parents and one or more children.

However, next year's Convention will be moved to late September, which would likely mean that most of the families with children who attended the Maryland Convention will likely not be able to attend the Oklahoma Convention. Consequently, the attendance at next year's Convention is likely to be a lot lower than it was this year.

Therefore, I am asking the readers of the forum to express their opionions about moving next year's Convention to the September date.

I am also wondering who makes the decisions about when to hold the Convention - is it the Convention organizers, the Board of Directors, or someone else? My opinion is that if the traditional last weekend in July was not available, then we should have moved the Convention to some other weekend during the period from mid-June through mid-August.

Ken Akerman
The plan de jour in Hawaii was to always have the conventions the third weekend of each July.

However other organizations also have plans de jour and they had long standing commitments on the only available campground that was unknown at the time of the vote (even with two-years notice, it's still a nightmare to book these things).

Black Mesa is not exactly in the most populous corner of the world with a lot of alternatives. The closest bigger town is Boise City (about 30 miles) which can accomodate about 100 people. The convention sized towns are all at least 100 miles (Guyman, OK; Dalhart, TX; and Raton, NM).

So some choices had to be made.

The decision for convention sites are made by the people who actually attend them (a wise decision). The dates are set by the Convention organizers.

In September 1999 we had a September convention in Missouri. I actually thought we had more children at that convention than in Maryland!

Sure, families with kids on the Coasts probably won't make the grand drive to Oklahoma but we will get our share from Texas and the Mountain States.

And sure attendance may be down because of the "chuck wagon" roughing it requirement.

But who knows!?

There were plenty of people who thought Hawaii in July would be a big bust.

I am looking forward to it. Nothing against Oklahoma but I can't think of a prettier time to also return to neighboring Wheeler Peak.
Quote
Share

Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

August 6th, 2001, 11:45 pm #5

I too would prefer to see conventions to be held when families can attend, but sometimes it's a matter of the greater good for the greater numbers.

I would say that if we could limit this to every third, or second, year at most, then families could attend most conventions. It certainly is nice to go to the Appalachians in the Springtime, or to the hot states in the fall, and New England in the Fall.

It certainly would be very hot in OK any time during June - August. Some hikers would be overcome by the heat, creating possible medical emergencies that we should avoid.

We also must think of the folks who are educators, who like the kids can't come during the school year.

Lets let the Board and the convention organizers use their best judgement. I'm sure they share your position.
... Some hikers would be overcome by the heat, creating possible medical emergencies that we should avoid ...

I do agree that if we schedule a Highpointers Club Convention in a location that has very hot summers, we should avoid scheduling during the hottest time of the year. I live in the Phoenix area, so just about any place else in the USA is cooler than my home location during summer. However, many people, particularly more "experienced" Highpointers and those who come from cool climates, may have more trouble adjusting to the heat than I do.

We must be concerned about possible medical emergencies and we should do whatever it takes to avoid such emergencies. Extreme heat can be potentially deadly. For example, an NFL player recently died due to heat stroke at his team's training camp. This occurred last week in Minnesota, a state not generally known for its hot weather.

We should advise anyone who attends the Convention to take proper precautions if it is hot - drink plenty of water, wear a hat and sunscreen, etc.

Ken Akerman
Quote
Share

Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

August 7th, 2001, 2:17 am #6

The Highpointers Convention for 2002 originally scheduled for July has been rescheduled to September 18-22 because of a scheduling conflict at the Kenton camp ground. The change should make for a "cooler" convention although we regret this may pose some hardship for families travelling with children.
The problem with any meeting at a remote highpoint during the school year is that it makes it essentially impossible for families with children to attend. We made it to the MO convention in September, but we live only a couple of hours away from Taum Sauk (we're in St. Louis) so it was purely a day-trip for us.

The nether reaches of OK are a two-day drive for us and not conveniently reachable by air (unlike New England states, which would also be nice in the fall). That means at least a five-day trip, and all of that travel for just one day at the convention "ain't gonna happen". If you think about which states are within a day's drive of Black Mesa, where are the population centers from which families with kids can still make it? Taum Sauk is within a day of St. Louis, Chicago, Indianapolis, Memphis, Nashville, Louisville, Little Rock, Kansas City, Des Moines, etc. Denver is a long day from Black Mesa, and Colorado Springs is doable. Add Oklahoma City, Kansas City and Santa Fe, and you've hit most of the larger cities around it.

It's unfortunate that a scheduling snafu caused the club to move the date, but wasn't there some other weekend between 6/15 and 8/15 that might have worked?

Highpointing is something that my son and I do together. We had hoped to combine OK with CO and NM and make a week-long summer trip of highpoints plus the convention. If it's in September, we'll rethink our plans and will almost certainly miss the convention.

Oh, well...there will be other chances, but I was looking forward to seeing folks in OK...

Alan Ritter, jar@eng.bausch.com
http://www.mtritter.org
Quote
Like
Share

Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

August 7th, 2001, 4:20 am #7

Here is another major drawback to holding the Convention in Kenton, OK. This site is the most isolated location for any of our Highpointers Conventions. It appears to me that the closest city to Kenton with airline service is Amarillo, TX (164 miles). The next closest city is Colorado Springs (290 miles), followed by Albuquerque (331 miles), Denver (375 miles), and Oklahoma City (412 miles). There don't appear to be any other cities closer than that are big enough to have airline service.

Therefore, our biggest problem in trying to get a large attendance at our Oklahoma Convention is the isolation of the site. What can our club do about this? I want to see our club get the maximum attendance possible at every Convention.

Ken Akerman
Quote
Share

John M
John M

August 7th, 2001, 4:39 am #8

Although September weather in the Oklahoma panhandle would probably not be as hot as weather in late July, I am seriously concerned that moving next year's Convention to September would severely dampen attendance at the Convention. At last month's convention in Maryland, we had nearly 300 participants, and many of the people who attended were families consisting of one or both parents and one or more children.

However, next year's Convention will be moved to late September, which would likely mean that most of the families with children who attended the Maryland Convention will likely not be able to attend the Oklahoma Convention. Consequently, the attendance at next year's Convention is likely to be a lot lower than it was this year.

Therefore, I am asking the readers of the forum to express their opionions about moving next year's Convention to the September date.

I am also wondering who makes the decisions about when to hold the Convention - is it the Convention organizers, the Board of Directors, or someone else? My opinion is that if the traditional last weekend in July was not available, then we should have moved the Convention to some other weekend during the period from mid-June through mid-August.

Ken Akerman
OK in summer could be problematic with the heat. I'm not sure we should make 190 folks miserable so 15 kids can attend. Family attendance is important. But some venues are better in the fall. Tree colors made VA a very attractive convention. But fall color attracts lots of other tourists too. Attendence is important. But quality is too. Tradeoffs. :-\

It's important to give the convention hosts as much flexibility as possible.

Regarding the question, "who decides the dates?" well the answer is obvious. The organizers do. Those that step up to the plate and volunteer their time should call the shots. They are the ones that know best what affects the dates for a local convention.

The IL2003 dates have not been selected. I suppose we could create a poll on the Forum (of folks that may or may not end up attending). But in reality, the dates must take into consideration other factors such as 1) the HP owners' wishes, 2) the availability of facilities, and 3) the personal schedules of those that will be volunteering their time.

FYI
For IL2003 dates, I have already contacted the HP owners, and I have contacted the local tourism bureau to check on fesitvals or events that may compete for facilities and rooms. If agreeable with the team of volunteers, we will likely use the traditional weekend. I like that.

I also look forward to OK in September; a good time to go there. It will be FUN. I hope Alan and others can find a way to get the family there.
Quote
Share

John M.
John M.

August 7th, 2001, 4:47 am #9

Here is another major drawback to holding the Convention in Kenton, OK. This site is the most isolated location for any of our Highpointers Conventions. It appears to me that the closest city to Kenton with airline service is Amarillo, TX (164 miles). The next closest city is Colorado Springs (290 miles), followed by Albuquerque (331 miles), Denver (375 miles), and Oklahoma City (412 miles). There don't appear to be any other cities closer than that are big enough to have airline service.

Therefore, our biggest problem in trying to get a large attendance at our Oklahoma Convention is the isolation of the site. What can our club do about this? I want to see our club get the maximum attendance possible at every Convention.

Ken Akerman
Well, we can start by focusing on all the FUN things that the upcoming OK2002 convention will offer (and not create negatives).

I can easily imagine that the "isolation" of Black Mesa could be attractive for most urban members. This part of Oklahoma in September is an excellent place to explore. And I doubt that many members are intimidated by the distances mentioned by Ken. We are travelers.

Every site has some drawbacks. But every site has numerous postitives. Just attending and greeting each is good enough reason!
Quote
Share

Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

August 7th, 2001, 5:18 am #10

All of the highly active Highpointers that I know will not be deterred by the isolation of any site. We all travel many miles to get to high points and other interesting locations, many of which are even more isolated than Black Mesa. One of the great things that I like about Highpointing is that it has given me an opportunity to see many parts of the USA that I wouldn't have seen otherwise, and it has enabled me to see a lot more of the USA than just the populated areas.

While the isolation of the site may deter some casual Highpointers, the isolation of Black Mesa may be more appealing to an equal or greater number of avid members of the Club.

Ken Akerman
Quote
Share